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COIiliEGE 



1^ 

Prof S H Derickson 



I-IO-I2 



LEBANON VALEY COLLEGE 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, January 10, 1911 No. 14 



Volume II. 



Entered as second-class matter November 12; 1910, at the post oftlce at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1S79. 



L. V. C. Grads Meet 

in Dayton Ohio 

Alumni of College gather in Dayton 
Y. M . C. A. 

Trie following from the Dayton, 
Ohio, News is of special interest to 
L. V. because of her close relation to 
the participants in this pleasant social 
event. 

A banquet and social evening was 
enjoyed Saturday evening in the Y. M. 
C. A. building by the students, gradu- 
ates and friends of Lebanon Valley 
College, the eastern educational insti- 
tution of the United Brethren church- 
es, located at Annv'lle, Pa. The event 
was the first of its kind ever given 
in this city, and was attended by 
about 30 guests, among whom were 
two former presidents of the college, 
Rev. C. J. Kephart and Prof. E. 3. 
Lorenz. 

Dr. S. D. Faust, of Bonebrake Theo- 
logical Seminary, introduced President 
W. G. Clippinger, of Otterbein uni- 
versity, the toastmaster of the even- 
ing. An interesting, entertaining ami 
instructive program followed, opened 
by Miss Gertrude Wahner, of Lebanon, 
Pa., who played the nnale No. 2 from 
"II Trovatore." 

"Our Eastern College" was discussed 
by Rev. Arthur Clippinger, pastor of 
the Summit St. U. B. church, and Mrs. 
Mary' R. Albert told of "Her Girb." 
Prof. J. B. Showers followed with hu- 
morous recitations about "Her Boys," 
af:er which Mrs. Lorene Bowman gave 
two pl?asant readings, the second or 
which was an encore. 

"Her Societies" was entertainingly 
described by C. W. Snoop, a student 
in Bonebrake Theological Seminary, 
and "Her Proselytes" was responded to 
by Br. Golin. Tb* program conclud- 
ed with an address on "Lebanon Val- 
ley and Mission Work," delivered by 
R. P. Dougherty. Both ex-presidents 
present, Dr. Kephart and Prof. Lor- 



enz, responded to the repeated calls 
with short addresses. 

The following officers of the local 
alumni were elected: President, 8. D. 
Faust; vice president, Miss Jess:e 
Brane; secretary and treasurer, Dr. W. 
0. Fries. Two rousing college yells 
were given in closing. 

Those present on Saturday evening 
were Dr. and Mrs. C. J. Kephart, Dr. 
and Mrs. E. S. Bowman, Mr. and Mr*. 
E. S. Lorenz, Dr. and Mrs. C. I. B 
Brane, Dr. and Mrs. S. D. Faust, Dr. 
and Mrs. Gohn, Prof, and Mrs. Mac- 
Fadden, Dr. and Mrs. W. O. Fries, 
Rev. and Mrs. Arthur R. Clippinger. 
Miss Fischer, Miss Gertrude Walmer, 
Miss Sue Gabel, Miss Jessie Brane, 
Miss Justina Lorenz, Mrs. Mary R. 
Albert. Prof. J. B. Showers, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. W. Shoop and Mr. and Mrs. 
R. P| Dougherty. 

An interesting letter from Dr. Law- 
rence Keister, president of the college, 
was read during the meeting. Mr. 
Keister was unable to be present. 

A similar organization formed in 
Lebanon county, on February 12, 1910, 
was the first of the kind established 
by Lebanon Valley College alumni 
anywhere. 

Many of these people are well 
known here. 



Correction 

In a recent issue of the '"News" a 
mistake was made in the list of C. 
L. S. officers. Sara Zimmerman's 
name should have appeared as critic 
and Edna Kilmer's, as Treasurer. 



Oren G. Myers, "dO, of Red Wood 
City, California, who visited friends 
at Annville, over the Christmas holi- 
days has returned to his home, where 
he has extenisve interests in oil wells. 
Mr. Myers is a loyal alumnus and 
entered his subscription to the "College 
News" in order that he might keep 
in touch with the progress of his alma 
mater. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, Jan. 10, 6 p. m. — Prayer 
Meeting. 

Thursday, Jan. 12, 6 p. m.— Minis- 
terial Association. 

Friday, Jan. 13, 7:15 p. m.— So- 
cieties. 

Sunday, Jan. 15, 1 p. m. Christian 
Associations. 



Alumni 




Earl E. Renn, '10, a student in the 
law department of the University of 
Pennsylvania, visited friends at the 
college on Wednesday. 

Dr. and Mrs. D. Albert Kreider, of 
New Haven, Conn., were the guests 
of relatives in Annville during the 
holidays. Dr. Kreider graduated in 
1892. 

Prof. H. M. B. Lehn, '08, and wife, 
of Greenville, Pa, visited friends and 
relatives in Annville during the holi- 
days. 

H. K. Bomberger, '10, of Ligonier, 
spent several days of his vacation in 
Annville. 

A, Louise Kreider, '08, conserva- 
tory, left on Wednesday morning for 
Wells College, acompanied by Miss 
Louise Frost, who was her guest over 
the holidays, at the home of her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Kreider, of Ann- 
ville. 

Miss Lucy Seltzer, '10, has been 
substituting in the Lebanon High 
School for several weeks. 

Miss Ruth M. Hershey, '06, after 
spending her vacation at her home in 
Hershey, left on Monday morning for 
New York City, to continue her studies 
at Columbia Univeristy. 

(Continued on page 2) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of len, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

The editors of the "College News" 
wish you all a happy and prosperous 
New Year. With the close of the 
holiday vacation began the winter term 
of our college year. We also have 
begun a new calendar vear. With 
this new year comes increased op- 
portunities and advantages. A retro- 
spect of the past year will show each 
one lost opportunities and unimproved 
moments. It is to be hoped that each 
one will profit in the present year by 
seeing his errors in the one which has 
just become a matter of history. 

In another column of this paper we 
acknowledge the gift of a file of 
valuable magazines which were pre ■ 
sented to the college library by an 
alumnus. We are glad to see in- 
terest is being increased among the 
alumni, and hope that this is only the 
beginning of better things to follow 
from them for the welfare of their 
alma mater. We are glad for the 
magazines pr sented as they will fill 
a long-felt need in the History depart- 
ment. This gift is not the only one 
of its kind received from alumni, 
but, believe us, there is still room 
for more. We would suggest our 
alumni and friends to follow the 
example set by this worthy co-worker. 



If you have magazines on file which 
you do not desire to keep pemanently, 
magazines which are of interest to you 
and which would be to us. we ask you to 
send them to the Dean or directly to the 
Librarian. Due credit and acknow- 
ledgement of the same will be given, 
You may be able to fill a great need, 
just as in the present case. In no 
way can anyone show greater interest 
in, and loyalty to, the college than in 
remembering her in such ways as this. 
It is most encouraging, not only to the 
college authorities to receive them, but 
also to us as a student body to know 
that our predecessors in these 
College Halls have us and our welfare 
in mind, and are assisting us by every 
possible means. 

Christian Association Joint 
Session 

The year's work in the Christian 
Associations was begun in joint session 
of Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. W. A. 
Brunner led tho meeting and spoke upon 
A WORTH-WHILE LIFE using 
Proverbs 10, as a scripture reference. 
He cited scripture to present the 
different phases of a life that will be 
worth while and acceptable to men and 
to God. He held up as an ideal for 
such a life the life of Christ because 
His life was a life of consecration, 
devotion, and service. In order that a 
life may be made most effective one 
must learn to judge the actions of men 
less harshly and to judge one's own 
life more harshly than one commonly 
does. A life worth while expresses 
itself a service to men and to God. 

Miss Edna Kilmer, spoke upon the 
AMBITIONS OF A LIFE WORTH 
WHILE. S. 0. Grimm spoke upon 
the FRUITS OF A LIFE WORTH 
WHILE. MissVerda Snyder rendered 
a vocal solo. 

Y. W. C. A. Entertains 

On Saturday afternoon from two 
o'clock until four, the young Women's 
Christian Association gave a formal 
"Tea" in the reading room on the 
third floor of the Ladies' Dormitory. 

This was the first social affair of 
this kind given by the Y. W. C. A. 
recently. It provoted to be very 
successful, and was attended by a 
large number of members and fiiends 
of the Association. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Continued from page 1 



The engagement of Miss Alice K. 
Lutz, '08, conservatory, of Shippe.ns- 
burg, Pa., to Mr. Gideon R. Kreider, 
Jr. of Annville, was announced during 
the holidays. Mr. Gideon Kreider is 
a graduate of Lafayette and an ex- 
member of the class of '09, of Lebanon 
Valley. 

Dr. Ralph L. Engle, '05, has 
assumed the duties of resident physician 
in the Bellevue Hospital, New York 
City. 

Walter V. Spessard, '09, of law 
department of George Washington 
University, Washington, spent the 
holidays at his home here. 

Stanley R. Oldham, '08, after 
spending a week with friends in this 
vicinity, left on Monday, Jan. 2, for 
Lewiston, Maine, where he is an 
instructor at Bates College. 

William E. Herr, '07, of Naval Y. 
M. C. A., Norfolk. Va., spent his 
vacation at the home of his parents in 
Annville. 

Paul B. Smith, '03, of New York- 
City, visited relatives in Annville, over 
Christmas. 

Crossley Hall, of the Mount Hermo n 
School, Massachusetts was destroyed 
by fire, Jan. 5. Arthur Spessard, is 
Director of; the Conservatory of Music 
at this institution, and Miss Laura 
Christeson, a former student and in- 
structor here is imtuctor on the piano. 

Rev. G. I. Rider, '05, Hagerstown, 
Md., presented the college library 
with a file of the "Confederate 
Veteran." 

Roger S. B. Hartz. '08, of Cornell, 
spent his vacation at his home in 
lalmyra. 

C. E. Shenk, '06, is now on tha 
"Harrisburg Patriot." 

Professor Shot, of Westminister 
College, New Wilmington, Pa., visited 
friends in Annville recently. Professor 
Shot was a member of our college 
faculty from 1892-5. 

Max F. Lehman, '07, and Reba 
Lehman, '00, spent the Christmas 
hulidays at the home of their parents, 
Prof, and Mrs. J. E. Lehman, in 
Annville. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



Fill out and return to Business Manager 



PHILOKOSMIAN 
Resume, Gideon Blouch ; The Long 
and Short of the Holidays, Ivan Potter ; 
Vocal Trio, C. C. Smith, Samuel 
Plummer, W. Albert Brunner; Im- 
promptu D.bate: Affirmative, 0. T. 
Ehrhart, C. F. Harnish, Negative, 
Guy Wingerd, C. C Smith; Piano 
Duette, Earle Loser, Paul Loser; 
My Rules cf Order, W. A. Brunner; 
Autobiography, Oliver Butterwick ; 
Living Thoughts, Editor. 

KALOZETEAN 

Clarinet solo, Arthur Light; Read- 
ing, Allen Walters; Erlich's Re- 
searches, Jesse Keed ; Piano solo, Allen 
Meyer; Debate Resolved: That a 
student shoud be more loyal to his 
college than to his society : Affirma- 
tive, Harry Charlton, Karl Schmidt, 
Negative, D. Young, Edgar Landis ; 
Chorus, Society; Examiner by the 
Editor, William Dunlap. 

CLIONIAN 

Owing to the absence of several 
members having parts in the scene 
from ''Julius Caesar," an Impromptu 
program was rendered last Friday 
evening. 

The program on "Julius Caesar" 
which is as follows will be given this 
week. 

Piano solo, Sara Strickler; Review 
■ of "Julius Caesar," Lottie Spessard; 
Reading, Helen Weidler; Act I, Scenes 
I, II, Misses Snyder, Yarkers, Mc- 
Curdy, Klauser, and Smith; Vocal 
duet, Ora Bachman, Edith Gingirch ; 
Act I Scene III, Misses Simth, 
Yarkers, Klauser and Brightbill ; Piano 
Duet, Anna Fry, Katie Gingrich. ; 
Olive Branch, Editor. 



Enclosed find_ 



for which please j e r "^/ w } 



Missionary Returns to Field 

Rev. R. P. Daugherty, '97, who 
completed his course at Bonebrake 
Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, last spring, 
will sail for Freetown, West Africa, 
on January 14. Rev. Daugherty will 
resume his duties ns principal of Albeit 
Academy immediately cn his return to 
Freetown. During his furlough in this 
country, Rev. Daugherty was married 
to Miss Landes, of Dayton. Rev. and 
Mrs. Daugherty visited friends in 
Lebanon, enrcute to New York City, 
where they will take ship for Freetown. 



my subscription for the u College iVeirs" for_ years. 



NAME 



Address 



Items of Interest 



The following officers were installed 
for the coming term of the Fhilokos- 
rr.ian Literary Society at the regular 
meeting on Friday evening: 

President, E. A. Spessard; Vice 
President, Earle Carmany ; Recording 
Secretary, Amos H. Weigle; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Ellis Zimmerman; 
Critic, Paul R. Koontz; Editor, Sam- 
uel B. Plummer; Chaplain, W. A. 
Brunner ; Janitor, Claude Reddick; As- 
sistant Janitors, Leonard Reddick and 
Gideon Blouch. 

LaVerne Keister, delightfully en- 
tertained at her home, in Annville, on 
Monday, Dec. 26. Misses Frantz, 
Kreider, Meyers, and Rigler, rendered 
several solos during the evening. 
Delicious refreshments were served. 

Mips Margaret Rigler, entertained 
some of her girl friends at her home 
in Annville, on the afternoon of Thurs- 
day Dec. 29. Everybody had a delight- 
ful time. 

Miss Edna Fleurie, of Newport, a 
former student in the conservatory, 
visited friends in Annville duiing (he 
holidays. 

P. R. Koontz, '11, spent a week 
during vacation as the guest of S. G. 
Ziegler, '11, at Duncannon, Pa. 

Mervin Hacker, a former student was 
married last week to Miss Iva Lap<e of 
Highspire, 

Elmer E. Yake, a former student Of 
the college, now a Junior at Lehigh 



University, spent a brief vacation wit n 
his parents Mr. and Mrs. Fred W. 
Yake, of East Main Street. Mr. 
Yake's early return to Lehigh was 
necessitated on account of duties as 
Editor in Chief of the Epitome, the 
annual publication by the Junior class 
of that institution. From what we 
know of Mr. Yake's energetic and 
efficient work we predict a most in- 
teresting volume. 

Rev. Paul Holdcraft a former 
student was married during the Christ- 
mas holidays. He is a member of the 
Pennsylvania Conference and is located 
in Maryland. 

Miss Ethel Daugherty, daughter 
of the Rev. and Mrs. Daugherty, of 
ElizabetHown has matriculated as a 
new student in the department of ora- 
tory. 

Miss Florence Behm, head of the 



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PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



department of Art was in Philadelphia 
for several days last week. 

President Keister spoke on Sunday, 
Jan. 1, at a Men's meeting at the Her- 
shey Y. M. C. A. 

Miss Edith McCurdy, a member of 
the class of 19il in oratory, will be a 
resident student at the college during 
the remainder of the year. 

Phares B. Gibble, a Senior Academy 
student, has been chosen to fill the 
charge of West Lebanon U. B. Chruch. 

The appointment was formerly held 
by Mark G. Holtzman, who resigned 
the charge in lieu of Y. M. C. A. work 
in Lebanon. 

W. L, Murray spent Monday 
evening"" and Tuesday in Duncannon. 

Star Course 

The Star Course Committee was 
obliged to announce immediately on 
returning to school that the entertain- 
ment to be given on Thursday evening 
by the Dudley Buck Company had to be 
postponed. This action was necessary 
on account of a member of the com- 
pany being severely ill in the hospital. 

The correct date for this number has 
not vet been announced. 

It is to be hoped the public will not 
lose confidence in the course on account 
of this misfortune. The corrcet date 
will be announced in these columns as 
soon as possible. 



Matters Historical 

Commencement Exercises of 1869 as 
Repcrled in Contemporary Press 
"The commencement exercises at 
Lebanon Valley College, at Annville on 
Tuesday last, were very interesting 
and highly creditable to that institu- 
tion. The orations and essays were 
not of the sophomorical character, 
•'full of sound and fury, signifying 
nothing," but abounded ir. good, 
common-sense ideas, chastely and well 
expressed. Among the other excellent 
productions was an essay by Miss 
Sallie Burns, on 'Woman,' which was 
very hap.iily c.nceivcd and pervaded 
by original and sound suggestions. 
The music by the Singing Class of ti e 
College was excellent. The Hass con- 
tains some superior voices which have 
been neatly cultivated under the train- 
ing of Prof. Hammond. Persons hav- 
ing children or wards to educate should 
visit and make themselves acquainted 
with the merits of this institution." 
— Lebanon Courier, June 24, 1869. 



jCebcinon 2/alley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
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Represented at College 

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COIiliEGE KEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, January 17, 1911 No. 15 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post oliiee at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Large Crowd at 

Biological Field Club 

Prof. Derickson Lectures on Trip to 
Jamaica 

On Wednesday evening of last week, 
Prof. S. H. Derickson, heard of the 
Department of Biology, gave to the 
memhers of the Biological Field Club 
and visitors in attendance a most 
excellent and instrcutive lecture on his 
own observations concerning plant and 
animal life found in Jamaica, B. W. 
I., which he recorded druing his recent 
stay on that island. 




PROF. S. H. DERICKSON 



The lecture was beyond doubt the 
best scientific production ever heard in 
the department and under the auspices 
of tlie Field Club. Besides going int" 
a description relative to the habits 
and characteristics of the plants and 
animals found there, Professor dis- 
played his fine collection of material, 
which made the lecture eqjally en- 
tertaining as well as instructive. 

First, Jamaica was desc-ibed as to 



its contours, its temperatuie, the 
inhabitants and their occupation, and 
finally the tropical plant and animal 
life found there. 

Prof. Derickson was in Company 
with Dr. Johnson and a party of men 
from Johns Hopkins University and 
being concerned more particularily as 
to plant life, but little time was spent 
in the studying and collecting of animal 
material. However Professor told u s 
of the many beautiful tropical birds 
found [there, of the many varieties of 
lizards, that are present on the island. 
Besides the habits of the tropical ants 
and scorpions were discussed. Of all 
these and others not mentioned here for 
want of space, excellent specimens were 
produced bv which he could verify his 
remarks. 

As to the plant life of Jamaica, the 
ferns and mo«ses were found in the 
greatest abundance He said that in 
the mountainous districts of the islands 
they occur in astonishing profusion and 
variety upon moist rocks and trunks of 
trees, as well as upon the earth. He 
said too, that one of the most at- 
tractive features of certain parts of 
the island is the giant tree fern with 
erect stems of palm-like appearance, 
which lift their great crowns of leaves 
twenty to thirty feet in the air. The 
lycopodia'es, cacti, coffee plants and 
scores of others were discussed and 
hundreds more were not taken up at 
all due to lack of time. These facts 
concerning plant life were made clear 
to every one by actual specimens. 
With the aid of the stereoptican, 
Professor threw on the screen, small 
mosses and ferns, otherwise unable to 
be demonstrated. 

The lecture was excellent, and every 
member of the Club looks forward to 
another which we hope we can influence 
Prof. Derickson to give in the college 
chapel. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday evening 6 p. m. — Students 
prayer meeting. 
Friday evening, 7 :15 p. m. — Societies. 
Saturday, 8 :00 p m.— Lecture Bishop 
Bell. 



At the conclusion of the program in 
appreciation of Professor Derickson's 
excellent lecture, the members of the 
club tendered him a vote of thanks. 

Star Course— Bishop Bell 

On Saturday evening January 21, 
there will be given an opportunity for 
those who hold Star Course season 
tickets, to use them in a substitute- 
lecture to be given by Bishop Wm. M. 
Bell of the United Brethren Church. 
This lecture is to be substituted for 
the Dudly Buck Company, who failed 
to appear at the beginning of this 
month, owing to the sickness of one of 
its members. 

The committee was extremely sorry 
not to be able to procure this splendid 
company of singers and entertainers, 
hut it feels equally proud that it has 
succeeded in procuring the services of 
Bishop Bell as a substitution for that 
number. Bishop Bell will lecture on 
his famous subject, "American 
Pearls." Those of us who heard him 
at Mount Gretna last summer are 
keenly anticipating a treat. His 
lectures are always full of vim and pow- 
er, every word weighty and striking. 

No student should fail to attend this 
lecture, whether he has a season ticket 
or not. 

Every student advertise this lecture, 
and see to it that Lebanon Valley and 
Annville gives Bishop Bell a cheering 
reception. 

DON'T FORGET, this lecture is a 
SUBSTITUTE for the last star course 
number which failed to appear. 
Season tickets admit. Admission 
25 cents and P5 cents. 



College fterjcis 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. It. KOONTZ, '11 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 
E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 
P. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, "12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner. Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Men have often been heard to say 
that life would not be such a bad and 
treacherous step if it were not for the 
final reckoning. Such men we have 
invariably branded es lacking seme 
essentials. 

Now it seems to be the feelings of 
not a few students that the real bugbear 
in the apprehension of learning is, 
the final-examination. This testing- 
machine has received such a scandalous 
reputation for taking the wrong stuff 
OUT of a man and putting cor- 
respondingly evil stuff IN him, that I 
doubt whether twenty-five per cent of 
studentg really do ever entertain a 
true idea of the pruposes and possible 
value of an examination to a partici- 
pant. 

It is not the purpose of this editorial 
to thoroughly present and discuss the 
question, but merely to suggest some 
thoughts that might serve thh privi- 
leged student-body in the grand feast 
between Jan. 22-27. 

In one respect, a tough examination 
is as good for a man as a first class 
foot-ball game. It is a grand test of 
nerve composure and firmness. The 
man who can calmly anticipate an ex- 
amination which promises to be search- 
ing, and refrain from spoiling his 



COLLEGE NEWS 



newly laundried cuffs or some bits of 
vest-pocket-sized paper specially 
measured and prepared for the event; 
the man who can keep those "stop- 
page' words to himself when he ha s 
discovered that he has copied the wrong 
thing, that man has as much nerve as 
it takes to trod the gridiron. This 
may be questioned by some, but those 
of us who have had the guilty pleasure 
of both, know how true it is. 

If the energy that is wasted in 
toiling and sweating over the prepara- 
tion of "trots" for examinations were 
directed towards an honest, determined 
and religious review of the subject; 
the student would do immeasurably 
more good for others and for himself. 

If the time spent, during the 
examination in watching the vigilent 
eye of the professor whose duty it is to 
"watch and pray," were spent in an- 
swering the questons, there might be 
less need of teaching ethics in our in- 
stitutions of learning. 

It takes a good fellow to be a first 
class cheater, and instead of trying 
to depreciate the value of such a man, 
we wish by these few remarks to 
awaken the manhood that is in him and 
if possible, to help him direct his 
energies in the right channel for real 
power and worth. 

In the coming examinations let us all 
unitedly stand up against the student 
who offers to aid or to receive aid. 
Let us bestow on such a menial, all 
the vindictive scorn and disgust that 
we possess. Let it never be said again 
that we can "slide through" at 
Lebanon Valley. What good would 
such an institution be to us? It is the 
students' business to suppress such a 
feeling if it ever exhists. No faculty 
has ever succeeded in absolutely wiping 
out cheating, in examinations, but 
student-bodies have. It remains for 
us, then, as students to exterminate 
this evil. It is not for the faculty to 
do. 



Mr. Chas. Brunner of New Bloom- 
field presented our museum with a 
very curious stone during the past 
week. It is of igneous formation 
with a hollow interior in which are 
several pebbles, which make it a 
natural rattle. Gifts of their kind 
are much appreciated by those in charge 
of the museum. 



INTERESTING LECTURES 



Prof. W. E. Coleman Talks on Socia r 
Ethics 

College students and friends received 
a treat during the past week in the 
shape of four lectures in the College 
Chapel on Social Ethics. Prof. J. 
M. Coleman, of the Universities, of 
Michigan and Bonn, Germany, deliver- 
ed the lectures on "The State and 
Government," "The State," "The 
Church and Government, " and "The 
Government and God." Prof. Cole- 
man, who is especially well equipped 
for this kind of work, attracted larg e 
audiences at each of his interesting 
and instructive lectures. 

Prof. Coleman is supported in his. 
lecture work by his Church denomina- 
tion which is particularly interested 
in various Church and Government 
topics. 

SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

KALOZETEAN 
Current Events, Robert Light; 
Chorus, Value of Bacteria to 
Civilization, Ivan Ressler; Ora- 
tion, Georse A. Williams; Debate: 
Resolved, that Airships will tend to 
bring about Universal Peace. Affirma- 
tive, Victor Heffilfinger, Boaz Light. 
Negative, Warren Hayes, John Lyter; 
Piano Solo. Paul Strickler; Humorous 
Reading, Walter Biever. 

CLIONIAN 
Piano Solo. Myrtle Behney ; Auto- 
biography, Blanche Risser; Instru- 
mental Sol?, Evelyn Weinman ; Book 
Review, Carrie Light ; Girl's Basket 
Ball a'; L. V. C, Edith Lehman ; 
Original Story, Edith McCurdy ; Essay, 
Esther Schell; Vocal Solo, Myrtle 
Turby. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Resume, Robert Hartz ; Original 
Story, Forrest Ilensel; Debate: 
Resolved, that United States senators 
hould be elected by popular vote. 
Affirmative Leray Harnish, Earl Car- 
many. Negative, Clarence Ulrich, 
Samuel Ze : gler ; Mandolin Solo, Lester 
Spessard; State Constabulary, Wm. 
Murray. 

John Geyer, Esq, '98, will he one 
of the speakers at a Masonic banquet 
to be held at Hershey in the evening 
of January 18. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SCHEDULE OF SEMESTER EXAMINATIONS 

To Be Given January, 23-27, 1911 



MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


wednes'y 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


Chapel 


Chapel 


Chapel 


Chapel 


' Chapel 


Math A2 
Greek a 
Math 3 
Bible 3 


Econ 1 
Chem 6 
Ger 1 . 
Phil 5 


Eng- d 
Science d 
Hist 4 


Germ 2 
Greek 2 
Chem 1 


Latin 1 
Latin 2 
Latin 3 
Eng- 9 


Ger a 
Bio la 
Chem 2 


Math 1 
Biol lb 
Greek Id 


Hist 5 
Eng 3 
Bible 1 


Math c 
Phil 4 
Eng- 2 


Math a 
Math b 
Greek lc 
Latin a 


Latin c 
Latin b 
Ger 3 & 4 
Greek 2 


Germ b 
Phil 1 
Math 6 
Greek 1 


Eng- 1 
Astron 


Eng- b 
Greek lb 
Hist 1 
Eng- 7 
Physics 1 


French 1 
French 2 
Hist b 
Phys Geo 



Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Leister led the meeting on 
Sunday afternoon. His subject was 
the "Blessedness of affliction" In a 
simple and concerning way he showed 
the value of affliction. By quoting 
many references from the scripture 
and using many illustrations from life 
and Bible, he proved his argument. 

The main points brought out were, 
that affliction teaches men the need of 
prayer, that it draws us nearer to 
Christ. 

He pointed out that although the 
righteous and sinners usually have 
afflictions, yet the sinless are better 
able to bear their burden. The 
general discussion that followed was 
full of life and interest. The philoso- 
phical side of the question came in 
for a good deal of discussion. The 
meeting was well attended, and the 
spirit of devotion was manifest and the 
interest very good. 



Ministerial Association 

The first regular meeting of the 
College Ministerial Association was 
held on Thursday evening. The meet- 
ing was interesting, but not very well 
atteded, owing to a number of the 
members being actively engaged in the 
regular evangelistic work for the 
winter. Most of these meetings are 
being very well attended, and good 
results are being obtained. 

Rev. H. B. Spayd, the College 
pastor, read an interesting and in- 
structive paper on "The Minister and 
his attitude toward Poiltics." The 



next meeting will be held on he first 
Thursday evening in the second 
semester. 



Freshmen Win At Basket Ball 

TheS. K. Walking Club, of Lebanon, 
was defeated by the Lebanon Valley 
College Freshmen in the Y. M. C. A. 
cage on Wednesday evening by the 
score of 30 to 26. An extra five- 
minute period was reqiured to decide 
the game. At the end of the second 
20-minute half the score was 24 to 24. 
The summary : 
Walking Club 
Kistler forward 
Hutchinson forward 
center 
guard 
guard 

Field goals— Kistler, 6; Kepley, 4 
Strickler, 5; Charlton, 6; Light, 1 
Smith, 2. Foul goals— Kistler 5, 
Hutchinson, 1 ; Cnarlton, 2. Ref 
eree— R. Moore. 



Kepley 
Becker 
Frost 



L. V. C. 
Strickler 
Charlton 
Light 
Smith 
Kreider 



Lebanon Co Alumni Banquet 

The committer which has in charge 
the arrangements for the annual 
banquet of the Lebanon Valley College 
Association for Lebanon County held a 
meeting last week and outlined the 
plans for the banquet which will be 
held this year on February 13. The 
place has not yet been decided upon 
but will be selected shortly, when the 
committee will notify those graduates 
and former students living in the 
country, whose names they have. 
There are no doubt many persons who 
have at some time attended the college, 
about whom the committee does not 
know. If anyone knows of persons 
who didnot receive notice of last year's 
banquet the commitee would like to 
know of them. Elmer L. Haak, of 
Myerstown is the secretary. 

Prominent speakers are being secured 
for the banquet. 



Oratory Notes 

Miss Adams, the head of the depart- 
ment, read before a ladies club of 
Lebanon, last week. She recited some 
poems of Browning and of Burns. Her 
work was splendidly received and Miss 
Adams was very enthusiastically enter- 
tained by the society. 

Ihe recital of the Oratory Depart- 
ment will take place Thursday evening 
January 26, in Engle Hall. It will 
consist of readings by several students, 
and a short humorous sketch. The 
participants have all been working 
hard and have spent a great amount of 
labor for this recital and we hope to 
give an interesting and entertaining 
program. It is hooed that the stu- 
dents of the college wil sttend and in- 
vite their friends. 



Fill out and return to Business Manager 



Enclosed tincL 



for which please | € ^^" w j 



my subscription for the "College News'' for_ 



.vears. 



NAME 



Address 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Y. W. C. A. 

The recently organized Reading 
Circle held its first meeting in the 
Y. W. C. A. reading room, last 
Thursday evening at six o'clock. 

The attendance was excellent. 
Miss Bertha Spessard read aloud from 
the book entitled, "The Lady of the 
Decoration," by Frances l ittle. This 
is a story dealing with the experiences 
of a woman who was engaged in kinder- 
garden work in Japan. 

It aroused so much interest that it 
was agreed to devote a portion of the 
Sunday afternoon meeting to reading 
the book. 

Miss Edna Yarkers who led the 
meeting on Sunday, conducted a shore 
devotional services after which the rest 
of the time was given over to the 
"Lady of the Decoration." 



Items of Interest 



Miss Mary Nissley of Middletown 
spent several days here with her 
friends. 

Prof. S. H. Shenk, spent Saturday 
in Philadelphia. 

Prof. A. R Spessard, of Mt. Her- 
mon, Mass. sends word to the News 
that one of the largest buildings of 
Moody's School was lately burned to 
the ground. 

Mr. Blazier, photographer from 
Lebanon, was on the can-pus on Mon- 
day taking photos of the buildings. 
These photos will be used for post- 
cards. 

Dr. W. 0. Fries, of Dayton Ohio, a 
former student of Lebanon Vallej, 
came to Annville cn Saturday. He 
is sent litre by the cemmittee, of 
church officers at Dajton, Ohio, to 
assist Rev. H. B. Spayd with evange- 
listic services of two weeks duration. 



jCebanon Valley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System, 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
Lawrence Jfeister, !Pres. 

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When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

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826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

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Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

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/Represented at College 

CFull line of College Post Cards, 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

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WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement Invitations 
Class Day Programs and 
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Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

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Shortage of fully lO.ooo Operators on account of 
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COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. AnnvilU, Pa. 


, Tuesday, January 24, 1911 


No. 16 


. Entered as second-class matter November 12 


1910, at the post ofllce at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 





Bishop Bell Lectures 
on "American Perils" 

A LARGE AND APPRECIATIVE 
AUDIENCE GREETS THE 
BISHOP 

On Saturday evening last, in the 
Engle Conservatory, Bishop Win. M. 
Bell of Los Angeles Cal , lectured on 
his celebrated subject, "American 
Perils." The Hall was packed almost 
to its limit with eager listeners from 
towns extending from Harrisburg to 
Reading inclusive. 

The Bishop w^s received with an 
enthusiastic applause as he crossed the 
platform. In spite of the fact that he 
reached us after giving a series of 
fifteen addresses in five days, at Read- 
ing, he showed no signs of fatigue 
when he arose to address the audience. 




BISHOP WM. M. BELL, D.I). 



Starting calmly cn the preliminary 
explanations of his talk, he steadily 
inreased his ardor and vim until ap- 
plause upon applause greeted eacli of 
his great and earnest statements. He 
talked for an hour and a half and only 
because lie was obliged to leave on the 
9:30 train, did the audience suffer the 
great Bis.iop to end his lecture. 

The committee wishes again to state 
here that this lecture was given as a 



substitute for the Dudley Buck Co., 
which failed to appear at the scheduled 
time. However if it can possibly be 
arranged we will present that Com- 
pany later. This of course cannot be 
guaranteed to our patrcns, as yet but 
if successful, we shall announce it 
later. 

The next number of the Star Course 
will be the celebrated Grand Opera 
Tenor Signor Bartilotti and his Com- 
pany, on February 18, 1911. 



Oratory Recital 

Ihe students of the Oratory depart- 
ment will appear in the first public 
recital under the direction of Miss 
Mabelle Adams on Thursday evening 
of this week in the College chapel 
Each member has been working hard 
for this occasion, and an excellent pro- 
gram is assured. This recital will be 
given strictly by the students of the 
department, Miss Adams having no 
part to perform on the program. 

This may be a disappointment to 
many, bnt we are glad to state that in 
all probability, Miss Adams will appear 
in a public recital in the College chapel 
in the near future. Further announce- 
ment will be made later. 



Lebanon County Banquet 

The Alumni of Lebanon County will 
hold their annual banquet on Monday 
evening, February 13, at Hotel 
Weimer, Lebanon. Excellent speakers 
have been procured for the occasion. 
Letters will be sent out this week to 
all persons whose names are in the 
hands of the committee in charge. 



A single grateful thought toward 
heaven is the most complete prayer. 
Lessing. 



Destiny bears us to our lot, and 
destiny id perhaps our own will. — 
Disraeli. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, Jan. 24, 6 p. m.— prayer 
meeting. 

Thursday, Jan. 26, 7:45 p. m.— 
Oratory Recital in College Chapel. 

Friday, Jan. 27, 7 p. m.— Societies. 

Sunday, Jan. 29, 1 p m. -Christian 
Associations. 




Alumni 



Miss Grace B. Lowery, '09, of 
Harrisburg is teaching in Hammond, 
Ind. 

Rev. W. 0. Fries D. D. , '82, asso- 
ciate editcr of the Sunday School 
literature, spent last week here, assist- 
ing Rev. Spayd in conducting revival 
services in the local United Brethren 
Church. 

Mr. M. R. Metzgar, '08, of Middle- 
town, who finished his second year in 
the law department of the University 
of Pennsylvania, is now reading law 
with the firm of Hargest and Hargest, 
of Harrisburg. 

J. C. Strock. '10. D. E. Long, '00, 
Mary B. Musser. '10, V. O. Weidler, 
'10, Dr. M. W. Brunner, '01, Lena 
May Hoerner, '10, and Alfred K. 
Mills, '04, are among the aiumni who 
have renewed their subscriptions for 
the "News" during the past week. 

Professor N. C. Schiichter, '97, is 
the author of a poem, published in last 
weeks "Watchword." 

Miss Alice Lutz, '08. Conservatory, 
has been recently elected to the head 
of the newly established Voice Depart- 
ment, of the Arcadian Seminary, at 
Wolfville, Nova Scotia. 

Prof. T. Bayard Beatty, of the class 
of 1904, also a graduate of the depart- 
Continued on page 2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College jfiems 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER. '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 
OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cis. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

The present week finds us at the 
middle of our course for the year. 
With this turning point come the 
dreaded examinations. Dreaded by 
some, I say, but hailed with a certain 
degree of delight by others. If we 
have been faithful in the regular rou- 
tine of work during the semester, 
there should be little need for cram- 
ming. And if we have not kept up to 
our standard of worK, and thus fall 
snort in this, the day of reckoning, we 
know full well who is to blfme. 

But we would not speak especialy 
of examinations this week. We are 
about to begin the work of the new 
semester. With some of us it is the 
entering of the last lap on the home 
stretch; with others it is only the real 
beginning of the race. Every one 
from the lowest class in the Academy 
to the senior in College is supposed 
and expected to put forth his best effort 
in this great race for character, for 
manhood, for womanhood. It is to be 
hoped that no one will fall behind, 
"break," <^r be out-distanced in the 
splendid race this year, but rather 
that all come in strong and with re- 
newed energy, striving always for the 
best there is in a colbge course. Let 
each one take a firm hold on each op- 



portunity, whether it be in College 
work, Society or Christian Association, 
and make the best use possible of it. 
In this way, when the race is finished, 
we can at least feel that we have put 
forth our greatest effort, and that we 
have run a good race in so far as we 
were able. 

"He that cannot reason is a bigot, 
he that dare not reason is a salve, and 
he that will not reason is a fool." 
This is a statement of Andrew Jackson. 
Now we all know that "Andy" was a 
hot headed man and yet in many of his 
fiery statements there is more than a 
grain of truth. 

Every one of us have at some time 
or other had dealings with individuals 
who set up their own opinions as the 
highest ideal and stubbornly stick to 
these in spite of the fact that nearly 
every one upholds the opposite view. 
Is such action reasonable or is it just? 
Is it not better to take advantage of 
the wind sometimes and step clear of 
the shoals? 

There are many people who go 
through life grumbling about things 
and always looking thru dark glasses. 
Why nDt change the color and have a 
bright prospect? Take a little time 
now and then to reason matters out and 
maybe the fault will be found at your 
own door. Let every fellow who finds 
himself disposed to knocks at things 
generally, make one application of 
"Andy's" philosnphy and find in which 
class he really belongs. This may 
make the coming semester the most 
cheerful one of your college career and 
your whole life brighter. If you 
can't boost, Don't Knock. 

~Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting on Sunday was led by 
Warren Hayes. His subject was 
"Prayer," and he gave us a review 
of the value of prayer. President 
Keister was preserit and made an 
address upon the sarre subject. He 
said that we should never undertake 
anything with the hope of being 
successful without offering up a prayer 
to God. F. R. Kennedy and W. A. 
Brunner gave some personal ex- 
periences pertaining to the subject. 

There was a rather slim attendance 
at the meeting for which we are very 
sorry and we hope for a larger audience 
next Sunday. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

( ontinued from page 1 

ment of public speaking, at present 
Prof, of Public Speaking and Shake- 
speare in Pittsburg High School, which 
position he has filled with credit for 
the past six years, will deliver a 
Lecture-Recital on "The Merchant of 
Venice" at Massanuten Academy, 
Woodstock, Virginia, about the middle 
of April. Professor Beatty was Pro- 
fessor of English in Massanuten 
Academy the year following his gradu- 
ation from L. V. C. leaving that posi- 
tion to accept the one which he now 
holds. 

An effort is being made to arrange 
with Prof. Beatty to render his 
Lecture-Recital at our college some 
time in April. 

A friend of the "College News" 
has recently received a communication 
from Prof. H. H. Baish, '01, Superin- 
tendent of the department of Educa- 
tion. Altoona, Pa., in which he ex- 
presses his interest and appreciation of 
the "News" and sends kind regards 
and good wishes to all his college 
friends. 

The treasurer of the alumni associa- 
tion is preparing some statistics con- 
cerning the finances of the Association 
which he expects to publish in "The 
News" together with a list of the 
members of the association who have 
paid their annual dues in full. Don't 
you want your name to appear in 
this list? 



Conservatory Notes 

Among those who attended the 
"Nordica" Recital at the Majestic 
theater, Harrisburg, on Thursday 
evening were Prof, and Mrs. Sheldon, 
Miss Brown, Miss Sara Strickler, '12, 
and Harry Ulrich. 

Mis3 Ora Bachman, 11, expects to 
fill the position as organist of the local 
U. B. Church by the first of February. 

Mis. F. S. Wagonseller and son are 
the guests of Prof, and Mrs. Sheldon. 

Mis3 Alice Musselman, of Phila- 
delphia, is spending a few days with 
Miss Ethel Brown. 

Misses Naomi Ely and Evelyn Weid- 
rnan, spent Thursday evening in Pal- 
myra as the guest of Miss Eva Foltz. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



KALOZETEAN 
Vocal Solo, Warren Haves; History 
of William Stager; Chorus by society; 
Impromptu; Debate: Resolved, That 
co-educational institutions are the best 
for women; Impromptu speakers; Ori- 
ginal Story, Edward Sutch ; Anecdotes, 
Mason Long; Original Poem, Chester 
Everado Rettew. 

CLIONIAN 
Piano Solo, Ruth E. Engle; Current 
Events, Viola CJruber; Reading, Verda 
Snyder; Sketch, Florence Chrisieson, 
Helen Brightbill: Vocal Solo, Edith 
Gingrich; Discussion, Should College 
Students Have Final Examinations, 
Affirmative, Lizzie Lau, Negative, 
Edna Kilmer; Olive Branch, Editor; 
Piano Solo, Ora Bachman. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Resume, Leonard Reddick; Paper, 
Lime Stone Quarries of Lebanon County 
R. B. Saylor; Debate — Resolved 
That a voter can better serve his 
country bv constantly supporting one 
party than by being an independent 
voter. Affirmative, A. 0. Kauffman, 
V. D. Mulhollen. Negative, P. R. 
Koontz, E. G. Loser; Vocal Solo, 
Forrest Hensel ; Will? SedicRline; 
Living Thoughts, Editor. 

In The Halls ofL. V. C. 

Fair autumn days are past and o'er, 

But never a care have we; 
For we fill the hours with richest 
lore, 

In the halls of L. V. C. 

The cold wind3 of winter will come 
and go, 
Yet nnver a care have we; 
The joy of learning keeps hearts 
aglow, 
In the halls of L. V. C. 

Sweet spring will smile then step 
aside, 

And never a care have we. 
Perennial Spring must never abide, 
In the halls of L. V. C. 




Items of Interest 



Prof. H. E. Wanner, spent Sunday 
at his home in York, Pa. 

F. S. Hensel, '12, and Oliver Butter- 
wick, '12, spent Saturday afternoon in 
Harrisburg. 

Prof. H. E. Spessard addressed a 
local institute at Five Points on Friday 
evening. 

W. L. Murray spent Sunday at his 
home in West Fairview. 

W. H. Ryland, a student of the 
college about thirty years ago, at 
present residing at Cressona, visited 
the college on Tuesday. 

Miss Ethel Daugherty, returned to 
her home at Elizabethtown on Friday 
owing to the illness of her mother. 

Will iam Lightof Ottawa 111., circu- 
lated among friends at the college on 
Thursday. 

V. D. Mulhollen, '13, was called to 
his home at Wilmore on Friday. 

P. R. Koontz, '11. attended a 
birthday dinner at his home in West 
Fairview on Thursday evening. 

C. F. Harnish, '12, spent several 
days last week in Philadelphia visiting 
his sister, and also attending the 
Shakespearian plays given by Marlowe 
and Southern. 

Miss Juanita Husband from Vassar 
spent several days here visiting her 
friend, Miss Edith Morrison. 

A. H. Weigel, '13, assisted S. G. 
Ziegler, '11, in the revival services in 
the U. B. Church at Duncannon on 
Friday evening. 

Last Tuesday morning at the chapel 
exercises the student body was 



much favored to listen to an ad- 
dress on "The Self Determining 
forces," by Bishop Bell. Dr. W. 0. 
Fries, of Dayton and Rev. H. B. 
Spayd, the college pastor, were also 
pr°sent. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Edna Kilmer led the meeting 
on Sunday afterncon. She took for her 
subject "The Marks of a Christian." 
After reading a short scripture lesson, 
she read extracts from an article by 
Charotte Adams, on "The Marks of a 
Christian." The leader then com- 
mented on the article emphasizing par- 
ticularly the thought that a Christian's 
Marks must be visible and easily re- 
cognized. The Christian himself is 
the human embodiment of his faith. 

Those who do not profess Christianity 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
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American, $2.50 per day and up 




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Opportunity for a College Man 

A well established and good paying Publishing 
Business requiring only a modest cipital can be 
secured on favorable terms. An unusually good 
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Fill out and return to Business Manager 
Enclosed find 



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.years. 



NAME 



The voice of Summer will scatter us 
far, 

Still never a care have we; 
For naught on earth can our hearts 4 c / c / ress 
debar, 

From the halls of L. V. C. 

— Delia Courson, '08. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



mark the Christian by his everyday 
conduct toward Cod and his fellow-men. 
These external marks by which the 
Christian is recognized come from the 
burning in upon the inmost being, the 
image and spirit of Him whose we are 
and whom we serve. 

A lively discussion followed the 
leader's remarks in which nearly every- 
one present took part. 



At the recent convention of the 
National Shoemakers Association 
which met at Hotel Astor, New York 
City, January 12th. Mr. A. S. Kreider 
of the A. S. Kieider Shoe Company, 
of Annville, was elected treasurer. 
This is a signal honor to the integrity 
and business ability of Mr. Kreider. 
Mr. Kreider is a member of the Execu- 
tive committee of the Board of Trustees 
of Lebanon Valley College. 



The Spendthrift Muses 

He slaved along for several years 
And made a little money, 

He had a host of woes and fears, 
But saved a little money; 

He never had the time to spend 
An evening with some cheerful 
friend 

He kept on to'ling to the end 
And saved a little money. 

He died last week, and fulks now say 

He saved a little money; 
Nobody mourns although he may 

Have saved a little money ; 
I hope that when I come to die 

Folks will not sorn me where I lie, 
Therefore, old scout, I shall not try 

To save a little rmnev. 



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COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, January 31, 1911 



No. 17 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Will You Be at the Banquet? 

If there are any alumni or former 
students of the college living in 
Lebanon County, who have not received 
a • letter concerning the Lebanon 
County banquet, which [will occur on 
February 13, at the Hotel Weimer in 
Lebanon, they will please send their 
names to the secretary of the organiza- 
tion, Elmer L. Haak, Myerstown, Pa., 
at once. Responses to the letters that 
have been sent out are already coming 
in and the prospects are that there will 
be a larger number of people at the 
banquet than last year. Be there 
yourself and urge others to attend. 
Do not wait until it is too late to send 
in your order and your money. All 
requests for places at the banquet 
should be sent to the secretary or a 
member of the committee not later 
than February S. Don't wait. Do it 
no<v. 



Rev. S. K. Wine Passes to Rest 

We are sorry to note the death of 
Rev. S. K. Wine A.M., '81, which 
occurred at his home at Fayetteville 
Saturday January 21. Rev Wine entered 
the ministry immediately after gradua- 
tion as a member of the Virginia Con- 
ference of the United Brethren church 
in which conference he served faith- 
fully until three years ago when he 
was transferred to the Pennsylvania 
Conference of the same church. Since 
then his efforts have not slackened and 
death found him an active worker in 
the cause he loved so well. Rev. 
Wine gave tc his chosen profession a 
devotion and zeal, which commanded 
the respect and love of all and re- 
garded his efforts with a most commen- 
surable degree of success. 

A wife son and daughter survive 
him to whom we offer the heartfelt 
sympathy of his Alma Mater. 



Oratory Recital 

The department of oratory at the 
college gave an interesting recital to 
an appreciative audience on Thursday 
evening in the auditorium of the con- 
servatory. The program showed that 
great care was used in choosing the 
selections and this fact made it very 
entertaining to every one present. 
Their was noticed a marked improve- 
ment in the delivery of each performer, 
which speaks well for the manage- 
ment of the department. 

The oratory department of the college 
has proven a good asset since it has 
been so successful during the past 
several years. All persons who can, 
should take lessons in public speaking. 
The following program was rendered; 

Piano— Polonaise in C sharp minor, 
Chop, Miss Marion Light; ""Gentle- 
men, the King!", Robert Barr, John 
W. Ischy; Nydia— (Selection from Last 
Days of Pompeii), Bulwer Lytton 
Helen E. Brightbill; (a) "My, 
Shadow" (b)Tho Lamplighter, Robert 
Louis Steveson, Grace Smitn; The 
Prodigal Son, Richard Harding Davis, 
Verda Snyder; Piano— Air de Ballet, 
Mozkowski, Miss Ruth Engle; Convict 
B 606, Annie Hamilton Donnell, Edna 
E. Yarkers; The Finish of Patsy 
Barnes, P. ul Laurence Dunbar, Nona 
Downey Hockenbury ; Dramatic Sketch 
—Palmistry Study, Irene Stoddard 
Capwel, Kathryn— Helen L. Weidler, 
Jack— John W. Ischy. 

Mathematical Round Table 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
mathematical round table will be held 
Wednesday night February 1, at which 
the following program will be rendered. 

Class Room Use of the Slide Rule, 
R. B. Saylor; Squaring the Circle, 
Earl Loser; Some Properties of the 
Nine Digits, Edna Yarkers. Visitors 
are invited to attend. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday January 31, 6 p. m. —Stu- 
dents Prayer meeting. 

Wednesday, February 1, 7 p. m. — 
Mathematical Round Table. 

Friday, February 3, 7:15 p. m.— 
Societies. 

Sunday February 5, 1 p. m. Chris- 
tian Associations. 



Alumni 




Prof, and Mrs. C. H. Fisher, '04, 
and son of York Pa., visited Mrs. 
Fisher's father Asaph S Light, 
Lebanon, over Saturday and Sunday. 

Rev. W. O. Fries, '82, of Dayton, 
Ohio, conducted chapel exercsies on 
Friday morning and made some very 
interesting remarks. Rev. Fries has 
made many warm friends among the 
members of the student body. We are 
exceedingly glad for the interest he 
has manifested in his Alma Mater. 
These marks of interest on the part 
of the alumni, strengthen the ties of 
affection that bind us to our College. 

Rev. W. 0. Fries, left for his 
home in Dayton Ohio, on Sunday 
evening after a very successful 
season of energenic Evangelistic work 
in the local U. B. church. The best 
wishes of the student body attended 
him. 

Miss Edith Frantz '08 Conservatory, 
will appear in an entertainment 
given by the Hahn Quartette in the 
P. O. S. of A. all Lebanon on the 
evening of February 2 '11. 

Mrs. Geo. D. Gohn '92, of 1023 
South Wayne Ave., Dayton, Ohio, is 
at present confined to her room help- 
less with a fractured spine the result 
of a fall received January 4. The 
"News" extends to her the sympathy 
of her Alma Mater. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fle&us 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
p. R. koontz, '11 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, 'LI 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER. '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

The recent disturkance in the men's 
dormitory is not an outgrowth of bad 
conditions of life there, as may be 
supposed, but only an expression of 
the urgent need of effective student 
government. It is a decided mistake 
to allow the impression that conditions 
there are immoral to be circulated, an 
error that cannot be corrected too 
speedily. 

Conditions in the dormitory have 
never been better in the history of the 
institution. This is not the opinion 
of some chicken-hearted prep or fresh- 
man who has felt a little fear because 
some wholesome advice or stinging 
rebuke has been administered, but the 
honest opinions of those students 
who have known the place for 
a kng period of years and know where- 
of they speak. 

There is no evil there that could not 
be entirely removed if student govern- 
ment were effected. By student 
government we do not mean a syste- 
matic way of tattling, but a system by 
which all minor offenders would be 
punished by the governing body and the 
more serious offenders handed to the 
faculty for action.' 

If such form of government as the 
recent student committee was striving 
to effect were adopted every student 
would secure justice, no one would be 



requested to stoop to the plane of a 
tattler and all offenders would be 
summarily dealt with, and scarcely 
any trouble would devolve upon the 
faculty and authorities of the institu- 
tion. In fact it would stop most 
offenses in the very beginning and 
bring perfect order out of chaos. 

No one can expect a man who has 
any desire to keep his standing with 
the student body to tattle every little 
offense to the authorities. This is 
decidedly against any standard of 
college ethics. Even if the informer's 
convictions are consciencious, he places 
himself in a position in which his 
future influence is marked. All this 
can be removed by proper student 
government. Why not have it ? 



A few weeks ago Prof. J. M. Cole- 
man in addressing the student body 
emphasized the statement, that stu- 
dents should not work too hard and that 
they should try to disallusionize their 
parents and friends concerniug the 
great amount of work that they are com- 
pelled to do. 

Ihe address was unique and interest- 
ing and will long be rmembered by 
those who heard it. The keen wit and 
humor of the Professor drove some 
wholesome thoughts into the mind of 
the loafer and plainly showed him the 
goal toward which such habits tend. 

There is another danger however to- 
ward which we may move with even 
more disastrous effect and that is the 
extreme grind. Doubtless the Pro- 
fessor had this in mind as well as its 
opposite. 

Some students seem to think that to 
make an A in exams is the highest 
ideal. To this they bend all their 
energies, burn the midnight light and 
spend the hours which should be 
used in healthful recreation in the close 
confinement of their own room pouring 
over books until their eyes grow weary 
and their mind becomes cloudy. A 
student may stand this a part of, or 
even during all his college course with- 
out any apparent physical harm, but 
even then he has missed the greater part 
of a college course, the association with 
a body of men, whose ideals are the 
highest. 

Of course by men of high ideals we do 
not mean men with saintly smile or 
servile nature, but we mean men who 



will have convitions and dare to express 
them. They may be in opposition to some 
other fellow's view, but does that con- 
demn them? |It is this clashing of 
ideals that makes men, and a man of 
that kind even if he does make a little 
noise occasionally is worth as much to 
any school as twenty men who pen 
themselves in their rooms and get a 
nervous shock each time they hear a 
footstep outside. 

The man who looks at exams in a 
philosophical way does not see a night- 
mare in them. He has his fun and in 
the end makes as good marks as the 
grind. His personality is much 
stronger and even if in the eyes 
of some consevatives he is a rascal and 
one to be curbed and "disciplined" he 
will eventually prove his worth. We 
need pilots as well as ballast in the 
great voyages cf life. 

Y. W. C. A. 

"Duty Under Difficulty" was the 
subject discussed in the Sunday after- 
noon meeting. Miss Bertha Spessard 
led the meeting. She showed very 
clearly and forcibly the difficulties to 
be overcome by the christian in the 
performance of her duty. She em- 
phasized the importance of engaging 
in christian warfare as a good soldier 
of Christ Jesus. 

In the discussion which followed 
many excellent thoughts were presented 
among other things, the following 
beautiful quotation from Emerson was 
quoted : 

So nigh is grandeur to our dust, 
So near is God to man, 
When Duty whispers low "Thou 
must, ' ' 

The Youth replies, "I can " 
Another impressive thought brought 
out was that faithful performance of 
duty means friendship with Christ. 
Jesus said ' ' Ye are my friends if ye do 
whatsoever I have commanded you." 

The spirit of the meetings lately 
has been fine. Girls lets make the 
attendance better too. 

Married 

Mr. A. G. Smith, '01, of Baltimore, 
Md , was married to Miss Florence A. 
Williams, on Tuesday evening, January 
24 by the Rev. C. C. Gohn, '02. pastor 
of Otterbein Memorial U. B. church, 
Baltimore. The "NEWS" offers Mr. 
Smith the congratulations of his Alma 
Mater. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Piano solo, Naomi Ely ; Tolstoi as a 
'Man, Vera Myers; Current Events, 
Catharine Moser; Tolstoi as a Writer, 
Lottie Spessard; Vocal Solo, Eva 
Foltz; Debate, Resolved, that there 
should be two Literary Societies for 
girls at Lebanon Valley. Affirma- 
tive, Helen Weidler, Mary Spayd. 
Negative, Nellie Seltzer, Grace Simth; 
Did you Ever? Clara Horn; Piano 
Solo, Sara Strickler. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Resume, Maurice Leister; Outlook 
for Baseball season, E. Kephart 
Boughter; Debate: Resolved, that 
college hazing should be abolished; 
Affirmative, T. J. Leipold, Paul 
Hummel. Negative, J. K. Leh- 
man, I. K. Potter; Vocal Solo, P. R. 
Koontz ; John K. Tener, Ewdard Smith. 
KALOZETEAN 
Comparison of the Humor of 
Socrates and Franklin, William 0. 
Ellis; My Philosophy of Life, Phares 
M. Holdeman ; Quartette, Mason Long, 
Warren Hayes, Frank Shearer, Phares 
Gibble; Oration, "Self Reliance", 
David E. Young; Debate: Resolved 
that the grandfather's act witholding 
the right of suffrage from the negro 
should be repealed. Affirmative, 
Donald Keister, Charles Ulrich. Nega- 
tive, James Miller, Harry Charlton; 
Kalo Song, by Society; Freshman im- 
pressions of mid-year examinations, 
Charles Arndt; Kalo orchestra, 
Shearer, Light, Long, Strickler. 



Y. M. C. A. 

We were very much disappointed in 
not having Dr. W. 0. Fries to address 
the meeting on Sunday. Dr. Fries was 
not able to attend and we realize that 
we have missed a rare treat. When it 
was learned that the speaker could not 
come, the meeting was directed by 
Titus Leibold, a member of the devo- 
tional committee. Mr. Leibold took 
for his subject "Conformity to The 
Religion of Jesus Christ," and used 
as a scripture lesson a portion of 
Romans 12. 

Dr, Kiester was present and gave 
us a good talk upon the subject. He 
said in part. Truth is in divine harmony 
with the will of God, God is the 
primal cause of all you see. Go to the 
centre. Be built from within. One's 
outside life is but an expression of the 
inner life. Man is a unitary being 
and as such needs the greatest possible 
care. The little child may be most 
beautiful thing in the world but it is 
but the unfolding of this unitary 
being. The thing for man to do is to 
go alone somewhere and consecrate him- 
self to God and His service 

The discussion of the subject con- 
tinued and was very interesting to all 
We are glad to see such an interest 
manifested as was shown in the con- 
sideration of this great subject 



Conservatory Notes 

The seniors of the conservatory 
played for the chapel services during 
the past week. 

It is urged that the music students 
attend the " Hahn Quartette" concert. 
The leader of this quartette is professor 
of violin in a Philadelphia school. 
Miss Edith Frantz, '08, will be their 
soloist. 

A number of the conservatory 
students have been ill during the week 
and were unable to report at classes. 

Miss Helen Brightbil is spending the 
week end at Tremont. 

Don't mind the rain, "Get Busy," 
Recital season is fast approaching and 
we want to make this one the best the 
onservatory has ever had. 



A. 0. Kauffman, '11, visited his 
home at Dallastown Pa., over Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

Prof. H. E. Wanner, of the Chemi- 
stry Department, spent a few days 
in Philadelphia prior to the open- 
ing of the second semesters work. 

C. C. Smith, '12, while spending a 
few days at York, is endeavoring to 
secure a coach for baseball next season. 
Sincere hopes for his success in this 
matter attend him. 



[WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
I European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



Items of Interest 



Forrest Hensel, '12, and Guy Win- 
gerd, '12, took a pleasure trip to 
Harrisburg, on Saturday, to relieve 
their nerves after the strain of semes- 
ter exams. 

Oliver Butterwick, '12, and Leray 
B Harnish, '14, advertising special- 
ists made a business trip to Lebanon 
Saturday. 

Prof. H. H. Shenk Dean spent Satur- 
day in Philadelphia on business. 

E. A. Spessard, '11. n ade a business 
trip to Middletown, on Saturday. 

V. D. Mulhollen, '13, and A H. 
Weigel, ,13, visited Lebanon on Satur- 
day and made a call on their old friend 
Mark Holtzman, of the Lebanon Y. 
M. C. A. 

Lizzie Lau, '12, spent the week end 
with Carrie Light, '12, at the latters 
home in Jonestown, Pa. 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



An Exceptionally Good Business 
Opportunity for a College Man 

A well established and good paying Publishing 
Business requiring only a modest capital can be 
secured on favorable terms. An unusually good 
opening. Address: R. C. BARNES, 14 N. 
1 3th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



The 



Spalding 

TRADE MARK 




Is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Are the largest 
manufacturers in 
the world of 

Official 
Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

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teres t - 
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of the Spalding 
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i 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Miss Dodge, Professor of Latin and 
French spent several days during the 
past week visiting friends in New 
Haven and New York City. 

P. R. Koontz, '11, filled the pulpit 
of Rev. A. N. Horn. Enola on Sunday. 

W. Murray preached at Hebron U. 
B. church on Saturday evening. Rev. 
0. T. Ehrhart, '11, is pastor of this 
church. 

Rev. Mark H. Wert, a former 
student now stationed at Intercourse 
Pa., renewed his subscription to the 
"NEWS" during the past week. 
Rev. Wert has had fifteen accessions 
to the church since the beginning of 
the conference year. 



Ministerium Organized 

A new ministerium, composed of the 
United Brethren pastors of Annviile, 
Lebanon and vicinity was organized 
last Thursday in the Lebanon Y. M. 
C. A. Many of the members of this 
organization are alumni anj friends of 
the college. The officers elected to 
serve the association are as follows: 
President, Rev. D. E. Long, Field 
Secretary of Lebanon Valley College; 
Secretary and Treasurer, Rev. Joseph 
Daugherty, pastor of Myerstown U. 
B. Church, Executive committee, 
Revs. E. O. Burtner, Palmjra, D. S. 
Longenecker, Lebanon, and President 
Lawrence Keister. Among the local 
ministers present at the meeting were 
Revs. Spayd, Keister, Long, White 
and Holdeman. Dr. W. 0. Fries, 
who is assisting Rev. Spayd in the 
Evangelistic services at the local 
church, was also present. 



Prof. Kreider Lectures 

Dr. D. Albert Kreider, Ph.D., '82 
of the department of Physics of Yale 
University, on tho evening of January 
12 was honored by an informal recep- 
tion and smoker at the University 
Club at Albany N. Y., following a 
lecture delivered by him on "The 
Phenomena of the Atmosphere. " 

Woman's Board 

The next regular meeting of the 
Woman's Board of Lebanon Valley 
College will meet at the home of Mrs. 
H. H. Shenk on Wednesday afternoon, 
Feb. 1st at 3 o'clock. 



aCebanon Valley 
Coileffe 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Musi'c, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall arc under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
jCuwrence Jfei'ster, ZPres. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

The Journal PublishingCo. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

CHRISTY- ' 'NIFTY" 
POST CARDS 

Stock from New York and Paris 

H. E. SPESSARD'S BOOK STORE 

Journal Building ANNVILLE, PA. 

Hmwille national Bank 

Capital - - $100,000.00 
" Surplus and Undi- 
vided Profits 122,000.00 
Deposits - - 400,000.00 
Resources - 080,000.00 

3 Per Cent. Paid on Special Deposits 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

%, SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annviile, Pa. 



Students' Discount 



Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 



Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward "90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

/Represented at College 

Full line of College Post Cards, 
^ | Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets, 

Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

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COLLEGE JiaWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, FebPuapy 7, 1911 fio. 18 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Mathematical Round Table 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Mathematical Round Table was held 
on Wednesday evening February 1st in 
Prof. Lehman's lecture room. Avery 
interesting program was rendered to 
the great delight of all present. 
Roger B. Saylor, president of the 
Round Table gave us an illustrated 
talk upon "Class-Room Use of the 
Slide Rule." Many of us had never 
seen such a contrivance and were 
greatly benefited by the careful clear 
explanation of its practical use. This 
was followed by a splendid discussion 
of that old problem of "Squaring the 
Circle" by Earl Loser. Miss Edna 
Yarkers gave us new and peculiar 
instances of special "Properties of the 
Nine Digits." We were surprised 
at the strange and almost impossible 
things can apparently be done by 
different manipulations of these nine 
figures. The whole program was 
decidedly the best that has been given 
this year. 

Following the program the Round 
Table proeeded into business session. 
The following officers were elected : 
President, Artus O. Kauffman ; Vice 
President, Samuel 0. Grimm; Secre- 
tary, Edith Lehman : Treasurer, Paul 
Luser. It was decided to begin prepara- 
tions for a special anniversary occasion 
instead of our regular program next 
month. 



Biological Field Club 

PROGRAM FOR FEB. 8 
Identification of local ferns, William 
0. Ellis; Mid-winter habits of the 
Deermoupe, Chester E. Rettew; 
Collection of Basidia Fungi, J. W. 
IschyjHow wasps build their nests, 
Carrie Light; Observations concerning 
the Robin's nest. Discussion: The 
importance of the study of biology to 
the student. 



Social 

The party on Saturday evening, given 
in the college parlors by the ladies of 
the dormitory was one of the most en- 
joyable social events of the college 
year. The reception was held in 
honor of Miss Mary B. Musser, a mem- 
ber of the class of 1910 and now teach- 
ing Latin, French and Music in the 
High School at Clayton, N. J. 

The evening was pleasantly spent in 
playing games of various kinds. 
There were quite a number of guessing 
contests which furnished much amuse- 
ment for the ladies and gentlemen in 
attendance. The lucky contestants 
were awarded handsome and appro- 
priate prizes. They were : Messrs. John 
Karl Lehman, '11, Warren Hayes, '14, 
and Miss Edith Morrison, '14. 

After the elegant refreshments were 
served, Ear) A. Speessard. '11, en- 
livened the occasion by playing on the 
piano many of our familiar college 
songs. Miss Brown instructor in 
voice, and Miss Musser the guest of 
honor, followed with vocal solos, while 
Miss Adams, head of the department 
of oratory gave two splendid and in- 
teresting readings. 



Conservatory Notes 

Prof, and Mrs. Sheldon, Miss Brown 
and a number of conservatory students 
attended the concert given by the 
"Hahn Quartette" of Philadelphia. 

Misses Naoma Ely and Evelyn Weid- 
man, are spending the week end at 
their homes. 

Mr. James Balthaser, former student 
of the conservatory, spent a few days 
with friends here. 



At a recent business meeting the 
Senior class elected the following 
officers for the second semester: Pre- 
sident, J. K. Lehman, Vice .President, 
W. 0. Ellis, Secretary, P. R. Koontz. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday February 7, 6 p. m.— stu- 
dents prayer meeting. 

Wednesday, February 8,-7 :15 p. m. 
Bological Field Club. 

Friday, 7:15 p. m.— Societies. 




Alumni 




M. 0. Billow, '08, is working for 
the Scar Borough Engraving Co. , of 
Indinapolis, Ind. 

A. D. Flook, '09, is connceted with 
the Farmer's Mutal exchange, of 
Meyer3town, Md. 

J. B. Hambright, '06, is supervising 
principal , of the Englishtown, schools, 
N. J. 

C. W. Waughtel, '01, is in real 
estate business in Georgia and Florida. 

H. K. Bomberger, '10, is principal 
of the Ligonier Boro schools. 

Allen U. Baer, '98, pastor of con- 
gregational church in Clark, South 
Dakota, is an applicant for the appoint- 
ment for chaplain in the U. S. Army. 

Mr. Baer received the degree of M. 
S. from Westfield college in 1906 and 
the degree of M, A. from the State 
University of South Dakota in 1908. 

Mary B. Musser, '10, teacher in 
the High School in Clayton, New 
Jersey, spent several days here, with 
friends in the Girl's Dormitories. 

George Albright, '02, who was 
severely injured some time ago in tha 
Enola freight yards, died at the Har- 
risburg Hospital several days ago as 
a result of his injuries. 

Chas. W. Plummer, '10, is the 
author of an interesting article entitled 
"Ministerial Duties," in the Relig- 
ious Telescope last week. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College l^ecus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 - 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '1L 

F. K. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, ' L2 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. BRUNNER, '11, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK 'L2 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cfs. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Lebanon Valley has had its weak- 
nesses, does have today. But what 
college has not! Many a college that 
became heir to as dark vicissitudes as 
has ours, has died and today we no 
more hear of them. Thanks to the pow- 
ers that have kept us from a funeral. 
Who does not know that it often takes 
the sacrifice of generation after genera- 
tion to establish a reputation that has 
once been juggled with? 

What is our joy then, when we see 
some real and valuable improvements 
presented. Not a worthy anJ honest 
student failed to secretly cry hurrah! 
when the absence rules were lately 
announced. Every one feels today 
that this step is decidedly up to date 
and that the lack of absence limita- 
tions is a silly mistake for us to 
tolerate when we are able to enforce 
them. The student who forms the evil 
habit of absenting himself from recita- 
tion whenever he feels so disposed, 
finds himself quite unable to bind him- 
self to rule when later in life he is 
put on his own initiative. 

Many students who have spent 
several years at Lebanon Valley and 
have fallen into this so open habit, 
will experience some disappointment 
and perhaps chagrin because of the late 
restrictions, but let them be a little 
more alert to their duty towards the 



welfare of the whole mass of students. 
And as students eager to do the right 
thing for our college, we gladly and 
cheerfully promise our best care to 
follow these new laws, because we 
believe in them; but we also hope that 
those whose power it is to reprimand 
and punish, will be patiently indulgent 
toward our weaknesses. We have some 
of us, formed the evil habit that was 
so open and free to us, but we are not 
infallible in attempts at correction. 
Every student hails with delight any 
sensible attempt to establish law and 
order at this institution, and not one 
will murmer if he is sent home on 
account of fifteen unexcused absences, 
for then he will be conscious of a 
just cause for such a punishment. 

We fondly anticipate many more 
such gradual and sound efforts at im- 
provement of the name and character 
of our alma-mater and promise our 
heartiest support of any other step 
that may in the future be taken as 
sensible as was this last. 

Inter-Collegiate Prohibition 
Contest 

One year has elapsed since a secre- 
tary of the Intercollegiate Prohibition 
Association called together those stu- 
dents of our college, who were in- 
terested in a study of the liquor ques- 
tion, considered as a social problem. A 
local organization with an enrollment 
which was a credit to our college was 
effected, under the constitution of the 
intercollegiate prohibition associa- 
tion. We took our place in the rank 
with the other colleges, as the baby 
league: yet, we won at the stale 
contest (held at Albright College) 
several months later, an honor for our 
alma mater. 

If we should review the purpose of 
this association of national importance, 
we would emphatically emphasize, 
that it is not to try to help wipe out 
and abolish the saloon by any big stick 
method, and then, by mere insane, in- 
toxicating enthusiasm and irrational 
means, hope to realize an Utopian 
state, where we may rest on feathery 
beds of ease; but the reason that this 
association has been organized in the 
American colleges, and backed by men 
of wealth, influence, and integrity, 
is jusu to create among the students 
of our American colleges and universi- 



ties, an intense and sane INTEREST, 
in the liquor problem that is confron- 
ting our nation to-day. Then second, 
to awaken in the college student of 
America an alive patriotism for his 
country, that will stimulate in him a 
keener sense of is duty to his God, 
and his obligation of service to his 
fellowmen; and as a natural sequence 
of all, to arouse in him a deep heart 
felt interest in WORKING OUT the 
most sane, rational and practical 
SOLUTION of the liquor problem. 

Is the liquor problem, in its very 
nature, broad and vital enough to 
deserve any of our time or considera- 
tion, from a moral economic and social 
standpoint? Should the saloon be 
a licensed institution? Is prohibition 
a solution for the problem? If not 
what better solution would you sug- 
gest? Such is the character of the 
many questions that are envolved in 
the solution of the liquor problem. 

As one of the means to the end, 
each year there are held by the inter- 
collegiate association, four series of 
oratorical contest :— the local, state, 
interstate and national contests. The 
prizes for the locals are determined, 
by the different local leagues; The 
state first-prize is $50; Interstate 
first-prize $150, and the National 
prize $500. 

The winners of the local contest of 
each state, contend in their respective 
state contest for the state prizes. The 
winners of the state contests, meet in 
several different interstate contest. 
(The first prize of each contest is $150. ) 
The winners of the interstate contests 
test in a national contest for the $500 
prize. Throughout the series of con- 
tests, each winning orator uses the 
same oration (with probably a few 
changes) that he delivered at the first 
contest of the series. 

Mr. Amos Weigle, L. V. C, '12, 
had the honor of winning Pennsyl- 
vania's $50 prize, and hence, was her 
representative in the interstate con- 
test. 

We have the honor of entertaining 
this year the state contest and conven- 
tion at Lebanon Valley College. The* 
exact date for the contest, has not been 
determined but it will fall between 
April 16th and May 1st. 

We ask for the loyal support and 
hearty cooperation of not only the 



COLLEGE KEWS 



members of our league, but we ask the 
same of the President and Faculty of our 
institution, of every loyal son, daugh- 
ter and friend of L. V. C, in order 
that this contest and convention may 
be a great success, ^and that our visi- 
tors may experience while within the 
walls of our institution, that old 
Lebanon Valley spirit. Let us give 
them nothing less than the same hospi- 
tible reception that every visitor dele- 
gate, and orator received at the state 
contest held last year at Albright 
College. 

All students desiring to enter this 
contest report not later than February 
10th to Lester L. Spessard. There 
will be no local contest, our orator will 
be chcsen from the applicants, by the 
league together with the suggestion of 
an impartial committee. 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Resume, Irvin Kreider; Original 
Story, J. Curry; Debate: Resolved 
that the employer is justified in 
sharing profits with the employee. 
Affirmative, Oliver Butterwick, John 
Shannon Negative, Edward Marshall, 
N. B. S. Thomas; Piano Solo, E. 
K. Boughter; St Valentines Day, 
Gideon Blouch. 

CLIONIAN 
Piano Solo, Maude Kerschner; 
Current Events. Edith Morrison; 
Original Poem, Sara Zimmerman; 
Piano Duet, Katie Gingrich, Anna 
Fry; Biography of Lincoln, Ruth 
V. Engle; Reading, Edna Yarkers ; 
Piano Solo, Ruth Detwiler; Olive 
Branch, Editor. 

KALOZETEAN 
Eulogy on Lincoln, Paul Strickler; 
America, Society; Lincoln's second 



Inaugural, Edgar Landis Oration, 
"The Future of our' Republic," Carl 
Schmidt; Octette; Sketch, W. D. Biev- 
erand*. R. Kennedy; Anecdotes of 
Lincoln, Victor Heffelfinger; Kalo 
Orchestra. 



Ministerial Association 

The regular meeting of the College 
Ministerium was held Thursday even- 
ing in the Men's Dormitory. The 
attendance was large, and the interest 
good. Besides routine business, 
officers were elected for the second 
semester. The paper of the evening 
was read by W. L. Murray, and was 
much appreciated. Prof. Shroyer was 
present and made appropriate remarks. 
An effort is being made to have a 
minister from ^Lebanon address the 
next meeting, which will be held 
February 16. The officers elected 
were : President, P. R Koontz; Vice 
Preisdent, A. S. Beckley: Secretary, 
W. L. Murray; Treasurer, G. L. 
Blouch. 



Woman's Board 

The Woman's board of Lebanon 
Valley College met last Wednesday at 
the home of Mrs. H. H. Shenk. A 
large number were present, and plans 
discussed for a concert to be given some 
time in March by the music and ora- 
tory students for the benefit of the 
Board's funds. 




Items of Interest 



S. O. Grimm, '12, editor of the 1912 
"Bizarre" spsnt Saturday on business 
in York. 

Cnarles H, Ulrich, '13, has stopped 
school for this year, but expects to 
resume his studies next fall. 



Fill out and return to Business Manager 
Enclosed find for which please | ^j^, j 

my subscription for the "College News" for years. 



NAME 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



W. R. Dunlap returned to school 
last week after an absence of about 
a month. 

Rev. Paul D. Witrnan, pastor of 
the first Lutheran Church, conducted 
Chapel last Friday morning. 

A class in Oratory for Freshmen has 
been started. Other college students 
may also enter this class if they choose. 

Miss Adams, Director of the Oratory 
department, teaches twice a week in 
the Lebanon High School. 

Mark G. Holtzman, a former stduent, 
was a college visitor on Sunday. . 

L. B. Harnish. '14, visited at the 
home of his cousin, Rev. E. 0. 
Burtner, at Palmra last Thursday. 

Misses Lizzie Lau, '12, and Vera 
Meyers, have been confined to their 
rooms several days with an attack of 
the grippe. 



Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. 

The monthly joint session of the 
Christian Associations was held in the 
assembly room of the Carnegie Library 
on Sunday afternoon. A large number 
of students were present to enjoy the 
well prepared program. The meeting 
was in charge of J. C. Shively, whose 
brother, Rev. B. F. Shievly, is at pre- 
sent in the Japan mission fields. Mr. 
Shively very ably traced the U. B. 
missionary movement in Japan from 
its beginning up to the present. I.. 
A. Rodes rendered a very beautiful 
solo entitled "O Master Takes us 
Through the dates." Miss Lehman 
read an interesting paper on "The 
Condition of Missions in Japan. " She 
showed the difficulty of civilization in 
gaining its first foothold, and the 
present strife between Buddhism and 
Christianity. However wherever the 
Y. M. (J. A. has taken a hold, it has 
gained largely over Buddhism. The 
Bible has been in Japan for a period 
of twenty years. At present there are 
about a million people reading Japanese 
Bibles. Miss Lehman reminded us 
that the U. B. missionary movement 
in Japan was started in 1895 by a 
former Lebanon Valley student. 

C. E. Rettew made a short address 
on "The Needs of Mission in Japan." 
He said the missions need our sympathy 
in prayers and money. The church 
should gain over the population. The 
need of more and better education was 
also emphasized. 



jCebanon 7/allei/ 
College 



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Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
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Cases and 
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COIiIiEGE fi^'S 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume I I. flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, Febfmarry 14, 1911 flo. 19 

E ntered as second-class mutter November 12. 1910, at the post ofllce at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Second Annual Banquet 
Lebanon Co. Association 

The second annual banquet of the 
Lebanon Valley College Association 
for Lebanon County was held at Hotel 
Weimar, Lebanon, Monday evening, 
February 13, 1911, with an attendance 
of seventy-four persons. The Associa- 
tion is composed of the Alumni and 
former students of Lebanon Valley 
residing within the county. The ban- 
quet hall was elaborately decorated 
with college colors, palms and cut 
flowers, and presented a beautiful ap- 
pearance. 

The Association was reorganized at 
this time with the election of the 
following officers: President, Prof. 
E. M. Balsbaugh, Principal of Lebanon 
High School; Vice President, Prof. A. 
E. Shroyer, Prof, of Bible and Greek, 
Lebanon Valley College; Secretary 
Treasurer, Elmer Haak, Myerstown. 

A most pleasing feature of the 
occasion was the splendid menu which 
was served, which was as follows : 
Oyster cocktails 
Oysterettes Horseradish 

Bisque of tomato 
Salted almonds Celery 
Salted peanuts Olives 
Broiled fresh shad 
Pommes monoplane 
Roast young turkey Cranberry sauce 
Bermuda potatoes Pettis pois 
Candied sweet potatoes 
Punch a la Lebanon Valley 
Chicken salad 
Neufchatel cheese Saratoga crackers 
Neapolitan ice cream 
Marble cake 
Fruit 
Coffee 

After the inner man was cared for, 
Prof. H. H. Shenk took matters in 
hand as Toastaster for the occasion. 
He very ably introduced each of the 
speakers who answered toasts which 
were much appreciated by every one 
present. Dr. Lawrence Keister, 



President of Lebanon Valley College, 
spoke on "The Biggest Thing 1 Know. ' ' 
The "Thing" emphasized was the im- 
mediate need of the college, namely, a 
Gymnasium, a larger endowment, and 
a larger student-body and faculty. 
All these are not only immediate, but 
also possible needs. David W. Sie- 
grist, Editor of the Lebanon ' ' Report, ' ' 
was next introduced, and spoke on 
"The Times and the Man." His 
main thought was that as the times 
advance over years past, so men must 
advance to cope with the perplexing 
situations. The last speaker of the 
evening was John R. Geyer, Esq., 
'98, whose subject was "The Alumnus 
in Dauphin." Mr. Geyer kept his 
audience in a continual roar with his 
keen wit and humor. 

Every person present agreed that 
this occasion was in every way a 
success, and instrumental for the 
betterment of Lebanon Valley College. 

The following is a list of the persons 
present : 

Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Keister, 
Prof, and Mrs. Balsbaugh, Prof, and 
Mrs. Shenk, John R. Geyer, David W. 
Siegrist, Mr. and Mrs. J. Walter 
Esbenshade, Mr?. Aaron Kreider, Dr. 
and Mrs. Brunner, M.P. Spangler, Miss 
Sara Helm, Miss Lucy Seltzer, Miss 
Magdalene Strickler, Miss Cecelia 
Bohr, Miss Anna Kreider, Prof. H. E. 
Wanner, Prof, and Mrs. Schroyer, 
Prof, and Mrs. Spessard, Mr. and 
Mrs. David H. Meyer, Mr. and Mr3. 
David Snavely, Miss Edith Frantz, J. 
L. Kreider, J. P. Batdorf, Katie Kline, 
Mrs. Mary Stehman, A. K. Mills, D. 

E. Long, Miss Louise Preston Dodge, 
Rev. Joseph Daugherty, Miss Mabelle 
Adams, Dr. and Mrs. Seth A. Light, 
Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Haak, Mr. and 
Mrs. E. L. Haak, Miss Souders, Miss 
Ella Moyer, Maj. H. P. Moyer, M. E. 
Donough, Dr. and Mrs. Maulfair, A. 

F. Ward, John A. Seltzer, Alvin 



Calendar. 

luesday, February 14, 6 p. m.— 
Students Prayer Meeting; 8 p.m.— 
Kalozetean Masquerade Party. 

Thursday, February 1G, 6 p. m.— 
Ministerial meeting at the home of A. 
S. Beckley, Maple Street. 

Friday, February 15, 7:15 p. m.— 
Literary Societies. 

Saturday, February 18, 7:45 p.m. 
—Star Course, Signor Bartolotte Com- 
pany. 

Sunday, February 19, 1 p. m.— 
Christian Associations. 



Kettering, M. H. Bachman, Herbert 
Manbeck, Fred W. Light, Miss Parks, 
Miss Mary Schlichter, Mark Holtzman, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Hunsicker, Jr., 
Rev. S. E. Rupp, Miss Rupp, Mr. and 
Mrs. C. J. Baar, Prof, and Mrs. S. H. 
Derickson, Mrs. Vallerchamp, Mr. and 
Mrs. Wallace Altenderfer, Mr. and 
Mrs. E. E. McCurdy, Mr. and Mrs. U. 
F. Strickler. 



Masquerade Party 

The annual Masquerade given by the 
Kalozetean Literary Society on St. 
Valentine's Day will be observed Fe- 
bruary 14, in the halls of the society. 
Judging from previous years and from 
the prospects for this year the event 
will be well attended by the student 
body and by numerous visitors from 
the neighboring towns. 

The society is putting forth every 
effort to make it a success. Two hun- 
dred and fifty invitations were mailed 
to the numerous friends of the college. 

The decorating committee is at work 
on the hall, while the entertainment 
for the occasion has by no means been 
neglected. Prizes will be offered for 
the most original and unique costumes. 
Refreshments will be served. Every- 
one is invited to attend. Come and 
identify your friends. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fierjus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY. '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 
OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

During the present month we cele- 
brate the birthdays of some of the 
greatest men America ever produced. 
Their lives and memories are brought 
before us with renewed force, and we 
are glad for all thej have meant to us 
and to our country. Not only from a 
militaiy and diplomatic standpoint, 
but from a literary as well, has the 
month of February been kind to us. 

We admire the farsightedness and 
courage of the man who, in the face 
of the greatest difficulties and under 
the most trying circumstances, became 
the hero of Valley Forge. * Other 
men have also been of value to our 
beloved country, and yet, considering 
them all, v\ho would suppress a 
"hurrah," or fail to lift his hat high, 
\were General Washington to pass by? 

Then, too, in the terrible crisis of 
the Civil War, the famous "RaiJ- 
splitter" forged to the front. It was 
Abraham Lincoln who piloted the Ship 
of State through the stormy seas which 
were to tell " whether that nation or any 
nation so conceived, and so dedicated can 
long endure." When foreign nations 
seemed opposed to his measures, and 
his army was being hard pressed, it 
was his true manhood and perseverance 
which encouraged the Boys in Blue to 
press on to victory. His memory is 
still more sacred to us because of his 



premature death caused by the bullet 
of the cruel assassin. 

In our list of great men this month 
comes the name of Horace Greeley. 
Much of his strength lay in his powers 
as a journalist. As father of the 
"New York Tribune" he was a firm 
supporter of Lincoln and the Union. 
He is also noted as being one of the 
founders of the Republican party. 

February also presents us with a 
great military leader of later date 
than Washington in the person of 
William Tecumseh Sherman. Severe 
was the criticism on his famous march, 
but possibly without it and its results, 
the cause of the Union would bave 
been lost. We admire him for his 
generalship, f^r he was a born leader 
of men. 

We turn now from the paths of war 
and statesmanship to a quieter walk 
in life, and the portrait of Henry 
Wadsworth LongfellGW is brought 
before our eyes. Although all his 
works are not great as literary pro- 
ductions, yet they contain much that 
is beautiful, and much that is given 
place in the hearts of the American 
people. 

Each of these men surely had their 
faults, as each of us have, and that is' 
human. Overlooking them, however, 
there is much in the lives of every 
man mentioned which we can extract 
and embody in our own characters. 




Prof. Jesse M. Hostetter, '05, is 
principal of the Avonmore, Pa., High 
School. We are glad to learn that 
Prof. Hostetter has regained sufficient 
health to engage in active educational 
work again. For two years after gradua- 
tion he was unable to assume active du - 
ties owing to ill health. He has shown 
his loyalty to his Alma Mater by sending 
in a l'st of the members of his senior 
class, a number of whom he is urging 
to attend Lebanon Valley next year. 

Mrs. George D. Go.hn, '92, of Day- 
ton, Ohio, whose serious accident was 
noted in these columns a few weeks 
ago, is again able to be about the 
house. We hope for her speedy re- 
covery. 



Dr. Donald J. Cowling, '02, Presi- 
dent of Carleton College, Northfield, 
Minn., is in the midst of a canvassing 
campaign for an endowment of $600,- 
000. The "NEWS" wishes him the 
greatest success. 

F. Allen Rutheiford, '10, a medical 
student at Johns Hopkins University 
writes that work is going well in pre- 
paration for a series nf examinations 
to be given in March. 

Wilber E. Harnish, '10, writes that 
there are 140 students in the High 
School at Cass City, Mich., where he 
is teaching mathematics and science, 
and directing athletics. Mr. Harnish 
reports the work going well, and sends 
best wishes to all his college friends. 

George N. Hoffer, '09. has been 
given charge of the work in Plant 
Physiology and Plant Diseases at 
Purdue University. His work in this 
department will be largely with mem- 
bers of the Senior class of the Univer- 
sity. 

Thos. F. Miller, '01, is at present 
with Underwood and Underwood, of 
New York City, representing the 
Underwood Travel System. 

Prof. Andrew Bender, '06, is complet- 
ing ten hours' work with honors in 
the graduate department of Columbia 
University. Aside from this work 
he is also conducting the work in Me- 
chanics in the Jersey City High School. 
At present Prof. Bender is working 
on Enzymes, one of the hardest sub- 
jects in Organic Chemistry, and also 
has the privilege of performing his 
experiments in the private laboratory 
of Dr. Nelson. 

Miss Connie Oldham, '08, conserva- 
tory, was married recently to Mr. T. 

R. Reynolds. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds 

are at home at Gregory, S. D. 

Roy J. Guyer, 'OS, Physical Director 

of the Marshalltown, Iowa, Y. M. C. 

A., reports his work going very well. 

He has renewed his subscription to the 

"NEWS" which he says he enjoys 

reading very much. 

Dr. M W. Brunner, '01, of Lebanon, 

was a college visitor on Monday after 

noon. 

Grover C. Bair, '10, who was em- 
ployed at the Brooklyn Y. M. C. A. 
is at present assistant secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. at Lorain, Ohio. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



KALOZETEAN 
Current History, Earl George; Piano 
Solo, W. D. Biever ;"Reading, J. Allen 
Watler; Sketch, Arthur Light, John 
Lyter; Oration, Henry Snavely ; 
Debate : Resolved, That free trade 
should b.j established between Canada 
and United States. Affirmative, 
Mason Long, William Stager, Nega- 
tive Boaz Light, Clyde Eby ; Essay, 
Fred Frost; Chorus, Society; 
Examiner, Wm. Dunlap. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
George Washington, Wm. Becker; 
Women Laundry Workers in New York, 
Guy Wingerd; Debate: Resolved, 
That laziness is a disease. Affirma- 
tive, Samuel B. Plummer, Ellis 
Zimmerman ; Negative, J. C. Shively. 
Claude Reddick ;Duetr, Claude Reddick 
Leonard Reddick; Justice Lamar of 
the Supreme Court, H. A. Denlinger. 

CLIONIAN 
Piano Solo, Bertha Spessard ; 
Resume, Edith Lehman; Impromptu 
Contest, Things that im- 

pressed me at the masquerade, Helen 
Brightbill; Vocal Duet, Florence 
Christeson, Mary Spayd ; The Colonial 
Dame and the Twentieth Century 
Woman, Carrie Light; [Should the 
study of chemistry be required of 
women in college, Edna Kilmer; Vocal 
Solo, Maude Kerchner. 



Y. M. C. A. 

There was a very interesting session 
of the Y. M. C. A. on Sunday. The 
leader for the afternoon was Mr. John 
Lehman and his subject was "Walking 
in the Light." He showed in a 
pleasing manner the nature of light 
and illuminated his talk with many 
passages from the scriptures. The 
leader "pointed out the way in which 
we may try to live the perfect life. 

We must get under God's light. 
By this means we may be kept from 
falling; it will keep us on the path 
that leads to the Eternal City. If we 
should get off the path this same light 
may aid us to regain the road to 
Eternal Life. An interesting discussion 
followed bringing out many valuable 
thoughts. These meetings are valuable 
and should be better attended. 




Items of Interest 



Grace Smith spent Saturday and 
Sunday at her home in Shoemakersville. 

Catharine E. Hershey, '12, is spend- 
ing a few days visiting friends in 
Philadelphia. 

Prof. H. E. Wanner visited his 
parents at their home in York over 
Sunday. 

W. L. Murray preached in the 
Clsona U. B. church last Friday 
evening, and in the Hebron church on 
Saturday evening. 

Naomi Ely, returned on Saturday 
evening after spending a week at ner 
home in Hagerstown. 

Edna Kilmer, '12, visited her parents 
at their home in Reading last Sunday. 

C. E. Rettew, '12, preached in the 
Evangelical church of Annville, on 
Sunday evening. Rev. Williams is the 
pastor. 

Lester A. Rodes, '14, spent Satur- 
day and Sunday at his home in 
Wormleysburg. 

Star Course 

The next Star Course number of the 
Y. M. andY. W. C. A., will be given 
Saturday evening, February 18, 1911, 
at eight o'clock. The attraction will 
be The Bartolotte Concert Company. 
The main feature of the program will 
be the famous Italian Tenor, Signor 
Giuseppe Bartolotte, a second 
Caruso. With him are three others, 
two violinists and an impersonator. 
The Company comes highly recommend- 
ed, and a fine performance is promised. 

Box office open for sale of seats 
from 12 :30 to 1 :00 and 6 :00 to 7 :00 p. 
m. every day beginning with Thursday. 
Admission, 35 and 45 cents. Let every 
bodv turn out. 



An Announcement 

The Clionian Literary Society will 
present Miss Adams, Director of the 
Oratory Department, in a recital to be 
given Thursday evening March 9, in 
the college chapel. 

Miss Adams has been doing very 
efficient work in her department and 
everyone will be delighted to have this 
opportunity of hearing her read. 

It will be a rare treat and no one 
ought to miss it. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



Sophs Entertained 

A most pleasant bit of class loyalty 
and good fellowship was shown last 
Wednesday evening when Paul Loser, 
'13, entertained his class at his home 
on Main Street. A very pleasant time 
was enjoyed by every one present. 
The evening was spent in various 
games and amusements. The rooms 
at the Loser home were most taste- 
fully decorated in the class colors, 
crimson and steel. Elegant refresh- 
ments were served at a reasonable 
hour. Before leaving all joined 
heartily in a number of college songs 
and yells. 



Y. W. C. A. 



The hour on Sunday afternoon was 
very profitably spent by the members 
nf the Y. W. C. A. in listening to Miss 
CJippinger read from "The Woman 
who Toils" by Mrs. Van Vorst. 

This book contains the personal ex- 
periences of theauthor, who disguised 
herself as a factory girl and obtained 
work in various factories in different 
parts of the United States. 

Miss Clippinger read parts of Mrs. 
Van Vorst's experience in southern 
cotton mills. It was intensely in- 
teresting, and set forth clearly the 
real life of tne mill workers. 



Lebanon County Club 

On Saturday evening last, the 
Lebanon County Club was entertained 
by the ladies of the club. The soiree 
was held in the Carnegie Library Build- 
ing from eight o'clock until ten-thirty. 
Many amusing games, native to the 
local county were played, and the old 
German songs were sung. Refresh- 
ments were served as at a German 
picnic. 

The social was entirely informal and 
of the forty guests 'present, all spent 
an exhilarating and happy evening. 

Washington's Birthday 

February twenty-second will be ob- 
served as a general holiday at the 
college this year. No classes will 
recite, but instead, special exercises 
will take place in the College Chapel 
under the direction of those students 
who are taking the Historical-Political 
Group. The exercises will be held at 
10:00 a. m. Come and bring your 
friends. An interesting program is 
being prepared. 



aCebanon Valley 
College 



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COLLEGE NEWS 

l'rof S H Dencksou i-io-l? 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, February 21, 1911 fio. 20 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post ofliee at Annville, Pa,, under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Kalo Masquerade 

The masquerade party held by the 
Kalozetean Literary society in their 
halls proved a success and was attend- 
ed by over two hundred students and 
friends. Many people from Lebanon 
and vicinity as well as former students 
from a good distance were in at- 
tendance, which made the occasion a 
more pleasant one. 

At about eight o'clock on Tuesday 
evening the masquers appeared in their 
ridiculous attires. The costumes 
varied from the silks work in colonial 
times to the quaint 'old negro fashions 
still prevalent in this country. The 
majority of those attending the party 
wore costumes from their own pattern. 
Prizes consisting of a Lebanon Valley 
seal watch fob and a Lebanon Valley 
seal pennant were awarded to Earl 
Loser, 13, and to Helen Brightbill re- 
spectively for the unique and original 
costumes. 

Those not receiving prizes but de- 
serving honorable mention were: 
Misses Risser, Frantz, Turbe, Det- 
weiler, Meyer and Bomberger, Messrs. 
Richie, Frantz and Arndt. 

Miss Mae Meyer furnished the music 
for the affair and deserves much credit 
for the success of the occassion. 

The halls were neatly decorated for 
the event with appropriate banners 
and pennants. These few simple de- 
corations were quite in place. 

Refreshments were served, which 
apparently were enjoyed by all. 

The committee on arrangements for 
the Masquerade was Messrs. Ellis, '11, 
Kennedy, '11 and Rettew, '12. 

Lost* 

Chester E. Rettew, '12, lost a valu- 
able signet ring somewhere around the 
college. The loser would kindly ap- 
preciate any information which would 
lead to the recovery of the ring. 



Signor Bartolotta Concert* 

The Signor Bartolotta Concert Com- 
pany was presented on Saturday 
evening by the Star Course committee 
of the Christian Associations as the 
fourth number of the season's Star 
Course. The largest crowd of the 
season assembled in the cnapel in the 
Engle Conservatory and the spirited 
applause left no doubt as to the ap- 
preciation of the varied entertainment. 

Ihe entire program was of a high 
order it being generally agreed that 
this concert was the best one presented 
here for the past several years. 
Signor Bartolotta was at his best, and 
immediately won the complete favor 
of the large audience. His selections 
were heavy, but rendered with great 
ease and expression. The readings 
were also much appreciated. Miss 
Chaffee, the reader, is a graduate of 
Emerson College of Oratory. Her in- 
terpretation of "The Climax" was 
keenly appreciated by every one 
present. 

A splendid feature of the , r progam 
was the performances of Mr. and Mrs. 
Yost witli violin and piano. Mr. Yost 
is an artist with the violin, while Mrs. 
Yost is also very accomplished in both 
violin and piano. 

Many persons present expressed the 
thought that the Signor Bartolotta 
Company would be very acceptable fcr 
a return engagement on the course 
next year. 

St>udent>s Collection 

A Students Collection has been 
started in connection with the class in 
Geology. All students and friends of 
the institution are invited to contribute 
any specimens. The college should 
have a collection containing repre- 
sentative types of the minerals and 
rocks of their immediate locality. 
Any addition to the collection will be 
greatly appreciated. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, February 21, 6 p. m.— 
Prayer Meeting, 8 p. m.— Anniversary 
Mathematical Round Table. 

Wednesday, February 22, Holiday; 
10:00 a. m. —Public exercises in 
College Chapel. 

Friday, February 24, 7:15 p. m. 
Literary Societies. 

Sundaj, February 25, 1 p. m.— 
Christian Associations. 




Miss Ora M. Harnish, '06, Superin- 
tendent of the Burd School Philadelphia 
visited her brother Clair, '12 and en- 
joyed the Bartolotta Concert on Satur- 
day. She later visited her parents in 
Mechanicsburg. 

The new "Choir Anthem," edited 
by Urban H. Hershey, Mus. B., has 
come to our table, an issue greatly to 
the credit uf the author. Mr. Hershey 
was the only graduate of the class 
of '95, in music. 

Max F. Lehman, '07, a student of 
the U. of Pa., visited his parents over 
Sunday. 

Miss Reba Lehman, '00, formerly 
librarian of the Pubilc Library at Con- 
shohocken, is visiting at the home of 
her parents, Prof, and Mrs. Lehman 
until March 1, when she will assume 
her duties as Public Librarian at 
Hazelton, Pa. 

Week of Prayer 

The annual week of Prayer at the 
college will be held during the week 
beginning February 26. This is two 
weeks later than it was observed in 
former years, but the committee in 
charge thought it advisable under the 
Continued on page 3 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College l^ecus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner. Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Please examine the label on your 
paper, and if the date shows that your 
subscription has expired, we would be 
pleased to have you renew at once. 



Competition is the spice of trade, 
but when that compel ition becomes 
cut-throat, the spice becomes 
"bitters." At Lebanon Valley there 
has been a competition for supremacy 
for thirty years between the two male 
societies. Originally each organiza- 
tion was content to express its claims 
and advantages in the only legitimate 
place— the society. Gradually the 
spirit of seclusiveness and self-suffi- 
ciency broadened into the various stu- 
dent functions of the college, until 
today we see the bitter enmity of 
society spirit cropping out in every 
election, every appointment and al- 
most in every word and greeting of 
students. Indeed, it has come to such 
a strait that it is hard for any society- 
man to feel sure that those in authority 
over him are not employing society- 
means against him. So biased has 
become the view-points of the various 
members of the Philokosmian and 
Kalozetean Literary Societies! Is it 
not a deplorable fact, and is the state- 
ment just made not really mild? 

Now what has been the cause of 
such a feeling? The answer which 



we believe viill cover all answers is : 
that theie has been fostered a false 
conception of socalled society spirit. 
This thing of SPIRIT in any organiza- 
tion is worthless and has no meaning 
when it fails to take into consideration 
other organizations outside of itself. 
What should be the appreciation of 
Lebanon Valley SPIKIT if every stu- 
dent were taught to frown down in dis- 
gust upon a student of some other 
college if fate gave them a chance 
meeting? What is the appreciation 
if lesser organizations do the same 
thing? fhete is only one word and that 
scarcely strong enough— disapproval, 
disapproval of dis-interested on- 
lookers. The societies must needs 
depend upon on-lookers for outside 
friends. They cannot expect a speedy 
and lasting cultivation of friendship if 
they are unwilling to meet each other 
on free grounds of amiable justice to- 
ward each other. "War is hell!" and 
when operations assume belligerency, 
we cannot but expect to see the temper- 
ature rise on the battle field. If 
society spirit, that FALSE spirit, at 
L. V. has not reached this point, it is 
not far off. What will be the outcome 
of i'; all and what the advantage? 
There certainly will be no moral ad- 
vantage for either party. Numbers 
and skill in the manipulations of those 
numbers will be the sole aim. When 
one gets in power the other will 
inevitably be spit upon and trampled 
upon. The result will be that the 
pendulum will forever swing back and 
forth murdejously crushing those whom 
it successively strikes. In such a con- 
dition there is no chance for pros- 
perous advancement. Each society 
must spend its hours in fear of the im- 
pending danger. 

But history shows clearly that the 
lights of any land cannot be extinguish- 
ed by mere warlike oppression and 
suppression. Neither will the good 
men of either society be kept down 
when their opponent is in power. 
Iheir active spirits will only serve to 
make the battle hotter. What a 
shame should the societies of Lebanon 
Valley become unfit to be charitable 
and just ; should they so cloud their 
sense of judgement that they cannot 
see the good in their opponent; should 
they only distort and exaggerate the 
evil ! 



Why not be honest with ourselves, 
everyone, and determine that we have 
had as much to do with the bitter 
feelings and unjust acts as the next 
fellow? This spirit has caused a 
marked decrease in college spirit which 
should be genuine in every student. 
This it is that causes disunited action 
in our athletic circles, our Y. M. C. 
A., cur clubs and every place where 
there should be united and consecrated 
effort in behalf of the institution we 
call our alma-mater. 

"Malice towards none, charity to- 
wards all, " should be our motto in- 
dividually. If we keep our society 
efforts strictly within the limits that 
are sacred to each one of us, then the 
greatness in us will have a chance to 
develop and not be slaughtered by per- 
petual strife. The society and society 
alone is the legitimate place to show 
society power. 



Items of Interest 






J 



The following officers were installed 
by the Philokosmian Literary Society 
on Friday evening to serve for the 
coming term, of six weeks : President, 
P. R. Koontz; Vice President, S. 0. 
Grimm; Recording Secretary, E. G. 
Loser; Corresponding Secretary. 
Russell Weidler; Critic. J. K. Leh- 
man; Chaplain, A. 0. Kauffman; 
Pianist, W. L. Murray ; Janitor, Harry 
Denlinger ; Assistants, William Becker 
and Sedic Rine. 

A. H. Weigel, '13, was confined to 
his room for several days last week on 
account of sickness. 

Miss Hazel Quigley, of Red Lion, 
a former student spent some time here 
last week as the guest of Vera Myers. 

W. L. Murray filled the pulpit at 
Shepherdstown U. B. Church over 
Sunday, owing to the illness of the 
pastor, A. H. Weigel, '13. 

The Kalozetean Literary Society 
rendered their program on Thursday 
evening instead of Friday. 

Misses Edna Yarkers, '13, and 
Carrie Light, '12, visited friends in 
Lebanon on Sunday afternoon. 

Miss Ethel Daugherty entertained 
her mother, Mis. S. S. Daugherty, of 
Eilzabethtown, several davs last week. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Phares B. Gibble was the* recipient 
of a splendid donation last week from 
the people of his West Lebanon 
charge. Ihe gifts amounted to fifty 
odd dollars, half of which Mr. Gibble 
received in cash. 

Robert L. Shenk, ex' 12, who has 
been absent from school this year 
owing to a prolonged illness is rapidly 
recovering and contemplates returning 
to school in the fall. 

Friday evening February 18, twenty 
members of the Kalozetean Literary 
Society attended the Anniversary 
exercises of the Neocosmian Literary 
society which were held in the Al- 
bright college chapel at Myerstown. 

Miss Esther Majewski of Windsor, 
was the guest of Clara Horn, '13, over 
Sunday. 

Miss Bertha Bantzell, of Lebanon, a 
student of the Voice Department, was 
the guest of Miss Brown at the Ladies' 
Dormitory on Saturday. 

Leray B. Harnish, '14, Monday 
evening heard J. Raymond Hemminger, 
the Chapman-Alexander soloist sing 
in the Seventh Street Lutheran Church 
Lebanon. Mr. Hemminger is origi- 
nally from Carlisle, 

Chester E. Rettew, '12, filled 
the pulpit of P. M. Holdeman, '11, at 
the Water Works U. B. Church Sunday 
morning. 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 

Piano Solo, E, Mae Meyer; Presi- 
dents' Address, Verda Snyder; Read- 
ing, Edna Yarkers; Vocal Solo, Edith 
Gingrich; What Clio means to us, 
Lizzie Lau ; Sketch, Florence Christe- 
son, Helen Brightbill ; Quartette, Edith 
Lehman, Bertha Spessard, Ora Bach- 
man, Lottie Spessard; Clio Poem, 
Helen Weidler; Clio Song, Society. 
KALOZETEAN 

Washington's Personality, John 
W. Ischy; Essay, George 
WiMiams; Washington's Military 
Record, Charles Arndt; Piano Duet, 
Allen Meyer, Paul Strickler; Debate: 
Resolved, That the human race is in- 
creasing faster than the means of sub- 
sistance rendering poverty and famine 
inevitable, Affirmative, Edward Mutch, 
Frank Shearer. Negative, David 
Young, Robert Light; Quartette, 
Hayes, Shearer, Long, Gibble; Ori- 



ginal Story, Donald Keister; Clarinet 
Solo, Arthur Light; Chorus, Society. 
Visitors welcome. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Parcel's Post System, Eddie Krei- 
der; Julia Ward Howe, W. W. Mc- 
Conel; Debate: Resolved, That the 
Institution of the Recall would -be 
beneficial in the United States, Affirma- 
tive, C. C Smith, Lester Rodes, Nega- 
tive, C. F. Harnish. Landis Klinger ; 
Piano Duet, P. R. Koontz, E. A. 
Spessard; Eulogy, Paul Loser; Living 
Thoughts. Editor. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The Sunday afternoon meeting was 
in charge of Lester Spessard and 
proved to be very interesting. The 
topic discussed was altogether local, it 
being "The Spirit of Christ in the Y.M. 
C. A. among the students of L. V. 
C. " The lesson was taken from the 
twelfth chapter of John. Slips were 
given out, each containing subjects of 
local interest, to be discussed. Sub- 
jects such as Bible Study, moral ques- 
tions, and Christian men in college 
sports, were discussed with much in- 
terest. A large number of fellows 
were present, and a good interest was 
manifested. 



WEEK OF PRAYER 

Continued from page 1 

existing conditions to make the post- 
ponement. This week has always been 
one of the most beneficial to the stu- 
dent body as a whole from the stand- 
point of religious work. Efficient 
leaders have always been procured for 
each evening, and this year is no ex- 
ception to former years. It is very 
important that every student attend 
the meetings, both the general and 
class meetings, every evening, for he 
will be the loser if he does 
not. The separate class meetings 
will be held at various places 
as in previous years for fifteen minutes 
before the general meeting. Don't 
forget this advance notice, but act, 
talk up the week of Prayer, and most 
of all, attend yourself. 

The speakers have been arranged as 
follows : 

Monday evening, Prof. Shroyer. 
Tuesday evening, Prof. Spessard. 
Wednesday evening, Prof. Lehman. 
Thursday evening, Rev. D. E. Long. 
Friday evening, Prof. Shenk. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. was very highly 
favored in having Miss Ora Harnish, 
'06, to address the meeting on Sunday 
afternoon. Miss Harnish is now Sup- 
erintendent of the Burd Orphan 
School at Philadelphia. She had very 
many interesting and helpful things to 
tell us. Being a former student and 
one deeply interested in Y. W. C. A. 
work she is in a position to understand 
the problems with which we have to 
deal. She gave us a heart to heart 
talk on "Making the most of our Op- 
portunities," basing her remarks upon 
the incident recorded in the Bible con- 
cerning Zacchaeus. She said in part: 
"The tendency is too much to drift 
with the tide. It seemed an insig- 
nificant thing for Zacchaeus to climb a 
tree to see the Master pass, but his 
greatest blessing came out of it. Op- 
portunities are not lrcking in this 
world, while we are in college we 
must prepare ourselves to meet those 
opportunities. Be your best and do 
your best, every day." 

Miss Harnish's talk was an inspira- 
tion to all who heard it. The attend- 
ance was splendid. We are glad so 
many were present to enjoy such a 
treat. 



Ministerial Association 

A very interesting meeting of the 
college Ministerial Association was 
held on Thursday evening at the home 
of Mr. A. S. Beck ley, on Maple 
Street. The feature of thd evening 
was an address by Rev. H. E. Miller, 
'99, of Lebanon. The subject of the 
address was, "The Bible Class Move- 
ment, but Whither ?" He said in part: 
"The Bible Class is on the go, but 
whither? To this there is no answer, 
but whither do we want it to go? It 
should go forward to better things; 
outward to the masses; inward to the 
development of the spiritual life. 
There should be one objective of the 
Bible Class and Sunday School, and 
that is the Christianizing of every 
person in the community. The move- 
ment must beChristward if results are 
to follow. Not [only should we work 
for numbers but for Christ." Afttr 
the address an interesting discussion 
followed, conducted by Rev. Miller. 
The session was a most pleasant one, 
and was enjoyed by every member pre- 
sent. 



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COIiLiEGE ^WS 



Volume II. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Febt*uai?y 28, 1911 



Ho. 21 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, I'a., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



St.at»e Convention 

The Forty-third Annual State con- 
vention of the Young Men's Christian 
Association has just been held at West 
Chester from February 23 to 26 in- 
clusive. Four members of our local 
association were in attendance A. 0. 
Kauffman, '11, Samuel 0. Grimm, 
'12, and G. A. Richie, '13, went as 
delegates while E A. Spessard, '11, 
was sent from the state office to act 
as chorister for the sessions of the con- 
vention M. G. Holzman, a former 
student was present as a secretary 
of the Lehanon Association. 

The sessions' of the convention were 
held in the First Presbyterian Church 
at West Chester. The various dele- 
gates were hospitably entertained by 
the good people of the town. The 
town Association served a splendid 
supper to the convention on Thursday 
evening in their hall. 

The convention was one of great 
success and inspiration. There were 
present about 550 delegates from the 
entire state who will return to their 
various fields of labor with a greater 
faith in the effectiveness of the associa- 
tion work and with renewed courage 
and greater determination to push the 
work and make the association a 
mighty factor in the world. Those 
who were present will never forget the 
splendid address delivered by Drs. 
Burns and Nunhall of Germantown, 
Dr. Freemonte of Freakford, and Dr. 
Greene, of West Chester, Dr. Nunhall 
deilvered a famous address upon "The 
Book of Books." 

Lebanon Valley was well represent- 
ed at this convention having had four 
delegates there. Some of our colleges 
had no representatives, while Gettys- 
burg had the greatest number with 
seven delegates. The trip vias a 
splendid one and was greatly enjoyed 
by those who had the opportunity to go. 



Base Ball 

It is hard to say at present just 
what we may expect from our coming 
base ball season. Some of the best 
players of last year have left by gradua- 
tion while a few others have gone to 
other schools to pursue courses not 
offered here. There are some features 
that are very encouraging. Some very 
good new material is at hand which 
promises to develop into good shape. 
The alumni are showing signs of acti- 
vity along athletic lines which will be 
a decided boost to the sports of our 
college. 

When everything is considered the 
outlook is far from discouraging. 
The following schedule has been 
arranged : 

April 1, Mercersburg Academy at 
Mercersburg. 

April 8, Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 

April 11, Delaware College at New- 
ark Del. 

April 22, Albright at Annville. 

April 25, York Tri State at York. 

April 29, Millersville S. N. S. at 
Millersville. 

May 5, Delaware at Annville. 

May 13, Steelton Y. M. C. A. at 
Annville. 

May 20,Millersville at Annville. 

May 27, Open. 

May 30, Albright (two games) at 
Myerstown. 

June 7, Alumni at Annville. 



Second Anniversary 

The second anniversary of the Mathe- 
matical Round Table occurred on 
February twenty first. The members 
of the Round Table celebrated this oc- 
casion by a very pleasant social enter- 
tainment, given in Prof. Lehman's 
recitation room, to which the members 
of the Biulogical Field Club were in- 
vited. A good attendance of both or- 
ganizations was present and the 
evening was spent in playing various 



Calendar. 

Prayer meeting every evening, Mon- 
day to Friday inclusive 6 p. m. 

Thursday, Mar. 2, 7 p. m. —Minister- 
ial Association. 

Friday, March 3, 7:15 p. m.— 
Literary Societies. 

Sunday, March 5, 1 p. m.— Joint 
Session Y. M. and Y, W. C. A. 

games most of which were quite novel 
and original. In these games phases 
which are characteristic of both the 
Biological and Mathematical sciences, 
were represented in a fitting and most 
pleasing manner. The club had many 
guests among whom were Mrs. Leh- 
man, and daughter Reba, Mr. Max 
Lehman and the Misses Spessard. 

After the various games had furni- 
shed much amusement to all present, 
ami the evening was drawing to a 
close, delicious refreshments were 
served. The interest of all continued 
unabated until time for departure 
arrived when all present expressed 
their appreciation of the Round Table's 
hospitality and their earnest wish for 
its continued success. 




Alumni 




Prof. A. E. Shroyer, of Lebanon 
Valley College, filled the pulpit of 
Rev. S. E. Rupp at Trinity U. B. 
church Lebanon Sunday morning. 

Mrs. R. P. Lewars, nee Ella N. 
Black, '96, conservatory, '98, at pre- 
sent residing in Philadelphia under- 
went successful operation for appendi- 
citis recently. Mrs. Lewars is still 
in the hospital but is recovering rapid- 
ly. 

F. E. Sheaffer, '10, and F. A. 
Rutherford, '10, students of Johns 

Continued on page 3 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fierjus 

Issued weekly during - the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. K. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Si?igle Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 rts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

Don't fail to be at your place in 
Chapel Wednesday morning. 

Don't fail to be present atthe class 
and regular prayer services which are 
being held this week. 

Pay your athletic fees remember 
that it takes money to run a baseball 
season. The manager needs your cash. 

With the return of spring weather 
the baseball player begins to stretch 
his muscle and plan for the season 
ahead. The baseball fever is spread- 
ing at Lebanon Valley. 

For a time the outlook for the 
coming season was discouraging, but 
the color of the situation has changed 
xecently and at present the outlook is 
quite promising. 

The alumni have been responding to 
the call for assistance and quite re- 
cently a loyal member has obligated 
himself to collect money to uniform 
cur team. This is no air bubble as 
the goods have already been ordered. 
What is the meaning of this? Simply 
this, thealunmi is becoming interested 
in us and if we wish to return their 
sympathy and cooperation we must 
pu3h our end of the bargain. 

There are a large number of fees 
that have not been paid as yet and the 
money is badly needed in fact necessary 



to produce a winning season. Now if 
we irerit the assistance of the alumni 
we must first help ourselves. The 
situation is such that defeat or success 
rests in the hands of the student body. 
What will be the choice? If we as a 
student body respond the alumni will 
do greater things. Let us wake up 
and pay our fees to the man. 

Although no definite statements can 
be made concerning the team the 
material in hand looks very good, and 
if the student body meets the proposi- 
tion that is set before them squarely, 
success will be sure to follow. Pay 
all athletic fees. 

There is a growing sense of unity 
among the alumni of Lebanon Valley 
College and this bids fair to increase 
the effectiveness of every department 
of the institution- The "College 
News" is responsible for a large part 
of the interest that is beginning to be 
manifested, increase its efficiency and 
you enhance the welfare of the college. 

Every week renewals and kindly 
criticism come to help us on toward 
our goal. Keep your subscription in 
advance but don't stop there, speak 
about your school to every alumnus 
you meet. Help them to keep their 
interest in their ALMA MATER at 
high water mark MAKE HER 
INTEREST, YOUR INTEREST. A 
recent letter fiom a loyal son stated 
that he was using every effort to in- 
duce several boys in his high school to 
come to Lebanon Valley because he 
felt that any young man of worth 
could be safely entrusted to her care. 
Such loyalty counts may we have more 
of it. 

Another alumnus who has been 
teaching a number of years in New 
Jersey says that he has found that 
Lebanon Valley men can always hold 
their own against, graduates from other 
schools, and that in the future he will 
look to Lebanon Valley for candidates 
for any vacancies in which he may 
chance to be interested. 

Y. M. C. A. 

A fairly good crowd of fellows 
turned out to Y. M. C. A. on Sunday 
afternoon, and a very interesting meet- 
ing was held. The leader, Roger B. 
Saylor, read the Scripture from the 
seventeenth chapter of Luke. The 



subject of the meeting was "If." 
The leader said in part; "If we choose 
certain courses, they will break down 
cur characters, while others will cry- 
stallize into strong and beautiful 
characters. There are two main 
classes of "ifs," the Destructive and 
Constructive. In the realization of 
self, the character is made prominent. 
It is never too late to confess our 
sins to God, if we only take the op- 
portunity to do it. The "ifs" in our 
lives are great factors for good or evil 
bo:h in and out cf college." 

Prof. Lehman was present and made 
a pleasing address. 

Messrs. Brunner and Leibold also 
made appropriate remarks. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting- on Sunday afternoon 
was led by Miss Sara Zimmerman. 
She took as her subject, "Making the 
Best of It," or "The Temptation to 
be Melancholy." Her remarks were 
based on Margaret E. Sangster's little 
poem "Making the Best of It." The 
subject was one of worldwide interest, 
because it touches upon every day life. 
The leader divided melancholy into two 
classes, first, that which is internal, 
arising from no fault of ours, and 
second that which is external, resulting 
from dissatisfaction with the world 
and with ourselves. 

The remedies for melancholy were 
suggested by several of those present, 
especially the exertion of will-power, 
and when human power fails, the help 
of God. The meeting proved very in- 
teresting and helped each one to strive 
to "make the^best of it." 



Clios Entertain 

The Clionian Literary Society enter- 
tained the Ex. Clios of Annville and 
the neighboring vicinity on Friday 
evening. An excellent program was 
rendered after which the Ex. Cilos 
were given a chance to talk. They 
drew many interesting comparisons 
between the society as it now is and 
its condition of former times, which 
showed clearly the marked progress 
Cilo has made since its organization in 
1871. 

After the program the Cilos, ten- 
dered the Ex. members a reception in 
the Ladies' Parlors. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



KALOZETEAN 
Piano Solo, Josiah Reed; Essay, C. 
H. White; Autobiography, Chester E. 
Rettew; 'ALMA MATER,' Society; 
Oration, Phares M. Holdeman ; Debate, 
Resolved: That, the socialistic form 
of government would be better than 
our present system. Affirmative, 
Francis R. Kennedy and James Miller; 
Negative, William Otterbien Ellis and 
Charles Y. Ulrich; Octtetle, Shearer, 
Long, Hayes, Gibble, Charlton, Young, 
Reed and Frost ; « OUR PRESIDENTS, ' 
A. S. Beckley; Exaimner, by Editor 
Dunlap, 

CLIONIAN 

Piano Duette, Evelyn Weidman, 
Naomi; Ely Autobiography, Mary A. 
Spavd;Dr. Ella Flagg Young, Su- 
perintendent of Chicago Schools, Nalle 
Seltzer; Reading, Grace Smith; Piano 
Solo, Susie Schell ; Debate, Resolved : 
That Monday would be a better holiday 
for College Students than Saturday. 
Affirmative, Sara Zimmerman, Vera 
Myers. Negative, Esther Schell, 
Blanch Risser; Olive Branch, Editor. 
PHILOKOSMIAN 

Resume, Robert Hartz; Debate: 
Resolved, That the Church is doing 
more good than the Y. M. and Y. W. 
C. A , Affirmative Amos Weigle, P. F. 
Roberts, Negative, Samuel Grimm, 
G. A. Richie; Vocal Solo, Lester L. 
Spessard ; Original Story Contest, John 
Shirk, Henry Kreider. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Continued from page 1 



Washington's Birthday Party 

Professors Dodge and Sleichter en- 
tertained the dormitory and town 
girls at a Washington's Birthday Party, 
February 22, in the Ladies' Parlors 
The idea of a childrens party was 
carried out both in costume as well as 
in the nature of the amusements. The 
guests were first led into the dining 
hall where a complex cobweb had to 
be unravelled. The labor of each girl 
was rewarded with a promising for- 
tune. 

At a reasonable hour, elegant re- 
freshments were served. 

The guests of honor were: Mrs. 
Keister, Mrs. Lehman, Mrs. Shenk, 
Mrs. Derrickson, Mrs. Shroyer, Mrs. 
Sheldon, Mrs. Vallersham, Misses 
Brown and Lehman. 



Hopkins University medical school, 
are home because of the epidemic of 
diphtheria there. Mr. Shaeffer was a 
college visitor on Monday afternoon. 

The pastor Rev. F. T. Barber, of 
Sugar Grove Seminary writes, one of 
your former students, Mr. Fred Smith, 
'10, conservatory is with us and am glad 
to say is making good and giving 
splendid satisfaction. 

Rev. F. Berry Plummer, '05, of 
Shippensburg, spent several days here, 
as the guest of his brother, Samuel B. 
Plummer, '12. 

Max F. Lehman, '07, after spending 
several days at home left last week to 
resume his studies at the University 
of Pennyslvahia. 

Alfred Mills, '04, is visiting friends 
and relatives in the western part of 
the state. 

Rev. S. F. Daugherty, '01, of 
Westerville, Ohio college pastor of 
Otterbein, recently entered his scrip- 
tion to the "College News" and sent 
his best wishes for the success of the 
paper. 

Mr. Elmer E. Cramer, '83, Grand 
Master, I. O. O. F. of Pennsylvania, 
attended the banquet of the sixty-sixth 
anniversary of the Lebanon Lodge on 
Friday evening, and attended the Ann- 
ville Lodge on Saturday evening. 



Sleighing Parky 

On Tuesday evening of last week a 
party composed of several members of 
the faculty and students enjoyed a 
pleasant sleigh ride to Schafferstown 
and return. On their arrival at the 
latter place they were partakers of a 
sumptuous dinner at the town hotel. 
Some who had the good-fortune to be 
there boast about the excellent chicken 
and waffels served. The roads were 
in splendid condition and every one 
had a most delightful time. 

Those in attendance were : 
Misses Florence Boehm, Ella Bright- 
bill, Grace Smith, Gertrude Cooke, 
Verda Snyder, Ruth Davis, ; Messrs. 
Prof. W anner, Edward Marshall, 
Harry Charlton, Fred Frost and Paul 
Strickler. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

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American, $2.50 per day and up 




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reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



An Exceptionally Good Business 
Opportunity for a College Man 

A well established and good paying Publishing 
Business requiring only a modest c.ipital can be 
secured on favorable terms. An unusually good 
opening. Address: R C. BARNES, 14 N. 
1 3th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



0. G. 



& 



The 



Spalding 

TRADE MARK 




Is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Are the largest 
manufacturers in 
^he world of 

Official 
Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

are in 
teres t - 
e d in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have acopy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia o f What's 
New in Sport and 
is sent free or. 
request. 



IF YOU 



A. Q. Spalding & Bro. 
1120 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year,s guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

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THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

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Dayton, Ohio 



COLLEGE NEWS 




Items of Interest 



F. S. Hensel, '12, who visited his 
parents at Lykens several days last 
week, has returned to school. 

0. T. Ehrhart, '11, attended the 
Sunday School convention at Lebanon 
last Wednesday afternoon. 

Miss Dodge spent Saturday in Phila- 
delphia. 

Miss Adams, Oratory Director, who 
was confined to her room last week on 
account of illness, is again meeting 
her classes. 

Miss Carrie Light, '12, entertained 
the following girls at her home in 
Jonestown over Sunday: Misses, Lau, 
'12, Weidler, '12, Horn, '13, Yarkers, 
'13, and Kiracofe, ex'12. 

Rev. Harry Kottler and Miss Alra 
Fasnacht, formerly of Annville, were 
united in marriage last week by the 
Rev. Paul E. Holdcraft. Rev. 
Kottler and Rev. Holdcraft were both 
students in the Academy last year. 

W. L. Murray spent Saturday and 
Sunday visiting friends in Lebanon. 

Paul Loser, '13. and Earle Loser, 
'13, spent Saturday afternoon in Jones- 
town on business. 

Rev. Spayd of the local U. B. 
church held a platform meeting on Sun- 
day evening in the interest of college 
activities. Professors Shenk and 
Shroyer and Messrs. Kqontz, '11, and 
Brunner, '11, made brief aldresses. 
A quartette composed of Professors 
Lehman and Spessard and Messrs. 
Botts and L. L. Spessard rendered 
several selections. 

J. Ravmond Hemminger of Carlisle 
Pa., a member of the Chapman Alex- 
ander Party in their tour of Australia 
was present at chapel exercises Tues- 
day morning. He made some very 
help'ul remarks on bible reading and 
urged every one to join the Testament 
League which has for its motto "Carry 
a testament every where you go and 
read at least one chapter daily." 

Rev. Mark Wert, pastor of the U. 
B. Church at Intercourse Pa., visited 
among his college friends on Monday. 
Rev. Wert reports nine conversions 
and ten accessions thus far during 
this conference year. 



jCebanon Ualley 
College 



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Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
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COIiliE^SL NEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume II. flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, Matfeh 7, 1911 fJo. 22 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of Marcli 3, 1879. 



Scholarship for L. V. Grads 

The recent Seminary Bulletin brings 
the information of a recent scholar- 
ship which will be interesting to 
Lebanon Valley people. It is known 
as the Charles B. Rettew scholarship. 
Speaking of this witli others, the 
Bulletins says : 

"The first is available to graduates 
of Lebanon Valley College who are 
members of the East Pennsylvania 
Conference, and is to be awarded to 
persons of superior schoslarship and 
character, after a period of three 
years, reserved by the donor for a 
special and designated purpose. It is 
worthy of notice that East Pennsyl- 
vania Conference is the first among all 
the conferences of the church to have 
a scholarship available to its own gra- 
duate students in the Seminary, and 
Lebanon Valley College is the first in- 
stitution of leaining to be likewise re- 
presented." 

Miss Brown Preceptress 

Owing to the resignation of Miss 
Schleichter. a vacancy was also occa- 
sioned in the preceptress-ship of the 
ladies' dormitory. 

Miss Brown, the head of the voice 
department has been elected to the res- 
ponsible position. The rules to be 
enforced by Miss Brown are sub- 
stantially the same as those laid down 
by Miss Schleichter, with the addition 
of the demerits system. Miss Brown 
assumed her duties on Monday. 

Notice. 

K,et every alumnus or friend of the 
College into whose hand this paper 
may come become a subscriber to the 
"News." You owe it to yourself and 
the college you have be friended. 
Subscribe for the "News" and keep 
in touch with your college and its 
•work. 



Faculty Resignation 

It is with much regret that we 
announce the resignation of Miss 
Sleichter as head of the German De- 
partment of the College. This came 
as a great surprise to the student body. 
The resignation due largely to local 
difficulties, took effect on Wednesday 
morning of last week. In the opinion 
of some perhaps, this was a hasty deci- 
sion, and we regret most sincerely that 
the differences could not be properly 
adjusted, and thus avert a vacancy on 
the college facultv. 

Oratory R.ecit*al 

Don't forget the recital to be given 
in the chapel on Thursday evening by 
Miss Adams. This will Joe her first 
appearance before an Ar.nville au- 
dience, and a full house is desired. 
The recital is being held in the in- 
terests of the Oionian Literary society, 
and they are saving no pains to make 
it a success. Come and help to make 
the occasion pleasant and successful. 
Admission, 25 cents, Reserved seats, 
ten cents extra. 

Biological Field Club 

PROGRAM FOR MARCH 8 
™ 1. The Economic value'of the Bob 
White, Samuel Ziegler. 

2. Observations Concerning the 
growth of Stems, W. Albert Brunner. 

S. Medicinal Plants in this Vicinity, 
J. E. Marshall. 

4. Report on Smuts and Rusts, 
Clair Harnish. 

5. Histological Structure of the 
Grasshopper, E. A. Spessard. 

6. Discussion, Early Spring Obser- 
vations. 

Mr. Charles Clipping er and wife 
spent a short time at the college with 
his sister recently. Mr. Clippinger 
was once a Student in Lebanon Valley. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday evening 6 o'clock— College 
Prayer meeting. 

Wednesday evening 7 o'clock- 
Biological Field Club. 

Thursday evening 8 o'clok— Oratory 
and Musical Recital by Miss Adams 
assisted by Miss Gingrich and Mr. E. 
A. Spessard. 

Friday evening 7:15 p. m.— Socie- 
ties. 

Sunday, 1 p. m.— Christian Asso- 
ciations, 




Rev. S. E. Rupp, '01, of Lebanon, 
visited in Dayton during the past week 
and preached in the Summit St. U. B. 
church on Sunday February 26, of 
which Rev. A. R. Clippinger, '08, is 
the pastor. 

Mr. Morris Metzgar, '07 was ad- 
mitted to the Bar of Dauphin county, 
Penna., the court of Judge Kunkle, 
Harrisburg on Monday, February 27, 

George M. Richter, '09, of Bone- 
brake Seminary visited friends here on 
Thursday. 

Elmer L. Haak, '92, of Myerstown, 
attended the chapel services at college 
on Tuesday. 

F. Allen Rutherford, '10, a student 
of Johns Hopkins Univeristy visited 
friends at the college on Friday. 

Dr. M. W. Brunner, '01, of Lebanon 
was the guest of his nephew, W. 
Albert Brunner on Thursday. 

We regret much to learn of the 
death of Mrs. Baish, mother of Prof. 
H. H. Baish, '01, Superintendent of 
the Altoona schools. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 
ASSO( ! [ AT E E DITORS 
\V. A. BRUNNER, '1L 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. K. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER. '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
AY. A. BRUNNER, '11, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 ets. 
CI nbs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Numerous clubs and leagues have 
sprung up mush-roorn-like during the 
past two years at Lebanon Valley. 
But the most recent is the Pocket 
Testament League. This league is a 
band of persons who pledge to carry a 
pocket Testament wherever they go 
and to read an entire chapter in it 
daily. The advent of this league, 
though not new at some places, marks 
a new religious band at Lebaron 
-Valley. The movement needs and de- 
serves the highest anpprobation and it 
is to be hoped that there will not be 
a student at Lebanon Valley that will 
not be carrying and reading his or her 
Testament. 

The Mohammedan delights more in 
nothing than to be able to cite appli- 
cably suitable portions of the Koran. 
We college students and professors as 
■well know how convenient and self 
satisfying too it is if we are able to 
quote verbatim some literary study we 
have made. But in this age of study 
and cramming time is so much crowded 
that we scarcely find an opportunity to 
so thoroughly master a piece of litera- 
ture that we are able to quote much of 
it. In this same rush and flurry, most 
students forget or neglect to notice 
that the Bible is the foundation 
for most of our works of art, yet 
it is one of the convenient things to 



s lide over and as a result it usually 
IS neglected. 

Some folks dislike pledges, Don't be 
so timid ! Don't falslely mock your- 
selves! There isn't a day passes that 
you don't offer to bet some fellow five 
dollars that you know more about a 
certain question than he does. Now 
is your chance to make good your many 
offers at game. Join the Pocket Testa- 
ment League, then be a man and stick 
to it. It costs no stake so you have 
all the capital necessary. 

There never was a time when real 
worthy men were so demanded as they 
are now, so professional men every- 
where tell us. This generation of 
fathers is beginnng to see this fact 
and consequently cur colleges and 
Universities are being filled and at the 
same time being so arranged as to suit 
the needs of all classes. Education 
has become so popular that the youth 
are beginning to feel paupers, unless 
they have an A. B. or its equivs lent 
strung on to their names. 

But is this degree-getting actually 
making men? Is the percentage of 
college graduates commensurate with 
the total number of students who have 
made the attempt at education? Then 
again is the quality of the graduated 
men and women what it should be? 

These three questions are asked 
wherever we go. As college students, 
are they worth our consideration and 
answer? They certainly are. No 
alumnus of any school however poor 
the standard may have been, is 
ashamed that he has at least received 
that much education. If that is true, 
why not hand at least that much to 
some other fellow. If you do that 
much, if you awaken in some young 
mind the desire to know more that 
mind WILL know more and who can 
tell the value of his knowing? 

But when he nas once learned to 
desire for something better new diffi- 
culties arise. We see him then pro- 
bably a preparatory student or a Fresh- 
man. Someone must now awaken 
other desires within him. Here is the 
opportunity of the upper classmen. 
Whether we will or not, every step 
we take is measured sometime by an 
underclassman. Our influence can be 
made for weal or woe in those younger 
lives. With all our attempts at 



"bleaching," it seems too often to 
be true that we sorely neglect to help 
give the underclassman worthy sub- 
jects to think and ponder upon. He 
gets in trouble often ar.d with no ex- 
perience, no friends to help him out. 
He takes his own course. He goes 
from bad to worse. His lessons are 
neglected, and we see the natural con- 
sequent, he is thrown out and goes 
home stigmatized as a young college 
reprobate unfit for decent company. 
We have a duty to perform in keeping 
all such fellows at their work and 
giving them a helping hand whenever 
th^y need it. Even though they may 
themselves never make great use of 
their education, the inheritance of 
their children's children will at least 
have a possible intellectual advantage 
that they themselves did not have. 

Lastly comes the quality question 
of men and women who have actually 
been graduated. I have kn^wn persons 
to consume ten valuable years of ' 'post- 
graduate work" trying to find out how 
they might possibly inculcate their own 
lives into the living mass of humanity 
they termed "our home folks." That 
problem could have been settled right 
at college if those afflicted persons 
would have had two grains of common 
sense. Too many college students 
expect to wait until after commence- 
ment day to begin to live. A sadder 
mistake was never made. Student, 
you are living now just as truly as 
ever you will live, unless it is that 
you will perhaps have to stoop a little 
lower and a little more often after 
you graduate, "if ycu would miss 
many a hard bump." Train yourself 
to "fit in" anywhere at all ano then 
you'll be worth something. 

The time is approaching when some 
of us will "go out " With that going 
out, others will come in and many stay. 
Let us remember to help show some 
cne the values of an education, then to 
see to it that he don't "flunk out," 
and finally to "fit him out" to "fit 
in" some place when he is needed. 



Sunday, March 12, will be Lebanon 
Valley College Day in the U. B. 
churches of Harrisburg and vicinity. 
The Harrisburg U. B. Ministerium nas 
arranged for the occasion by an inter- 
change of ministers to the various 
churches in Harrisburg and vicinity. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Piano Duett, Edith Lehman, 
Florence Christeson; Reading. Ethel 
Dougherty ; That Reminds Me, Sara 
Zimmerman, Carrie Light; Vocal Solo, 
Lottie Spessard; Sketch, Ruth V. 
Engle, Laverne Engle; Our Present 
Day Poets, Edna Kilmer; Piano Solo, 
Ruth Detweiler. 

KALOZETEAN 
Current Events, Boaz G. Light; 
Vocal Duett, Frost, Shearer; Readirg, 
Paul Strickler; Essay, Allen Walter; 
Quartette, Shearer, Long, Gibble and 
Hayes ; Debate : Resolved, That our 
social organization which creats hun- 
dreds of millionares is radically wrong, 
Affirmative, Henry E. Snavely, Victor 
Heffelfinger ; Negative, Arthur Light, 
Karl Schmidt, Oration, William 
Stager; Song of the "A B" by Society; 
Book Review, Edgar Landis. 

PHILCKOSMIAN 
Resume, Artus 0. Kauffman; 
Governmental Extravagence, Leonard 
Roddick ; Debate : Resolved, That the 
United States should fortify rather than 
neutralize the Panama Canal. Affirma- 
tive Earl Loser, J. K. Lehman, 
Negative V. u. Mulhollen, R. B. 
Saylor; Piano Solo, W. W. McCon- 
well ; Does the College Rob the Cradle? 
Sedic Rine; Should Giils Make up their 
Quarrels with Men ? Forrest S. Hensel ; 
Living Thoughts, Editor. 



Conservatory Notes 

Mr. J. H. Johnson entertained a 
few of the girls very nicely by playing 
a few of his own compositions for 
them after chapel services en Tuesday 
morning. 

Miss Brown spent the week end in 
New York City. 

Mr. Joe Kreider spent a few days 
in Philadelphia and heard the new 
opera Natoma. 



Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. 

One of the most spirited and in- 
teresting joint sessions of the christian 
associations for the year was held on 
Sunday afternoon. A special feature 
of this meeting was the first appea- 
rance of a mixed quartette on the pro- 
gram. Misa Gingrich also rendered 
a beautiful solo which was well re- 
ceived. 



The leader for the meeting was Miss 
Zimmerman and the subject discussed 
was Service and Devotion. Mr. 
Ritchey and Mr. Kauffman gave some 
interesting remarks on the various 
phases of Service and Devotion. 

Mr. Ritchey 's remarks were based 
on the fact that as God is the creator 
of all things and as man is his greatest 
creation so it is the duty of man to 
return service to his creator for his 
many blessings. 

Mr. Kauffman in a short address 
showed clearly the different kinds of 
service that man may render to his 
creator. The Devotion that is de- 
manded in order that Christ may be 
glorified. He pointed out at the same 
time the need today for a greater con- 
secration in religious as well as ever 
other kind of work. 

Miss Zimmerman stoke upon the re- 
lation of service and Devotion. She 
showed in her usual clear and concise 
way the meaning of Devotion and Ser- 
vice. The necessity for reciprccal re- 
lation between the Creator and his crea- 
tion. With well chosen quotations 
from Whittier and other poets the 
speaker make her points clear to the 
audience. Her remarks upon the sin- 
gularity of meaning of the two words, 
Devotion and Service, were unique. 
Every factor in the tquation of 
success was present in the rendition 
of the following program. 

Leader, Miss Sara Zimmerman; 
Subject Relative Value of Devotion 
and Service: Value of Devotion in 
Christian Life, Mr. A. 0. Kauffman; 
Solo, Miss Ora Bachman ; Value of 
Service, Mr. G. A. Richie; Quartett, 
Messrs. Rhodes and Botts and Misses 
Spessard and Lehman ; Devotion and 
Service Exemplified in some Biblical 
Character, Miss Esther Schell. 



A recent addition to the Mathema- 
tics room was the installation of elec- 
tric light chandeliers. The credit for 
this goes to the Mathematical Round 
Table, since it was through the efforts 
of that organization that thev were 
procured. 



Prof, and Mrs. Sheldon made a week- 
end trip to fhiladelphia. 



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Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



C O L ^ 



E NEWS 



Items of Interest 



Miss Naomi Ely recently spent several 
days at her home in Hagerstwon. 

Rev. D. E. Long, Field secretary of 
the college, addressed a special meeting 
of the Christian Endeavor Society of 
Salem U. B. church, Lebanon, on Sun- 
day evening. 

P. R. Koontz, '11, visited at the 
home of his parents in West Fairview 
over Sunday. 

Helen Weidler, '12, and Russell 
Weidler, '14, made a week-end visit 
to their home in Royal ton. 

W. L. Murray entertained two of his 
sisters at the college on Saturday. 

Any subsccribers not having received 
their copies of last week's "News" 
can procure them by dropping a card 
to the Business Manager. 

The omission was caused by an 
error in the mailing department. 

Messrs. Botts, Hummel, Rodes and 
Koontz formed a quartette which sang 
at a special service in the U. B. 
church at Hurnmelstown last Thursday 
evening. Dr. J. A. Lyter, of Harris- 
burg, preached the sermon. 

Prof. S. H. Derickson made a busi- 
ness trip to Philadelphia last week. 

J. Maurice Leister read the paper 
at the regular meeting of the college 
ministerium last week. 

Mrs. Violette Freed, matron, visited 
friends in Lebanon last week. 

A. H. Weigel, '13, spent Saturday 
and Sunday at his home. 

Miss Reba F. Lehman, '00, has 
taken up her duties as librarian at 
Hazel ton. 

Secretary Arnold (of the Hazelton 
Y. M. C. A. is on the lookout for a 
fine young [gentleman from Lebanon 
Valley for one of his assistants ; get on 
the job fellows ! 



Beautiful thoughts crystylize into 
habits of grace and kinaness, which 
solidify into genial and sunny circum- 
stances—Selected. 



"lalk happiness. The world is sad 
enough without your woe." — Anon 



jCebanon Ualley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Halt are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

ffiev. jCawrence Jfeister, tPres. 
jfnnviilej ZPa. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

The Journal PublishingCo. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 



DID YOU 
SEE THAT 



Where? At SPESSARD'S. No! 

Well, you better would, for it is selling 
fast. They carry a full line of College 
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and Cuff Links. 

H. E. SPESSARD'S BOOK STORE 

Journal Building ANNVILLE, PA. 

Jinnville national Bank 



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Surplus and Undi- 
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Deposits - - 400,000.00 
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X SCHOOL of \\ 
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Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM«Y« 




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LADIES' and CENTS 
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Students' Discount 



Packard & Radcliffe Slices 



Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward "90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

Full line of College Post Cards, 
^ | Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 

Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement Invitations 
Class Day Programs and 
Class Pins 



Dance Progrms 
and 

Invitations 
Menus 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 

Covers 




Fraternity 
and 

Class Inserts 
for Annuals 
Fraternity 
and Class 
Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 
WORKS— -17th STREET and LEHIGH 
AVENUE Philadelphia. 

Represented at L. V. C. by 
W. ALBERT BRUNNER 

Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully iO.OOO Opera teas on account of 
K-hour law and extensive "wireless" develop- 
ments. We operate under direct supervision on 
Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu-. 
uents, Mhen qualified. Write for catalogue. 

Nat'! Telegraph Institute 

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COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. HnnVille, Pa., Tuesday, JHaPeh 14, 1911 Jio. 23 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Joint 
Session 

The joint associations were privi- 
leged on Sunday afternoon to hear 
Dr. F. C. Thompson of Buffalo, New 
York. Dr. Thompson's subject was 
the "Elements of Success." By the 
use of numerous illustrations the 
speaker kept the attention of his 
hearers focused upon his theme. His 
remarks were in part as follows: 
Everybody wants to "get there' ' in this 
age. The new life demands progress. 
Among the great necessities of success 
is that of concentration. Paul was a 
man that believed in the power of con- 
centration. We should not scatter our 
energies, but aim for big things. In 
this age of specialization, he who 
does one thing well has more chances 
of success than one that scatters his 
energies. 

This same principle should be 
applied along- religious lines. We 
must specialize in order to gain a 
greater appreciation of the gospel. 

In Paul's life his power lay not 
only in his concentrative ability but 
also in always looking forward. He 
forgot the things that were behind 
and pressed on to the things that were 
before. In other words we must have 
ambition: the holy, lofty and worthy 
kind of ambition that leads men to 
consider their fellowmen as brothers, 
not the ambition that led Napoleon to 
triumph over the bodies of his dead 
soldiers. 

In having ambition we must strive, 
for "Woe unto them that are easy in 
Zion." We cannot expect to gain 
success by the use of elevators. 

By the use of many illustrations Dr. 
Thompson showed up clearly the points 
he wished to make, with such vividness 
and force so as to make them doubly 
effective. Although there was a good 
attendance, yet, if many had known 



cf the treat they would miss, there 
would surely have been a greater num- 
ber present. We are always glad to 
have visitors address our associations. 
Our prayers and best wishes are ex- 
tended to Dr. Thompson and msy 
success crown his efforts. 



College Day at Harrisburg 

The United Brethren churches of 
Harrisburg and vicinity * observed 
"College Day" on March 12. By 
these services the college and its op- 
portunities were set forth anew to the 
people and from all accounts, a good 
Interest was manifested. We regret 
that we cannot announce the names of 
all who exchanged pulpits for this occa- 
sion, but we give various changes as 
far as possible : Harrisburg : Otterbein, 
Rev. U. S. G. Renn; First, President 
Lawrence Keister ; Derry Street, Prof. 
H. H. Shenk and Prof. A. E. Shroyer; 
State Street, Rev. R. R. Rodes; Steel- 
ton, Dr. J. A. Lyter; Millersburg, 
Rev. I. E. Kunk ; Hershey, Rev. J. P. 
Koontz; West Fairview, Rev. A. S. 
Lehman; Wormleysburg, Rev. C. A. 
Mutch. 



German Chair Filled 

The recent resignation of the pro- 
fessor of German necessitated the im- 
mediate procuring of a new head of 
that department. We are glad to 
announce that the position has been 
filled in this short time. Miss Lucy 
Seltzer, '10, has taken charge of the 
first three years' German, while Prof. 
Stine, of Annville, is teaching the ad- 
vanced German. Miss Seltzer, a 
member of last year's class is a good 
German student, ably fitted for her 
work, while Prof. Stine, a former 
member of the college faculty, is a 
very proficient German scholar. The 
"NEWS" wishes both success in their 
work. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, March 14, 6 [p.m.— Prayer 
meeting. 

Thursday, March 16, 6 p. m. — 
Ministerial Association; 8 p. m. ; 
Musical recital. 

Friday, March 17, 8 p. m.— St. 
Patrick's Party, Ladies' Parlors. 

Sunday, March 19, 1 p. m.— Christian 
Association 



Monday, March 20, 7:45 p. m.— Star 
Course. 




Miss Lucy Seltzer, '10, of Lebanon, 
spent Saturday in Philadelphia and at- 
tended the performance of ' ' Natoma. ' ' 

Misses Edith Freed, '10, and Edith 
Frantz were the guests of Miss 
LaVerne Keister, Brooklyn, from 
Wednesday to Sunday. Miss Keister 
and Miss Margaret Rigler are students 
at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn. As all 
four were former students they enjoyed 
a "Lebanon Valley Reunion," and at 
the same time enjoyed Maude Adams, 
in "Chantecleer. " 

Mrs. C. E. Geyer, '80, nee Herr, 
of Catawissa, spent several days 
visiting friends and acquaintances in 
Annville recently. 

Star Course 

The next and last number of the 
Star Course entertainments will be 
the entertainment lecture given by 
Sylvester A. Long, in the Engle Hall, 
March 20. It will consist of entertain- 
ment, recreation, instruction and in- 
spiration and not merely funny stories. 
Mr. Long has met with remarkable 
success on the platform in almost every 
state of the Union. It is hoped that 
a large audience will greet Mr. Long- 
next Monday evening. Admission, 35 
cents. Reserved seats, 10 cents extra. 

Chart opens Friday at 12 :30. 



\ 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleuis 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, 'II 

E. A. SPESSAKD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. E. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

There is a cercain feature of L. V. 
life which we wish to emphasize in 
this issue, and that is the attendance 
at public college functions. For some 
time we have been noticing that the 
attendance at public recitals and enter- 
tainments, barring the Star Course, 
has not been up to the standard and 
up to the deserts of the various per- 
formers. Every person who appears 
cn the chapel stage in any entertain- 
ment of whatever nature it may te, has 
gone thru some preparation for the 
event. All public speakers tell us 
that it is easier to speak to a crowded 
house than to an audience, seventy five 
per cent of which is composed of 
empty seats. 

A good exapmle of this lack of in- 
terest, fur such we believe it is, was 
manifested in the recital last Thurs- 
day night. The recital itself was all 
that could be desired, but judging 
from the size of the audience, one could 
hardly believe the above statement to 
be true. This recital was one that 
merited an audience the size of a 
regular Star Course number. But this 
is not the only exapmle we might cite. 

Other entertainments just as meri- 
torious have been held with audiences 
no larger than in the above mentioned 
instance. 

No matter what the organization 
under whose auspices the entertain- 



ment is being held, if it merits the 
permission of the use of the chapel 
from the authorities for the rendition, 
it merits patronage from the entire 
student body and friends of the college 
in tne immediate vicinity at least. If 
you desire to see the organization to 
which you belong patronized, it is ycur 
duty, each and every one, to patronize 
others when they are making an effort 
for their betterment. This is not more 
than fair; it is not more than right. 

We are unable to state a definite 
reason for this condition, ana we regret 
to say that it is true. Surely there is 
a lack of college spirit in this respect 
and it looks almost as tho it borders 
on egoism. There will be another 
public recital in the conservatory this 
week. Why not come out and greet 
the performers with a crowded house? 
Why not ^show them we are interested 
in them and their work as we would 
have them be in ours? "A word to 
the wise is sufficient." 

As'spring draws near, the base ball 
fever begins to rise. The aspirants 
for the various teams begin to get 
in form for the coming season. The 
manager and captain will issue an 
official call for candidates very soon. 
Now, fellows, every one who can 
possibly do so, come out to fhe athletic 
field and work as hard as you can. 
Every fellow has the same chance, for 
the manager says absolutely, the best 
man will get the position. If you do 
not secure a place on the varsitv nine, 
do not stop coming to practice as 
soon as the team i3 chosen. They 
need hard consistent practice every 
day, and a strong scrub team is needed 
to give them that practice. Do your 
best for a successful season. 

There is another way many can 
help, and that is by paying all out- 
standing athletic fees. As any other 
organization needs funds the athletic 
association has plenty of places to use 
money to advantage. Of course this 
does not apply to all, for a fairly good 
number have paid in full. It is to 
those who have not paid that this ap- 
peal is made. The treasurer of the 
athletic association is ready to receive 
all funds, and issue seasons tickets to 
all who pay their fees. Will you not 
surprise him by demanding your tickets 
on account of the paid fee? 



Splendid Oratory Recital 

Any persons who failed to be pre- 
sent at the Oratory Recital on Thursday 
evening missed a rare treat. The 
Clionian Literary society presented 
Miss May Belle Adams, directjr of 
the Oratory Department, in a public 
recital. Each number of the pro- 
gram was very well received by the 
audience. Miss Adams' rendition of 
Scotch dialect, and "The SleepWalking 
Scene" from "Macbeth" were 
especially appreciated. A special 
feature of the recital was an original 
play dramatized from a book by Mrs. 
Laura E. Richards. The portrayal of 
every character was very fine and 
showed Mist Adams' great ability in 
that line of work. Miss Adams was 
assisted by several vocal and instru- 
mental selection?. The program 
follows. 

PART I Piano Duet— Poet and Pea- 
sant, Overture, Suppe, Mae Meyer, 
Ruth Dstweiler; Through the Flood, 
Dan MacLaren ; Selected Poems ; Sleep- 
walking Scene from Macbeth, Shakes- 
peare; Vocal Duet, Selected, Edith 
Gingrich . Earl Spessard. 

PART II Vocal Solo. Selected, Earl 
Spessard; Original Play— Mrs. Tree. 
Dramatized by Miss Adams from book 
by Mrs. Laura E. Richards, Charac- 
ters, Mrs. Tree, Direxia Hawks, maid- 
servant to Mrs. Tree, Miss Vesta 
Blythe, niece to Mrs. Iree, Mrs. Maria 
Darracott Pryor, niece to Mrs. Tree, 
Mrs. Malvina Weight, neighbor to 
Mrs. Tree, Tommy Candy. 



Conservatory Notes 

Prof and Mrs. Sheldon, left on 
Thursday evening for Williamsport, 
where they gave an organ reciial in 
thu St. Lukes Evangelical church on 
Friday evening. 

Miss Maud Kirshner spent last Sun- 
day at her home in Shoemakersville. 

The Junior class of the conservatory 
extends to all a most cordial invitation 
to their recital to be given Thursday 
evening March sixteenth. 

The class has been long looking 
forward to this occasion and to make 
this a success it is the desire of the 
class that the students and friends of 
the college will encourage them by 
their presence on Thursday evening. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Juniors Feed 

Wednesday night was an occasion 
of much feasting and a jolly good time 
among the members of the class of 
1912. It was the first social affair of 
the class in its junior year. While 
it was rather late in the year, that 
did not detract any from the pleasures 
of the occasion. The event wa3 extra- 
ordinary as shown by the unhp of the 
class and the appreciation of the boun- 
teous table and other means of enter- 
tainment provided by the committee in 
charge. The class has had trouble 
ever since its Freshman year in 
reaching any unity of action in social 
features. This their latest attempt 
was a most decided success and the 
participants came not away hungry. 

The banquet was held in the library 
reading room while the reception room 
alone was appropriately decorated for 
the other informal social features. 
Music was constantly to be heard and 
College and class songs were sung. 
College and class enthusiasm as well 
as general good cheer went round. 

At 8 p. m. nineteen of the Juniors 
assembled and an hour was spent in 
sociability. Then all were conducted 
below where a table filled with good 
things awaited them. When all the 
courses were served speeches were in 
order at the call of the master of 
ceremonies Oliver Butterwick. The 
table was left behind at 10:45 and at 
11:15 all departed much pleased with 
the effects of the good time together. 

The committee of arrangements con- 
sisted [of Oliver Butterwick, Clair 
Harnish and Miss Carrie Light. 

Those present were Misses Hershey, 
Kilmer, Lau, Light, Seltzer, Weidler, 
Messrs. Beckley, Butterwick, Grimm, 
Harnish, Keister, Leibold, Plummer, 
Reed, Ressler, Rettew, Shively, 
Smith, Thomas and Wingerd. 



Biological Field Club 

The recent meeting of the Biological 
Field club was extremely interesting. 
Samuel Zeigler presented a very well 
prepared paper on "The Economic 
Value of the Bob White." J. E. 
Marshall read an extensive paper on 
"Medicinal Plants found in this 
Vicinity." In the paper these plants 
were located and some distinguishing 
marks given. Clair Harnish carefully 



discussed the "Native Rusts and 
Smuts." He presented some amazing 
figures which represent the loss each 
year from thesepests. "Histological 
structure of a grasshopper" was dis- 
cussed in detail by E. A. Spessard. 
In this connection many parts were 
shown from prepared slides by the 
means of the lantern. 

During the general discussion Prof. 
Derickson demonstrated by the use of 
some moss slides the great interest 
the lantern may add to the work of 
the club. The attendance was good 
and much interest shown throughout. 
At the next meeting the club will 
celebrate its Anniversary by present- 
ing Dr. Johnson of Johns Hopkins 
University in a lecture. Further an- 
nouncement will be given later. 



St. Patrick's Party 

The annual St. Patrick's Party will 
be held on Friday evening, March 17, 
in the Ladies' Parlors. The Clionian 
Literary society extends a hearty in- 
vitation to all students and friends of 
the college to attend. This is an 
annual event, held on a par with the 
Hallowe'en Party given by the Philo- 
kosmians, and the Masquerade given 
on St. Valentine's Day by the Kaloze- 
teans. Everybody looks forward to 
these events with no small anticipa- 
tion. The Clios hope a large number 
will be present to enjoy the "sevtn- 
tenth of Ireland" with them. 




Items of Interest 




Miss Clara K. Horn, '13, spent the 
week-end at her home in Enola. 

Rev. A. E. Williams, pastor of the 
local Evangelical Association church, 
conducted chapel on Friday morning. 

C. C. Smith, '12, and Guy Win- 
gerd, '12, made a business trip to 
Harrisburg on Saturday afternoon. 

Lizzie Lau, '12, spent several days 
at her home in "York last week. 

Verda Snyder, '11, Oratory, was 
the guest of Lizzie Lau, '12, and Edna 
Yeatts, '09, at York over Sunday. 

Harry Charlton, '14, was the guest 
of John Lyter, '14, at Harrisburg over 
Sunday. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



Evelyn Weidman and Naomi Ely 
were Harrisburg visitors on Saturday. 

Ralph Riegel and William Deck, 
former students of the Academy, 
circulated among friends here on Sun- 
day. 

Mrs. J. P. Myers and Mrs. E. IT. 
RafTensperger of Centerville were the 
gue3ts of Miss Vera Myers on Thurs- 
day and Friaay. 

Rev. W. H. Weaver, of Lemoyne, 
was a business visitor at the college 
on Tuesday. 

Pres. Keister, Prof. A. E. Schroyer, 
John Lyter, Ivan Refsler, Harry Charl- 
ton, Harry Ulrich, Miss Parks, Nellie 
Seltzer, Carrie Light and Catharine 
Hershey heard the address on Women's 
suffrage given by Judge Ben Lindsey 
in the House of Representatives, 
Harrisburg, on Monday afternoon. 

H. S. Warner, of Chicago, national 
official of the Intercollegiate Prohibi- 
tion Association was here Monday 
looking after the interest of the local 
league previous to the state contest 
which is to beheld here the latter part 
of April. At present the local league 
is busy preparing for the contest in 
which a number of the representative 
colleges of the state will have a 
speaker. This promises to be one of 
the most interesting intercollegiate 
affairs held at the school this year. 



Fruition 

BY KATHARINE TYNAN 
The year's at flowering time, Tj 
Beauty's full— at her prime, 
The night is ours and Love's. 

All passes ! 
There's a voice in the myrtle groves. 

Love, love me forever ! 

The leaves tremble and shiver. 

Spring's heavy with sweet. 

All passes! 
There's a stirring of hidJen feet. 

Love, did you speak or say 
Aught? The wind is at play. 
The nightingale is still. 

All passes ! 
The dews: are the dews so chill? 

Why is Your check so white, 
White Love, on our wedding night? 
See— joy long waited for! 

All passes! 
The wind sighed: nothing more. 

--MC CLURE'S. 



jCebanon QSalley 
College 



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826 Cumberland Street 
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DID YOU 
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COkhEGE jTlTjiiS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Ma^eh 21, 1911 fio. 24 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Athletic Mass Meeting 

A mass meeting of all the students 
and friends of the college has been 
arranged by the members of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the Athletic 
Association. This meeting will be 
held in the college chapel on Thursday 
evening March the twentyfourth. The 
purpose of the meeting is to arouse a 
keener interest in all phases of college 
athletics and primarily to discuss cer- 
tain phases of the approaching baseball 
season. Prominent men from the 
town who are interested in the sport 
have been invited to attend. It is hoped 
„ that mutual cooperation between the 
town and the college may be establish- 
ed. The Execcutive Committee of the 
Alumni Association will be present 
and lend their support to our counsels. 
Let every body be present and help to 
arouse a clean healthy athletic spirit 
at Lebanon Valley, a spirit that will 
mean VICTORY. 



Junior Music Recital 

A good sized audience greeted the 
Junior Music class at their recital in 
the Conserrvatory last Thursday 
evening. Each member of the class 
showed very pleasingly the results of 
their efforts in the conservatory this 
year. Rounds of applause greeted 
each performer and the two-piano num- 
bers were especially popular. The 
chapel was tastefully decorated with 
potted plants and the class colors, 
lavendar and white. Several vocal 
numbers and readings added much to 
the program. 

The members of the class are : Miss 
Meda May Diehm. Penryn; Miss Ruth 
Elizabeth Engle, Palmyra; Miss Anna 
Alma Fry, Sec'y Palmyra ; Miss Kathe- 
rine May Gingrich, Pres., Palmrya; 
Miss Mary Alice Spayd, Annville; 
Miss Bertha Susan Spessard, V. pres., 
Annville; Miss Sara Catherine 
Strickler, Treas , Lebanon. 



Athletic Social 

Several weeks ago the Executive 
Committee of the Athletic Association 
decided to raise money for Athletic 
Scholarships for 1911-12 and for this 
purpose a committee consisting of 
Saylor, Lehman, Ressler, Hensel and 
Lyter were appointed. The committee 
has arranged to give an Athletic social 
next Saturday evening in the Assembly 
room of the Library. c?oats are to 
arrive any time after 7:30 p. m. and 
the passengers will then be inspected 
by the Custom House Officers who will 
determine the duty each one must pay 
according to the United States Custom 
Laws. An interesting program has 
been arranged and also several other 
attractions which will not be made 
known until Saturday evening. 

In connection with the social a 
Popularity Contest is being conducted 
and voting can be done any time 
until 9 p. m. Saturday. A valuable 
Prize will be given to the winner. 
The votes are cheap. Be a repeater. 
Vote often and see your favorite win. 
Woman Suffrage is desired in this 
contest. Refreshments will be served 
free of charge. It's something new 
and for a good cause. Come and have 
a good time. 



Ministerial Association 

The Ministerial Association of the 
College was pleasantly entertained at 
their last regular meeting, at the home 
of J. W. Bomberger on Sheridan 
Avenue on Thursday evening. D. E. 
Young was elected secretary to fill the 
unexpired term of W. L. Murray, who 
resigned and left school. The paper 
was read by C. E. Rettew, and an in- 
teresting discussion followed. 



Miss Mary Gruber, of Campbelltown 
and a student at Miilersville State 
Normal School was in attendance at 
the Clio. St. Patricks party 



Calendar. 

luesday, March 21, 6 p. m. —Prayer 
Meeting, 8 p. m., Prohibition Lec- 
ture. 

Wednesday, March 22, 8 p. m.— 
Freshman — Sophomore Basketball 
Game, P. 0. S. of A. Hall, Lebanon. 

Thursday, March 23, 8 p. m.— Ath- 
letic Mass Meeting, College Chapel. 

Friday, March 24, 7:15 p m.— 
Literary Societies. 

Saturday, March 25, 7:30 p. m.— Ath- 
letic Social, Assembly room, Library. 

Sunday, March 26, 1 p. m.— Chris- 
tian Associations. 




Bert Oldham, who has been in busi- 
ness in Easton, Pa for two years, and 
who was formerly an Instructor of piano 
in the conservatory here, left recently 
for South Dakota where he will take 
up a claim near that one, his parents 
are living on. 

Miss Mary Keller, '97, of Phila- 
delphia, visited friends here on Mon- 
day. 

Revs. Joseph Daugherty, '90, Myers- 
town, E. O. Burtner, '91, and H. P. 
Rhoad, '03, Highspire, met at the* 
college on Friday to arrange for the 
work connected with the second year's 
conference reading course. 

Amos B. Moyer, '09, is principal of 
the schools of Danville, Pa, 

J. H. Sprecher, '07, principal of 
the Honey Brook Borough High 
School, has renewed his subscription 
to the News. 

Louise Kreider, '08, conservalory, 
a student at Wells College. Aurora, N. 
Y. arrived here on Tuesday, to spend 
her vacation at the home of her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. Gideon R. Kreider. 

Aaron Herr, '79, moved last week 
to Calgary Canada. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
P. R. KOONTZ, '11 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER. '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, 'l.'J 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 c(s. 
CI ubs of ten , /J ets. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

The mass meeting on Thursday will 
be a success if the students make it 
so. Let every one be present. Show 
your spirit. 

The athletic circles of all our col lege3 
are now in the height of baseball 
expectations. Foot ball and basketball 
each have their turn. The manner in 
which these sports are conducted re- 
quires much money, time and even the 
risk of a few bruises, Some people 
•who know nothing of the condition of 
■college life and even some students, 
teachers and other authorities of our 
colleges denounce them in vigorous 
terms. Opposition takes various 
forms. Some denounce them because 
they inink athletics, and especially 
football, brutal, others object to the 
expense and still others say that under 
the present system onlj a few favored 
men who make the team reap any bene- 
fits from ath'etics while all are forced 
to spend their means for thnir support. 

All of these arguments are about as 
valid as the argument of the back 
woods farmer who claims that college 
boys should be compelled to chop wood 
for pastime and exercise. He has 
never investigated conditions, nor have 
most of tne critics who are found in 
the institutions themselves. 

Athletics may become an evil in 



many ways, but if they are carefullv 
supervised by the school authorities, 
and directed by a competent coach 
there is no institution in our modern 
educational system that will or can do 
more for the all around development of 
American youth than athletic sports. 

If these sports fail at any school to 
get the proper results it is not the 
fault of the sports in question but in 
the management of the institution 
itself. No college can control these 
activities without giving some time 
and money toward their supporrt. 
Teams run on an entirely indepen- 
dent basis are sure to fail in their 
efficiency as an agent for development 
in student life. If a college would 
reap the vast benefits that may come 
from properly conducted sports, it is 
under a morai necessity to assume 
some of the responsibility connected 
therewith. 

Some well meaning men denounce 
athletics because they claim they lead 
to rowdyism, evil associations and a 
general lowering of ideals. This is 
not the fault of the sport, but the fault 
of those who should direct them. 

Mercer a man whose past and present 
life has brought him in touch with all 
the phases of college activities and 
who himself has passed thru about all 
the expeiiences possible for a college 
man, from a state of absolute worth- 
lessness to one of great value in the 
formation of life nnd character, 
a man, who in the interest of our 
tempted college boys has visited nearly 
every school of importance in the 
United States, and who has been 
familiar with the life in many of them 
for a long period of yeais, at a recent, 
dinner in San Francisco said that 
during the past decade or so since ath- 
letics have assumed such prominence 
in college life drunkeness ana all 
kindred crimes have decreased more 
than fifty per cent. These conditions, 
he claims bear a close causal relation 
and he supports the claim with valid 
arguments. 

This fact alone' should make every 
man who is interested in college sports 
more devoted to them and those who 
hold aloof shculd make a closer study 
of conditions as they actually exist 
and maybe they would be led to find 
in athletics an ideal method to govern 



the spnotaneous energies and activities 
of American youth. Let us at Lebanon 
Valley make our athletics count for 
mental, moral, and physical develop- 
ment. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The subject for discusison on Sunday 
afternoon was "Power from Above." 
Miss Esther Schell led the meeting and 
carefully reviewed the circumstances 
under which the master gave the com- 
mand to his disciples to tarry before 
beginning their mission, until they 
should be endued with power. She 
emphasized the necessity of heeding 
this command an! pointed out the im- 
portant part it played in rendering the 
disciples' v\ork effective. 

A lively discussion followed the 
leaders remarks in which many ex- 
cellent thoughts were brought out. 
It is necessary that we put ourselves 
into an attitude to receive Gods' spirit 
before we car get power from above. 
We too often attempt to do things in 
our own strength, the uselessness of 
which is clearly illustrated by nume- 
rous examples from the Bible. When- 
ever we cease to listen to the voice of 
the Spirit our acts are not in accor- 
dance with Gods' Will. 

To do effective Christian work we 
must keep in close touch with Christ 
and gain through prayer, the power 
necessary to fulfil his commands. 

Professor and Mrs. Derickson 
Entertain 

Saturday evening, March 18, at 8 p. 
m. Prof, and Mrs. Derickson most 
pleasantly entertained at their home 
the members of the class in Biology lb. 

A must dclightlul entertainment 
was prepared for us by the host and 
hostess and the evening was a 
great treat. There were games 
founded upon Biology and appropriate 
rewards were given to the victors in 
the various contests. We must not for- 
get the excellent refreshments served 
at just the right time. The ccccasion 
did not lack its musical features for 
Prof. Derickson provided us with biolo- 
gical songs which we must needs tost. 

Those present were Misses Yarkers, 
Horn, Clippinger, Christesun, Lehman, 
Lottie Spessard, Burd and Messrs. 
Lehman, Grimm, Becklej, Saylor, 
Heffelfinger. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Program Cilo.— Philo. Joint 
Session 

Duett, Katie Gingrich, Ruth Engle; 
Reading, Verda Snyder; Paper, Edith 
Lehman ; Vocal Solo, Merle Turby ; 
Oration, Oliver Butterwick ; Parody, 
J. K. Lehman; Quartett, Edith Gin- 
grich, Ora Bachman, Paul Koontz, 
Paul Hummel ; Olive Branch and 
Living Thoughts, Editors. 

KALOZETEAN 

Reading, David E. Young; Oration, 
Charles Arndt; Parliamentary drill, 
leade-s, Ivan Ressler and William 0. 
Ellis; Piano Solo, Walter Biever; 
Presidents Valedictory, F. F. Frost; 
President's Inaugural, F. R. Kennedy; 
Kalo song, Society; The value of 
Novel Reading, Josiah Reed. 

Kalozetean Election 

At the business meeting held on 
Friday, March 17, at 12:30, the 
following officers were elected for the 
spring term. President, Francis R. 
Kennedy ; Vice President. Donald C. 
Kei3ter; Critic, A. S. Beckley; Re- 
cording Secretary, George Williams; 
Corresponding Secretary, John Lyter; 
Sergeant-at-arms, Warren Hayes ; 
Assistant Sergeant-al-arms, J. T. 
Miller; Chaplain, C. G. White; Editor 
of Examiner, Victor Heffelfinger, 
Pianist, Josiah Reed. 

Mathematical Round Table 

Mathematical Roundtable will meet 
March 29 in Prof. Lehman's recitation 
room at which time the following 
program will be rendered. 

Modern Mathematical methods, 
Leray B. Harnish; Original Story 
L. L. Spessard; Nine Point Circle, 
Oliver Butterwick. Visitors are wel- 
come. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Guy Wingerd led the meeting on 
Sunday afternoon. The subject of his 
discussion was the value of self res- 
pect. He defined and set forth in a 
pleasing manner his meaning of self 
respect. G. A. Richie gave a very 
interesting report on the industrial 
work of the Y. M. C. A. as observed 
a I: the recent convention at West 
Chester, Pa. The method the Y. M. 
C. A. worker uses to win these men 
lor Christ follows in brief. The in- 
dustrial workers may be interested in 
music or in educational lines. The 



Y. M. C. A. provides lectures on al- 
most every topic. The evils of drink 
are portrayed, the dangers of tubercu- 
losis and contagious diseases discussed. 

Educational advantages are offered 
to members, by which foreigners may 
learn English, civics or any line or 
work. The part that leading men 
of big corporations are taking in Y. 
M. C. A. work was indicated. There 
is a need for brains to help this move- 
ment along. This work is a challenge 
to all college men to serve and in this 
way reach the workers in our indus- 
trial Fields for CI rist. 

S. 0. Grimm gave a general survey 
of the convention and especially school 
and college phases of the Y. M. C. A. 
work. His report was in brief as 
follows: The importance of college 
men was advanced. Statistics prove 
that sixty-five per cent of all the im- 
portant men to-day are college men. 
A college man has one chance out of 
one hundred and twenty six to become 
famous, while the man in everyday 
life has only one chance in eight thou- 
sand four hundred and twenty four. 

College graduates furnish one third 
of all the proimnent men. Therefore 
much is expected from the college man. 
If he fails, then his failure does more 
harm than the failure of an ordinary 
man. In schools and colleges, the Y. 
M. C. A. should stand for these essen- 
tials. First, true animals; second, 
sanctified brains ; third, true friendship 
and faith. 

In the Christian life there is no 
such thing as graduation. Christianity 
means not only to keep one's self un- 
spotted from the world ; but to visit 
the widows and the fatherless in their 
affliction. Important local features of 
the conventionwere that our Association 
had the second highest number of 
delegates and that Mr. Earle Spessard 
led the singing. 



St. Patrick's Party 

The Clionian Literary Society ten- 
dered a brilliant party to the other 
Societies and friends on the evening 
of St. Patrick's Day. It is needless 
to say that it was a grand success. 

The reception hall and parlors of 
the ladies' dormitory were beautifully 
decorated in green and upon the walls 
were appropriate quotations of Irish 
hue. 



Among the amusements was a chart 
for subscribing guesses as to how many 
snakes were chased out of Ireland. 
Irish clover leaves with letters upon 
them were passed around. The letters 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



formed the words Bedelia and Patrick. 
Groups of these letters were formed 
each of which wrote an eight line 
poem each line beginning with the 
letter of the group. The winnng 
groups of each word each told an Irish 
joke, and the winners of this contest 
received a clevor reward. 

The gentlemen received their 
partners for refreshments by guessing 
the names of the ladies from their 
shadows thrown [upon a white curtain. 
Some suie guesses were made. 

After this refreshments'were served. 
The first course consisted of salad 
served upon lettuce leaves, with wafers 
anJ pickles. This was followed by a 
deliciously flavored green colored ice 
cream. 

A social hour was spent and the 
party broke up amid hearty cheers and 
laughter. 



Items of Interest 



Chester E. Rettew preached at 
Pleasant Hill on Sunday evening. 

Francis R. Kennedy, '11, led Chris- 
tian Endeavor society at the U. B. 
Church. The topic was "Money and 
its uses" and the leader made a few 
quite appropriate remarks. 

Miss Pauline Burd, of Shireinans- 
town was a guest of Miss Lottie 
Spessard over Sunday. 

Elmer E. Yake, ex '11, and now a 
member of the Junior class at Lehigh 
University has recently been elected 
to the honorary society of Tau Beta Pi 
at his institution. This society has 
scholarship and'general college activi- 
ties for its fundamental principles, 
and any one that receives this decided 
distinction must of necessity be both 
a scholar and a gentleman. 

Prof. A. E. Shroyer filled the pulpit 
for Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, '11, at 
Hebron, on Sunday evening. 

Prof. Parks addressed Rev. Wit- 
man's congregation on Sunday 
morning. Her subject "A girl I 
have known" was interestingly pre- 
sented. Many facts concerning the 
recent shirtwai?t strike in New York 
City were incidentally discussed. 



jCebanon Valley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
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Write for catalogue 

jCawrence Jfeister, iPres. 
jfnnviile, ZPa, 

Have Your Printing Done by 

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When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

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826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
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Well, you better would, for it is selling 
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Students' Discount 



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Standard Steam Laundry and 
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Represented at College 

£\ Full line of College Post Cards, 
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Pro/S II Derickson 110^2 

COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Mar*eh 28, 1911 Jio. 25 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Athletic Mass Meeting 

The mass meeting in the chapel cn 
Thursday evening was well represented 
by a large number of the members of 
student body, faculty, and alumni who 
re=ide in this vicinity. C. F. Harnish, 
'12, president of the athletic associa- 
tion presided. The purpose of 1he 
meeting was to "boost" athletics in 
general, but base ball for the 
coming season in particular. Quite 
a bit of spirit was shown on the 
part of the students from their res- 
ponses in songs and yells. Ihe ad- 
dresses b\ the alumni were interesting 
and spirited, and put new life into 
every one present. A feature of the 
meeting was the announcement by Mr. 
Alfred K. Mills, '04, that alumni and 
friends had contributed sufficient funds 
to equip the base ball team with 
new uniforms. Addresses were made 
by Messrs. A, K. Mills, '04, Fred 
Light '00, J. Walter Esbenshade, '03, 
Dr. M. W. Brunner, '01, Profs. 
Derickson, '02, Shroyer, '00, Shenk, 
Wanner and Miss Dodge. It is hoped 
that more such interesting meetings 
will be held to help to build up College 
athletics and give them the place they 
ought to have in the student's life. 

First Base Ball Game 

The local base ball season will open 
next Saturday when the L. V. team 
will journey to Mercersburg to play 
the Mercersburg Academy nine. Our 
opponents will have a splendid team in 
the field, and a good game can be ex- 
pected. 

It is urged upon every fellow who 
can to come out to practice eveiy night 
this week, so that the strongest 
possible aggregation may be secured to 
battle against the Academy team. 
Our team has not been selected yet, and 
manager Brunner and captain Harnish 
desire good practices every evening 
this week. Let the baseball slogan 
for the week be "On to Mercersburg." 



Star Course 

The fifth and last number of the 
course entertainments presented by our 
Christian Associations was given in 
the college chapel on Monday night 
March 20, to a fair sized audience 
which however was not nearly com- 
mensurate with the splendid entertain- 
ment. The attraction was Sylvester 
A. Long, the humorist lecturer, who 
gave us hi3 delightful lecture 
"Lightning and Toothpicks." A 
glance at his subject at once praises 
the question as to the relation between 
lightning and toothpicks. The lec- 
turer treated the subject in a most uni- 
que manner and illuminated his dis- 
course with many humorous and ap- 
propriate illustrations. Throughout 
there was enough of the humorous to 
hold the attention of every one in the 
audience. It was an entertainment 
splendidly conceived and delivered in 
marvelous English. This the last of 
the course and was up to the standard 
of the preious entertainments. 

The purport of the lecture was to 
show that every thing in life comes 
about in obedience to some inexorable, 
and unchanging law, and to show the 
place of love in the universe. Every- 
one present was very much pleased 
with the entertainment. 




Dr. and Mrs. Gerberich, of Lebanon 
Pa., will start in a few weeks for a 
tour abroad. Mrs. Gerberich was a 
member of the class of '07. The tour 
is planned through the British Isles 
France and Germany and to extend 
over a period of several months, at the 
end of which time Dr. Gerberich will 
take up studies in a German University. 

Miss Myrtle Garrett, '10, visited 
friends at the college on Friday. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, 5 p. m.— College prayer 
meeting. 

Friday, 7:15 p. m. — Societies. 

Sunday afternoon— Christian Asso- 
ciations. 



Special 

The time is rapidly approaching 
when the business management of the 
"News" will change, 'ihe present 
manager has succeeded in defraying 
all expeneses as they fell due but in 
order to continue this policy and in- 
sure the permanence of the publica- 
tion, it is necssary that all arrears be 
advanced and all renewals promptly 
remitted. Look at the label on your 
paper. The date found there denotes 
the time of expiration. If this notice, 
is promptly complied with it will 
greatly help the management. 

All students who have not settled 
with the "News" will please see the 
manager during the next week. Re- 
member there is no time like the pre- 
sent. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The regular session of the Y. M. C. 
A. held on Sunday afternoon, was con- 
ducted by Mr. Russel Weidler. Al- 
though few were present yet the usual 
interest was manifested. Ihe leader 
used as a basis of his remarks the 
second verse of the seventh chapter 
of Matthew. < ' With what measure ye 
mete, it shall be measured to you 
again." He clearly brought out that 
"we gain as we give," and very 
beautifully showed that this was true, 
by some appropriate il lustrations. He 
showed that this was true in animal 
life, plant life and in every phase of 
our own lives. Ritchie, Leibold and 
Rettew also gave short talks on the 
subject. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 
DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
CI iibs of ten, cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

At one crisis of this nation's his- 
tory Poor Richard headed a paper with 
the picture of a segmented snake, with 
the quite terse and pointed injunction 
"Unite or Die. " We wish we had 
that same cut to place at the head of 
the column of this issue of the NEWS. 

Lebanon Valley has passed through 
a long and painful winter of Difficul- 
ties. Students, constituents, authori- 
ties and all have at times become dis- 
couraged. But spring has come! 
The ice is broken, and the "Ship of 
State" rides uneasily at her anchor 
chains impatient to be on a new 
career. Shall we hold her longer? 

We students and some alumni met on 
Thursday evening and had a good old 
spirited meeting. Then it was 
pointed out WHO are the anchor chains. 

There is no getting out of it, if 
this college is to prosper, as it is 
hoped she will, the student bodies as 
they sucessively inherit that honor, 
will to a large extent, check or for- 
ward that prospreity. Now are we 
going to allow all that we heard at 
that mass meeting to soak out just as 
fast as it soaked in. Honestly, now, 
what did you attend that meeHng for 
anyway? Out of respect? Then you 
disgraced yourself and belied your 
honor! Out of a sence of duty ? This 



college has enough "standpatters," 
you had better go bury yourself ! Out 
of a LOVE FOR THE CAUSE? Con- 
gratulations ! If you came not for 
that purpose, then "you are a liar and 
the truth is not in you." It is just 
as bad to act a lie as to tell one. 

But we are not pessimistic we be- 
lieve there were many there who had 
the cause of this college at heart, 
many who are determined that this 
cause shall go forward in spite of all 
difficulties. When that cause is 
finally reached will it not be pathetic 
to see some of those cheap, chicken 
hearted, vascillating character-pigmies 
strutting about the grand old structure 
nurrbling to each other: "I thought so; 
I thought so. " 

Don't become a scape-goat student, 
use what little brains you have to the 
advantage of all noble efforts which 
are being advocated in behalf of this 
institution. If a few persons should 
down athletics don't YOU begin to 
"pout" and winco that you won't 
play "dollie" any longer if they don't 
all play YOUR way. 

The alumni are making efforts to 
coalesce with us in projects of advance- 
ment along all lines Let us not be 
in the lurk when the final moment 
conies for a union. We first must 
unite with each other if we ever hope 
to unite with any other. "If any 
man have ought" against his society 
neighbor let him fix it 110. Don't 
knock, but boost ! 

Now you are many of you crying 
that this is all right in theory, but 
not in practice. We tell you, it IS all 
right in practice! That argument is 
two million years out of date. It has 
been exploded as often as a sevrious 
minded reformer has appeared. If 
you think LESS about its impract- 
icability and MORE about trying it, 
you won't have so many difficulties. 

Don't wait any longer now, but DO 
something, no matter what or how 
little it may be. For this thing is 
GOING and when its all over you will 
be sorry if you never contributed any- 
thing to UNITY BETWEEN ALUMNI 
AND STUDENTS IN BEHALF OF 
THE COLLEGE. 

W. 0. Ellis, '11, and F. R. Kennedy, 
'11, enjoyed a day's outing at Mt. 
Gretna on Sunday. 



Clio-Philo Joint Session 

A very interesting joint session of 
the Clionian and Philokosmian Literary 
Societies was held on Friday evening 
in Philo hall. The program was in- 
teresting from start to finish, both 
literary and musical numbers showing 
marked preparation on the part of 
the performers. About one hundred 
persons were present. Among those 
present who are not members of either 
society were Rev. H. B. Spayd, Prof, 
and Mrs. J. E. Lehman, Miss Dodge, 
Miss Adams, Miss Parks, Miss Brown, 
Miss Spessard, Miss Seltzer, Miss 
Garret, Mr. Barnhart and Mr. Kreider. 

The officers of the Clionian society 
presided over the meeting and the 
following program was rendered: 

Duett, Katie Gingrich Ruth Engle; 
Reading, Verda Snyder; Paper, Edith 
Lehman; Vocal Solo, Merle Turby; 
Oration, Oliver Butterwick ; Parody, 
J. K. Lehman : Quartett, Edith Gin- 
grich, Ora Bachman, Paul Koontz, 
Paul Hummel ; Olive Branch and Living 
Thoughts, Editors. 



Athletic Social 

The campaign for money to be used 
for athletic purposes culminated in an 
athletic social held Saturday evening 
in the auditorium of the Carnegie 
Library. The social was a success 
in all respects, the committee used no 
little energv in devising plans to draw 
and attract the student body. 

The money that was taken in Satur- 
day evening is to be used to pay the 
tuition of a man for next year who 
will be proficient in football, basket 
ball and base ball. 

Miss Mae Meyer was awarded a 
large Lebanon Valley shield for hav- 
ing polled the largest number of votes 
in the "Popular Girl Contest," which 
had been in progress for a week or 
more. 

Excellent refreshments were served, 
consisting of ice cream and cake, after 
which the following program was ren- 
dered : Piano Solo, Mae Meyer; Quar- 
tette, Misses Gingrich, Christeson, 
Lottie Spessard and Bachman; Sketch,. 
Messrs. Ischy and Weigle ; Vocal Solo, 
Edith Gingrich; Awarding of prize to 
Mas Meyer. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



KALOZETEAN 
HUMOROUS PROGRAM 

Vocal Solo, Impromptu; Lecture on 
Farming, Victor Heffelfinger; Quar- 
tette, Dunlap, Biever, Arndt and 
Stager; Sketch John Lyter and Harry 
Charlton ; Debate : Resolved. That all 
juniors should develop a moustache. 
Affirmative Paul Strickler and Mason 
Long; Negative George Williams and 
lien Meyer; Short Stories, Society; 
Chorus, "There is a whale," Society; 
Oration, Impromptu; Monologue, Ivan 
Ressler; Examiner, Editor, Dunlap. 
CLIONIAN 

Piano Solo, Sara Strickler; Sam 
Llojd, the Brain Teaser Clara Horn; 
Reading, Verda Snyder; Piano Solo, 
Catharine Moaer; April Fool Story, 
Ruth E. Engle; Judge Linsey and 
Woman's Suffrage, Nell Seltzer; Vocal 
Duett, Evelyn Weidman, Naomi Ely; 
Olive Branch, Editor. 

PHILOROSMIAN 

American Club Life, L. B. Harnish; 
Revolt against Diaz in Mexico, S. B. 
Groh; Debate: Resolved, That Con- 
gress should pass the bill recommended 
by the administration for the increase 
of second-class postal rates. Affirma- 
tive, Maurice Leister, E. H. Carmany, 
Negative, I. K. Potter, J. K. Lehamn ; 
Quartet, P. R. Koontz, L. A. Rodes, 
F. S. Hensel, L. L. Spessard ; College 
Diversions, Edward Smith ; Not yet, 
but soon, S. G. Ziegler. 

vvotThis^ase 

Maurice Metzger, L. V., '07, Appears 
Before Court for First Time 

Maurice Metzger, a young Middle- 
town attorney who was recently ad- 
mitted to practice law before the Dau- 
phin county court had his first case 
Monday before Judge Kunkel, and 
what is important to all voung lawyers, 
won a Jecision. 

Metzger's clients were William 
Richardson and Harrv Given, who 
were charged with stealing a keg of 
porter from H. 0. Holstein, a hotel 
man of Hummelstown. They had no 
attorney and Mr. Metzger was in- 
structed by the court to look after 
their interests. 

The defendants stated they are in 
the huckster business and were working 
in Hummelstown on the day the theft 



occurred. The keg was found along 
the' trolley tracks and they intended 
to take it to the Capitol City Brewing 
Co., at Harrisburg. Mr. Metzger 
showed that the evidence was too 
flimsy to substantiate the charge and 
in half an hour the men were acquitted 
by the jury. 



Inter-Class Game 

On Wednesday evening practially 
the entire student body went to 
Lebanon to witness the annual Basket- 
ball game between the Sophs and 
Freshies. The Freshmen had the ad- 
vantage in experiencce, both in- 
dividually and as a team. Early in 
the contest it was seen that the Fresh- 
men had the advantage but the Sophs 
fought pluckily to the end of the game 
which ended with the score of 25 to 10 
in favor of the Freshmen. 

Much unnecessary roughness was 
injected into the game, due largely to 
the intense rivalry between the two 
classes. 

As a preliminary game the Fat Men 
and Lean Men decided the much-dis- 
cussed championship in that line by 
the score of 14 to 6 in favor of the 
former. Line up. 

Sophomores— 25 Freshmen— 10 
Shearer, Ritchie forward Charlton 
E. Loser forward Strickler 
Heffelfinger center Light 
Ulrich guard Walter 

P. Loser guard H Kreider 

Field Goals. Heffelfinger, Light 3 
Charlton 3, E. Loser, Gruber. Goals 
from Foul. E. Loser 6, Strickler, 
Charlton 4. 

Stout Men— 14 Lean Men— 6 

Lehman forward Smith 

Marshall forward Saylor 

Hensel center Reed 

Rine guard Butterwick 

Plummer guard Frost 



Y. W. C. A. 

A very interesting and helpful 
meeting was held on Sunday afternoon. 
It was conducted by Miss Lottie Spes- 
sard who chose as her subject "Un- 
trodden Paths." She said in part: 
Each day we enter upon an untrodden 
path that we know nothing about. 
Yet, we need fear nothing since God 
is our leader, and is sure to guide us 
aright. Although the way is new to 
us God has trodden the way before us, 
and if we allow ourselves to be led by 
Him it is impossible to wander from 
the path of Truth. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



I G. SPBLDIH 



The 



Spalding 

TRADE MARK 




Is knewn throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Are the largest 
manufacturers in 
the world of 



Official 



Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 



IF YOH 



are in 
ter es t- 
e d in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have acopy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia o f What's 
New in Sport and 
is sent free or. 
request. 



A Q Spalding & Bro. 

1120 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to he as good 
as new with a full year,s guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 
STEPHEN HUBERTIS 



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Magazines and College Books 
Rebound. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Items of Interest 



Grace Smith visited her parents at 
her home in Shoemakersville over 
Sunday. 

W. A. Brunner '11, manager of the 
haseball team, spent several days 
during the last week at his home in 
New Bloomfield, Perry County. 

Artus 0. Kauffman, '11, spent the 
past week at is home in Dallastown, 
owing to the sudden death of his 
brother. The NEWS extends its 
deepest sympathies. 

The exceutive committee of the 
alumni association held a special 
meeting last Thursday evening after 
the mass meeting. It was attended 
by Messrs. Fred Light, '00, J. Walter 
Esbenshade, '03, Dr. Seth Light, '00, 
D. M. W. Brrunner, '01, Prof. A. E* 
Shroyer, '00, and Prof. S. H. Derick- 
son, '02. 

S. O. Grimm, '12, editor of the 1912 
Bizarre, spent part of last week at 
his home in Red Lion, the guest of 
his parents. 

W. A. Brunner, '11, made the prin- 
cipal address at the U. B. Church of 
Duncannon, on Sunday evening. S. 
G. Ziegler, '11, is pastor of this con- 
gregation. 

Rev. Ira Lowery, a former student 
of the college was a visitor at the 
college several days last week. Mr. 
Lowery expects to enter the senior 
class of the college next fall. 

A meeting of the Executive bnard 
of the college was held in the Presi- 
dent's office last Tuesday ' afternoon. 
Those in attendance were Preisdent 
Keister, Rev. W. H Washinger, D. 
D., Hon. W. H. Ulrich, Mr. Benj. F. 
Engle, Mr. A. S. Kreider. 

Mrs. Violette Freed and Mr. E. A. 
Spessard visited in Hershey on Sunday 
last. 

Earnest H. Sellers, of Carlisle and 
Edward Wright, of Harrisburg, visited 
Leray B. Harnish, '14, over Sunday. 
Mr. Sellers is a Junior in Dickinson 
College. Carlisle. 



jCebanon UaUey 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are tinder the con- 
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Write for catalogue 
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Have Your Printing Done by 

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ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Who made a home run ? No one. 
But you will if you select your Bails, 
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Standard Steam Laundry and 
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27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa, 

/Represented at College 

fT" Full line of College Post Caras, 
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Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
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Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

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COIiIiEGE flEWS 



LEBANON VALL 



F >r, 

Vrof S 



-10.12 |^ 



Volume II. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Aptdl 4, 1911 



No. 26 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Opening Game 

L. V. MAKES GOOD SHOWING 
AGAINST MERCERSBURG 

With plenty of ginger and grit the 
Lebanon Valley boys opened their base- 
ball season with the strong Mercers- 
burg Academy team at Mercersburg on 
Saturday. Altho defeated, the boys 
are in no way discouraged at the out 
come, nor at the prospects for the sea- 
son. This being the first game of the 
season, and considering the cold 
weather of last week, the L. V. team 
showed splendid form. Little pitched 
a splendid game, having seven strike- 
outs to his credit. Captain Karnish 
set a swift pace for his team by pro- 
curing three safe hits out of four times 
at bat. 

Not until the last inning did the 
local boys score ; the hits being well 
scattered. In the fourth inning with 
two out, Harnish procured his second 
hit of the game. Smith followed with 
a hit, but Charles failed to connect 
when a hit would have meant a run. 
Our only score came in the ninth when 
Lyter reached first on an error and 
stole second. Harnish again came to 
bat, singled and Lyter scored. 

Mercersburg's runs were due largely 
to their ability to hit when hits meant 
runs. In the second, Legore hit for 
three bases, and came in on Etting's 
hit. Oberle scored in the third. In 
the fifth, three runs were scored, two 
coming in on Hanks' triple. The line 
up follows : 

LEBANON VALLEY 



Carmany, ss 



3 1 1 



Calendar. 





AB 


R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Hummel, If 


4 








1 








Lyter, 3b 


4 


1 








2 


1 


Walsh, c 


4 








10 


1 


1 


Lehman, lb 


4 








10 








Harnish, rf 


4 





3 











Smith, 2b 


4 





1 


1 


1 





Charles, cf 


2 








1 


1 





Little, p 


3 











3 






Totals 


32 


1 


4 


24 


9 


2 


MERCERSBURG 










AB R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Hartsel, If 


4 


1 


1 


2 








Eichelberger, ss 


4 











1 





Hanks, cf 


4 





1 


1 








Legore, lb 


4 


1 


1 


7 








Etting, c 


3 





i 


12 








Menhefee, c 


1 








2 








Krepps, rf 


2 








1 








Bard, rf 


1 








1 





1 


Hishman, 3b 


2 











1 





Bowers, 2b 


3 


1 





1 








Oberle, p, 


1 


o 








4 





Totals 


29 


5 


4 


27 


6 


1 



R H E 

Lebanon Valley 00000000 1-1 4 2 
Mercersburg 1 1 3 x— 5 4 1 
Three base hits Hanks, Legore. 
Two base hit, Hartsel,. Base on 
balls, off Little, 2. Hit by pitcher, 
Charles, Oberle, Walsh, Double 
play Charles to Carmany. Stolen 
bases, Lyter, Harnish, Etting, 
Bowers, Oberle. Time 1 hr. 45 m. 
Umpire Wills. 



Special Committee 

For some time the problem of the 
best form of government at Lebanon 
Valley has been puzzling a large num- 
ber of minds. At last we hope a con- 
clusion is in sight. The Executive 
Committee of the Board of 'Irustees 
took up the matter at its meeting last 
week, and finally decided that a com- 
mittee of three from each, faculty, 
student body and executive committee 
be selected to settle the difficulty. 
The committee of the student body 
composed of Messrs. Ehrhart, Ellis 
and Butterwick have already met with 
the faculty committee, consisting of 
Profs. Shenk, Shroyer and Spessard, 
and decided on a form of student 
government. A meeting of the three 
committees will be held in the near 
future, at which time it is hoped the 
plans submitted will be ratified, and 
student government established on a 
firmer basis than ever. 



Tuesday, April 4, 4 p. m.— Baseball, 
L. V. Reserves vs., Lebanon High 
School at Lebanon ; 6 p. m. Prayer 
Meeting. 

Friday, April 7,8:45 p. m.— Kalozetean 
Anniversary, Engle Conservatory. 

Saturday, April 8,— Baseball, L. V. 
vs., Gettysburg at Gettysburg: L. V. 
Academy vs., Reading High School 
at Annville. 




Alumni 




Miss Louise Kreider, '08, Conserva- 
tory, after spending her vacstion at 
her home in Annville, left on Monday 
morning for Wells College. 

Miss Lucy Seltzer, '10, of Lebanon, 
instructor of German, spent Saturday 
and Sunday with Miss Sal lie Kreider, 
'08. 

Samuel H. Waughtel, '07, a teacher 
in Marietta, Ohio, spent several days 
here last week, visiting friends. 

George N. Hoffer, '09, an instructor 
at Purdue Uniersityv, Lafayette, Ind., 
has renewed his subscription for the 
"College News." 

Prof. L. E. McGinnes, '99, of 
Steelton addressed a men's meeting 
in the Hershey Y. M. C. A. on Sunday, 
March 26. 

There was a meeting 'of the Execu- 
tive committee of the Alumni Assoocia- 
tion last week. The committee is 
composed of Dr. Seth A. Light, Pres. 
of association, Fred W. Light, '00, 
Chairman, Dr. M. W. Brunner, '01, 
Prof. A. E. Shroyer '00, Prof. S. H. 
Derirkson, '02. J. Walter Esbenshade, 
'03. Rev. S. Edwin Rupp, '01 Prof. 
Ed. M. Balsbaugh, '01 are also mem- 
bers, of the committee but were not 
present at the meeting. 

(Continued on page 4) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College flerjus 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 

E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 

F. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 

HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies j els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 ds. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

With the coming of spring comes 
also the change in leadership of various 
college organizations and enterprises. 
Not among the least of these, locally, 
is the change of the COLLEGE NEWS 
staff. Our time of service is rapidly 
drawing to a close, when we will lay 
down the work tc let others continue 
it. The issue of next week will be 
the special Kalozetean Anniversary 
Number, and the following week the 
new staff will assume its duties. 

The work of the past year has been 
very pleasant to every member of the 
staff. The suggestions received from 
alumni and friends were good and ap- 
preciated by the editors, and if they 
were not put into immediate use it was 
because of an impossibility to do so at 
the time. Student body, alumni and 
friends have stood by us nobly all the 
year. For their hearty support and 
interest we wish to thank them, for 
without them our efforts would have 
proved futile. The editors also wish 
to thank every member of the faculty 
from whom help and encouragement 
was received. 

One may think little work is re- 
quired and small responsibility is as- 
sumed in the publication of so small a 
paper. But to those in charge, it is 
important that the paper be the best 



paper possible, and that they receive 
all the help you and your friends are 
able to give. 

So before going out of office, the 
present staff wishes to thank most 
heartily all who have rendered any 
assistance,and at the same time urge 
equal and increased interest and co- 
operation when the new board of Edi- 
tors assumes its duties. We hope to 
announce our successors in next week's 
issue. 



L. V. vs. GETTYSBURG 

Will Meet on the Diamond at Gettys- 
burg on Saturday 

The second baseball game of the 
season will be played next Saturday 
with the Gettysburg College team. 
Every fellow should be out to practice 
every evening. Captain Harnish is 
working hard, and doing his best to 
develope a winning team. We believe 
he is doing all he can, and feel safe 
in saying that with the coaching he 
expects his team to get, we will not 
be disappointed. Don't be discouraged 
over the defeat last week. The boys 
played a splendid game and made a 
fine showing. They feel that they 
did their best, and why should the rest 
of the students feel down hearted over 
the outlook? Rather come out and 
help them to prepare for the next 
game and avoid another defeat. Give 
them all the encouragement you can, 
rather than find fault with the captain 
and manager. They are doing their 
part well and if you do yours in like 
manner a good season will surely 
result. 



Root! Root for L. V. A. 

The strictly "All Academy" base- 
ball team met its first defeat on the 
home field last Saturday at the hands 
of the Annville Tigers. The day was 
extremely cold and the high wind made 
it very difficult to judge the ball. 

Harry Denlinger was behind the 
bat and Irvin Kreider was in the box. 

Meyer on first, Long on second, Dun- 
lap on third Eby short stop, Light, 
Leister and Shannon completed the 
plucky little team that met the semi- 
professionals. 

The boys played a splendid game 
considering that it was their first 
attempt for the season. Special men- 



tion should be made of the battery 
Clearheaded and unmoved by a slight 
lack of support from the field they 
fanned their opponents one by one. 
Runs were made by the Tigers chiefly 
on errors of the Academy team. 
These errors were made by inex- 
perienced men who will make good 
with practice. The boys made a 
striking appearance in their new uni- 
form—grey suits, red stockings and 
caps. 

The best feature of the game was 
the spirit, whole souled united spirit, 
for L. V. A. Academy colors waved 
from the grandstand. Academy songs 
rent the air and Academy boys and 
girls promenaded the breezy grounds to 
keep warm and to show their ardor. 
This same spirit has paid their suits 
and has made it possible for them to 
offer on the home ground to all their 
friends at least eight games. Four 
hotly contested games will be with 
the Reading, Myerstown and Annville 
High schools and the Freshman class 
of Lebanon Valley College. The 
coming game is next Saturday April 8 
on the heme grounds with the Reading 
High School. Practice games will be 
held toward the close of the week. 
Let your colors fly that day, for L. V. 
A. is going to win. 

Tickets are on sale at the book-store. 

They can also be procured from 
members of the financial committee: 
Messrs. Long and Denlinger and Miss 
Brightbill. Price of tickets, fifteen 
cents. Season tickets guaranteeing 
at least eight games may be had for 
$1.00. L. V. C. tickets for the base 
ball season of the college also admit 
to the Academy games. 

Friends of the college and Academy 
should encourage the pluck and loyalty 
that has characterized the work of 
the boys this year. They faced strong 
opposition. They overcame it glor- 
iously, and now all are seeing that 
the cultivation of this spirit in the 
Academy must bring a richer athletic 
fruitage in the college in the years to 
come. 

Thus while the boys were defeated 
by a score of 14 to 3 they had worked 
faithfully, they took their defeat 
heroically and have been nerved on to 
put a hotter contest for the coming 
Saturday. Who does not want to see it ! 



COLLEGE NEWS 



at* 

rrtiuPHts % Ijmtor nf ynur prrsnirr at its 
©Ittrhj-fnitrtl) Amttwrsarg lExe rtwz 
Jritau, femtt0, April #mtti!j 
N**wk*tt ifttttflrro limit 
at stxtm fDrtg-fe n'rlork 
^latgle (toarroatanj of Mum 
Aumtillr, Pntusnluama 



Mathematical Round Table 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Round Table was held Wednesday 
evening March 29, when a most in- 
teresting program was rendered. The 
program was one of the best the Round 
Table has ever had, and we were 
delighted with the splendid discussions 
on the part of the members following 
the rendition of the several numbers. 
L. L. Spessard gave a reading of 
mathematical stories which were 
humorous and yet not lacking in their 
mathematical significance. Oliver 
Butterwick then presented the nine 
point circle which proved a very in- 
teresting mathematical phenomenon. 
L. B. Harnish presented a discussion 
of the methods of teaching Mathe- 
matics. In his discussion he gave 
decided prominence to the laboratory 
method of teaching mathematics and 
was followed by a pro and con con- 
sideration of the merits and defects of 
such a method. 




Items of Interest 




College Ministerium 

A large percentage of members of 
the College^Ministerial Association at- 
tended the regular meeting on Thurs- 
day evening in the Men's Dormitory. 
An interesting paper was read by A. 
S. Beckley, '12, on Sermonizing. 
Much valuable infurmation was re- 
ceived from the paper. An open dis- 
cission followed. The next meeting 
will be held at the home of Phares 
Gibble on Maple Street. 



Mrs. Mary Rigler, of Annville will 
spend several days next week visiting 
her daughter, Margaret, who is at- 
tending Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. 

Miss LaVerne Keister, will arrive 
at her home in Annville on Thursday 
to spend her spring vacation with her 
parents. 

W. Albert Brunner, '11, made a busi- 
ness trip to Hershey on Friday evening. 

Donald Keister, '12, made a trip to 
New York on a week end visit to his 
sister, 'Miss LaVerne Keister. who is 
at present taking work at Pratt In- 
stitute. 

Last Friday evening a number of 
students attended an entertainment 
given by the pupils of Miss Sallie 
Kreider's school. Miss Kreider who 
was a member of the class of '08 is 
teaching the Kreider School, located 
about four miles from Annville. 

Miss Minnie Spessard chaperoned 
the walkers. The following composed 
the party: Misses Light, Yarkers, 
Bertha Spessard, Lehman, Gingrich, 
Ora and Katbryn Bachman, Horn, 
Weidler and Minnie Spessard; Messrs. 
Ehrhart, Mulhollen, McConel, Lester 
Spessard, Lehman, Botts, Weidler, 
and Loser. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 





Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



0. G. 



The 



Spalding 

TRADE MARK 




Is known throughout 
the world as a 

Guarantee of 
Quality 



Are the largest 
manufacturers in 
the world of 

Official 
Equipment 

For All 
Athletic 
Sports and 
Pastimes 

are in 
ter es t- 
e d in 
Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia o f What's 
New in Sport and 
is sent free on 
request. 



IF YOU 



A. Q. Spalding & Bro. 

1120 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year,s guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 
STEPHEN HUBERTIS 

Book Binder 

320 Market St., HARRISBUKG, PA. 

Magazines and College Books 
Rebound. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUMNI NOTES 

(Continued from page 1) 



E. M. Gehr, '07, New Hampton, 
N. Y. writes that owing to the illness 
of his wife he has been unable to finish 
his course at Union Theological 
Seminary, and is now preaching at 
New Hampton. 

Isaac Rissmiller, '06, Sup'r., Prin- 
cipal of tne schools of Oxford town- 
ship, Warren county, has shown a 
great deal of interest in his Alma 
Mater and will possible have a student 
to send here, next year. Mr. Riss- 
miller graduated from U. P. with A. 
M. in 1909. 

A. B. Hess, '01, City Supt., of 
schools of Larimore, North Dakota, 
has shown his loyalty to the school by 
paying his alumnal dues in full. 

Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. Joint 
Session 

The meeting on Sunday was led by 
Samuel 0. Grimm, speaking on the top- 
ic "What Do W 7 e Have to Give to The 
World?" A missionary program was 
to be presented but through some misun- 
derstanding no program was prepared. 
The leader selected a general mission- 
ary topic, and in answer to the ques- 
tion as to what we have to give to the 
Non-Christian world named four things 
that we have to give to those who 
know not God. First, we should teach 
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KALOZETEAN ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 



. 



.\1 



COIiliEGE flEtfS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. Annville, Pa. 


, Tuesday, Appil X, 1911 


fio. 2$ 


Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, 


at the post office at A'nnville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 







KALOZETEAN LITERARY SOCIETY CELE- 
BRATES THIR TY-FOURTH ANNIVERSARY 

Splendid Program Rendered — Engle Hall Beautifully Decorated for the Occasion—Reception 
Tendered About Four Hundred Friends and Visitors 



To one of the largest audiences seen 
at Lebanon Valley at an occasion of 
this kind, the Kalozeteans rendered 
their thirty-fourth anniversary pro- 
gram on Friday evening.- After 
Keim's Orchestra had rendered several 
pleasing selections the speakers were 
ushered to their respective seats. 
Over four hundred people greeted the 
performers with their applause. In 
the sea of faces one could see many 
from Annville. Lebanon, Palmyra, 
Harrisburg, Myerstown, Eversjn, 
Philadelphia, New York and from 
nearby towns and cities. Over one 
hundred young people came up from 
Lebanon. Albright college was rep- 
resented by about twenty members 
from the Neocosmian Literary society. 

The decorations were simple artistic 
and original. In the chapel red and 
gold streamers, the colors of the 
society, were used to good advantage 
in a very beautiful arrangement, and 
suspended from the ceiling in front 
of the stage, was a large red banner 
with the word "Kalozetean" in gold 
letters. The numerals seventy-seven 
and eleven were very tastefully placed 
on each side, the former numeral being 
the date of organization. The stage 
was banked with palms and ferns, in- 
termingled with the colors of the 
society. The whole combination pre- 
senting a very pleasing and excellent 
effect. 

The entire program was well ren- 
dered and judging from the applause 
it was much appreciated. In fact 
every number on the program was a 
complete success. 



Ivan J. McKenrick, '05, conserva- 
tory, now organist of First Presbyterian 
church at Ebensburg and practising law 
at the same place, was the first to ap- 
pear on the program. He rendered in 
a masterful and verv pleasing manner 
the organ prelude, the rendition of 
which was of the highest order and 
reflects great credit cn his ability as 
a musician of the first rank, adding 




w. o. ELLIS 



greatly to the success of the evening's 
program. 

The Kev. S. Edwin Rupp, '02, 
pastor of the Trinity United Brethren 
church, Lebanon, Pa., offered the In- 
vocation.. 

Francis Richard Kennedy, '11, in 
his usual clear, forcible and original 
way delivered the president's address. 
It was in fact an oration based upon 
the "Value of Exchange," interwoven 



with much of the inspiration which 
Kalozetean has given to him, and 
showing that we may carry our society 
spirit with us into the practical affairs 
of life. 

Mr, u Chester E. Rettew, '12, in a 
new, smooth, and pleasing form 
delivered the first oration of the 
evening. He brought before his au- 
dience his theme in good style, with 
grace and clearness. His subject 
"As a Man Thinketh" was treated 
thoroughly, and he showed how the 
power of thought had influenced 
civilization, bringing man to his pre- 
sent position ; above the beasts and a 
"litt'e lower than the angels." He 
captivated his audience at the start, 
and held their attention throughout. 

The, "Plantation song" given by a 
carefully trained chorus of nine voices 
was one of the most enjoyable numbers 
on the program. The chorus consisted 
of Messrs. Frost, Reed, Shearer, 
Hajes, Charlton, Ulrich, Young, 
Gibble. Long. 

Mr. J. W. Ischy, oratory, '11, 
college, '12, gave an excellent 
reading and his selection of 
"Scenes from the Rivals," showed 
good taste He presented with his 
characteristic force, vividness of im- 
agination and clearness of enuncia- 
tion this great masterpiece In his 
interpretation of the characters he 
showed rare ability, keeping the atten- 
tion of his audience focused during 
the entire rendition of his part. As 
the production was humorous and 
entertaining it added in a marked de- 
gree to the success of the program. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Mr. William Otterbein Ellis, '11, 
in his unique, forcible and eloquent 
manner presented his theme '"Dreams 
and Dreamers" to an appreciative au- 
dience. He enlisted the keenest at- 
tention from the beginning to the end. 
His oration abounded in illustrations 
drawn from nature and life. There 
were pictures of real and beautiful im- 
ages, and his production deserves to be 
the best that has been delivered in 
recent years, adding new laurels to 
this oratorical son of Kalozetean. 
He held his audience spellbound, had 
great control over his voice, treating 
sympathetically this great subject. 

Mr. Frederick Light, '00, rendered 
two violin solos with his usual skill 
and again demonstrated to the admiring 
crowd his great musical talent. 

What turned out to be the most 
original as well as the most attractive 
number on the program was the pro- 
duction of Mr. Fred Frost, '11. The 
Essayist departed from the usual cus- 
tom and presented "A Bard of Erin.'' 

The writer showed rare ability in 
dealing with Thomas Moore and his 
reading of the essay was good and at 
the same time so sympathetic as to 
win the genuine applause of the 
crowded audience. 

As a climax to his essay a mixed 
quartette, consisting of Mrs. Dr. 
Gerberich and Miss Edi'h Frantz of 
Lebanon, Harry Ulrich, '14, of Harris- 
burg and Alfred Strickler, of Lebanon, 
rendered one of Moore's best known 
selections. The silence maintained in 
the audience was sufficient testimony 
to the greatness of this part. The 
quartette needs no commendation for it 
was of the highest order, rendered 
with accuracy melody and harmony. 
This part was a pleasant surprise to 
everyone present and was appreciated 
accordingly. 

Keim's orchestra concluded one of 
the best programs that has ever been 
given in recent years. It was a com- 
plete success. 

A reception was held immediately 
afterwards in the halls of Kalo at 
which over four hundred guests were 
served with refreshments consisting of 
punch, ice cieam and cake. The 
society halls were very beautifully 
decorated with numerous pennants, 
banners and steamers of red and gold. 
It was a brilliant gathering, many of 
the fairest daughters of Annville, Pal- 
myra, Harrisburg, Everson and 



Lebanon were present. Great credit 
is due to the untiring efforts of the 
various committees. The chairmen of 
the various committees were, Messrs. 
Kennedy, Ellis, Snavely, Lyter, 
Williams and Chas. Ulrich. 



President's Address 

The Value of Exchange 




ADIES AND GENTLEMEN: 
In behalf of our society I 
extend to you a most cordial 
and hearty welcome to these 
our Anniversary exercises. We ask 
you to join with us in celebrating 
this occasion with hearts overflowing 
with peace and friendship. 

In eighteen seventy-seven Kaloze- 
tean was born. Since that time we 
have been going onward, upward, 
forward. We have been walking on 
that untrodden path that leads ultima- 
tely to the realization of our ideal. 

KALOZETEAN, the word meaning 
as most of you know, "seekers after 
the beautiful," for four and thirty 
years we have been seeking the beauti- 
ful in every sense of the word and 
every mile-stone on our path seems to 
be electrified tonight. The arc-light of 
past Anniversaries seems to be re- 
flected in all its brilliancy on this 
occasion. 

During all these years, in the 
circle that we call KALOZETEAN, 
► we have cherished each others ideals 
and shared our greifs and sorrow. We 
have seen as it were, the sun rising in 
the East and mounting on its way 
toward the Zenith, slowly we have 
seen it sink in the West and dis- 
appear. While in the silent watches 
of the night its soft light has been 
reflected from the varied constella- 
tions of the heavenly bodies: and as 
the sun was lost to sight, so from 
many of us our hopes and our ambi- 
tions have faded and during these years 
of difficulty only the blackness of des- 
pair could be seen. Tonight, KALO- 
ZETEAN offers up her grateful praise 
to the loyal men, who, during her 
history have striven, triumphed and 
made it possible for our organization 
to exist 

As we lock back on our history, 
years of hopefulness, achievement and 
progress, we would not forget those of 
our number who are not with us to- 
night, whose names have been written. 
Especially one, who, in recent years 
endeared himself to all with whom he 



came in contact. The name of Harvey 
Herr may not be found on the scroll of 
fame: but in our circle we honor and 
will revere his memory. 

YOU may ask us and we may ask 
ourselves these questions. What has 
produced this result? What has made 
it possible for our organization to 
exist so long? We cannot answer 
fully these questions tonight; but one 
of the prime factors in producing this 
result is due to the principle of ex- 
change. Young men have found 
within our halls something to exchange 
with each other. As our motto 'Palma 
non sine pulvere' no palms without 
dust, would lead us to believe, we ex- 
change no easily acquired virtue, nor 
any unworthy thoughts; but we ex- 
change those things of life that are 
worth while, those things that endure, 
those that are eternal. 

Many young men have passed through 
our halls during these thirty and four 
years, and have gone forth to meet 
with the many problems of life. 
THEY have seen corruption in every 
form, they have realized what the 
struggle for existence really means 
and they have felt the need of the 
material things of life as well as the 
spiritual things. Their characters had 
to be tested in the lurid heat of 
worldliness; but if they have carried 
with them the spirit of Seventy-Sev- 
en, that we cherish here. This KALO 
spirit will sustain them. 

From the nucelus of social service 
men today are extending their influence 
in all directions and receiving un- 
conscious though it may be, something 
in return. Never have college men 
and women been so actively associated 
in extending the principles of a world- 
wide democracy. Allow me to refer you 
to a few examples of this same prin- 
ciple, the BIG BROTHER movement 
in New York, the workers in our juve- 
nile courts, the missionaries in our 
cities and in the Foreign field, the Y. 
M. C. A, workers, as well as the 
church workers and quite recently the 
BIG SISTER work has been inaugura- 
ted. All these activities illustrate 
very well the method of exchange. 

In every direction this principle is 
in operation. The student by our side 
lacks something that we can give 
to him and we need something that 
only he can give us. The college 
professor has his claim on us anJ 
we demand something from him 



COLLEGE NEWS 



in return. Not merely, the details 
of a science, the mastery of a lan- 
guage, the accumulations of history 
and philusophy, or even all these 
added together; but he craves for 
and we hunger after personality. 

By coming in contact with men and 
women of noble ideals and worthy lives 
we learn instinctively the true value 
of life, We see life, not only, as a 
time in which to accumulate a for- 
tune, not only as a time in which to 
saturate our minds with book-lore, nor 
as a time in which to gain an unfair 
advantage over our brother. How- 
ever, we should see life as a time for 
exchange. We should learn the true 
lesson of service, the real value of ex- 
change. If we should be inspired by 
some noble Hie I think we would feel 
the responsibility of extending to 
others who may be less fortunate than 
we are, or who may have a less limited 
vision, the real value of exchange. 

There are more men needed in this 
age, who will be cheerfully willing to 
exchange with others. Of all the 
varied forces which men possess, 
nothing is more desirable for ex- 
change today than sunshine For as 
physical sunshine is necessary in order 
that leafy plants may grow and 
develop to their full size and maturity. 

For we know that the suns rays 
must penetrate their leafy structures 
and assist in building up the complex 
tissues so that finally the full glory 
of the plant may blossom forth, re- 
produce and bring forth like plants. 

So then in the same way we need 
seek the radiating sunshine of healthy 
optimism from the Great Source if we 
desire true success. Having found 
this power-house we can go forth 
among men charged with this energy, 
to shed our light in the dark places, 
where men women and children need 
it so much. Where the chldren are 
being stunted by the grasping hand of 
the greedy parisites of the industrial 
world, who force them to labor long 
hours for a low wage, or to accept the 
only alternatives, degradation or 
starvation. WE can shed this light 
in the places where disease germinates 
and where crimes are bred. The social 
unrest of the present is in need of this 
soothing influence. 

Let us crystallize our appreciation, 
of life into sweet charity for all. 
Radiate Optimism ! Be Optimistic ! 
May we not shed this light of healthy 



optimism in the places where it is 
needed and forget the trivialities of 
life that hinder the smooth running of 
our life's course. Let the full glory 
of our personality cast its soft, golden 
and mellowing light upon some weary 
soul, so that they seeing our hopeful- 
ness may be lifted to higher ground 
and viewing with us the vista of a 
greater civilization, may hear with us 
the harmonies yet unheard while with 
their imagination they may ccnceive 
the beauty that formerly was hidden 
from them. Or as PAUL quotes from 
ISAIAH, "Eye hath not seen, nor ear 
heard, neither have entered into the 
heart of man, the things which GOD 
has prepared for them that love HIM. " 



As a Man Thinketh 

Following is the oration delivered by Chester 
E. Rettew, in condensed form. 



RULY has it been said, that a 
man's character is a great 
and beautiful image, hidden 
by wondrous mists, and that 
image which finally is seen, 



the 

when the mists have been rolled away, 
is the image which is made by the 
man's own Ideal, and his effort toward 




CHESTER E. RETTEW 



that Ideal. No man has a right to 
remain where he will be constantly 
subjected to the great temptations of 
poverty, nor secluded behind the mists 
of ignorance, hiding himself from the 
awakening light of intelligence. 

The speaker showed that man is not 
like dumb driven cattle, proded on, 
not able to resist the force behind, 
but was made in the image of God, to 
have dominion over the earth. Man 
must develope the talent which distin- 
guishes him from the beast. That 



prosperity begins in the mind and 
that as long as our mental attitude 
is hostile to our Ideal, we will never 
realize it. Quoting Marden, he 
showed that there are plenty of evi- 
dences in man's construction and envi- 
ronment, that he was made for in- 
finitely grander and more superb 
things, than the most fortunate of 
men now possess and enjoy. But 
that we cannot attain these superb 
things by thinking they are impossible, 
for no man can become prosperous, 
while he really expects or half expects 
to remain poor, for we tend to get 
what we expect, and to expect nothing 
is to get nothing, and we cannot work 
for one thing and expect something 
else. Everything is created mentally 
first. Want, lack and unhappiness do 
not fit man's divine nature. Too 
many people do not have enough faith 
in the good things intended for them, 
and are too often satisfied with the 
common place things of life, not striv- 
ing for what they desire. 

He referred to history and showed 
what a difference the Ideal dwelling 
in a man's heart makes in his own 
life. When Napoleon wanted to 
follow his Ideal to get the thing for 
which his eager soul longed, he be- 
lieved he could accomplish it and 
went at it, expecting to do so. There 
were no Alps for him. Showing that 
prison doors did not hinder Galileo 
from making discoveries in Science, 
nor blindness check the great intellect 
of Euler, the mathematician, the 
speaker proved that a man with an in- 
vincible purpose in him is not daunted 
by difficulties, but is bound to succeed. 

In an interesting manner he showed 
how Columbus discovered America, 
because he believed in himelf. That 
amidst the most trying conditions, and 
in the face of great difficultes, he 
did what other men thought impossible 
because he believed he couM. . . the 
cherishing and entertaining of such a 
marvelous thought developed into such 
a marvelous deed. 

A general spends almost as much 
time in making his plans as in ex- 
ecuting them. Just as an architect 
knows how the building will look, even 
before the ground is broken, just so 
is every thing we do, the outcome of 
our thoughts, and our mental attitude 
must corrrespond to the reality we 
seek. No matter what may be our 
Ideal, unless our mental attitude cor- 



COLLEGE NEWS 



responds to it, we shall never realize 
it. Had Columbus cherished his Ideal, 
with the thought that it was im- 
possible, he never would have crossed 
the Atlantic. Educators say, that 
thoughts are things that are incorpo- 
rated into the life and become part 
of the character, and that if we har- 
bor a low thought, if we entertain a 
mean or selfish thought, that Thought 
will serve as a means to attract us in 
that direction. But on the other hand, 
if we cherish a noble thought, if we 
harbor a lofty Ideal in our mind and 
put forth every effort in pursuit of 
that Ideal, our lives will eventually 
correspond. 

Our whole being is simply our 
mind in action. If our mind consists 
of good and noble thoughts, w^ our- 
selves will be good and noble. We will 
never amount to more than our Ideal; 
neither will we amount to as much if 
our mental attitude is hostile to it. 
To reach posperity— to attain success 
—to be of help to the world we must 
give something to the world. If we 
can give no more, we can give our- 
selves. But what good will we be to 
the world unless we have made the 
most of the best that is in us; unless 
we have developed our talent ; unless 
we have a lofty Ideal, in fact, the 
highest possible Ideal, and unless we 
set our whole mental being, and there- 
fore ourselves in pursuit of that Ideal? 

If our Ideal is the best possible, our 
striving toward it will so mix the 
elements in us 

"That nature might stand up and 
say to all the world 'Thh was a 
man. "' 



Scenes from "The Rivals" 

The quarrel and the reconciliation 
scenes from "The Rivals." by Sheri- 
dan. Characters: Sir Anthony Abso- 
lute; Captain Jack Absolute. 

Previous to these two scenes, Cap- 
tain Jack, under the assumed name of 
Beverly has won the affections of Miss 
Lydia Languish and has come to Bath 
to make arrangements to elope with 
her. In the meantime his father, Sir 
Anthony has also arrived at Bath and 
he and his old friend Mrs. Malaprcp 
have made arrangements that Jack is 
to marry the latter's niece, Lydia 
Languish. 

In ' * The Quarrel ' ' scene Sir Anthony 
announces to Jack that he has decided 
that Jack shall marry a certain young 



lady, but does not tell him who the 
lady is. The Captain refuses to 
promise to marry the girl without 
knowing who she is. This angers Sir 
Anthony and he goes out in a passion 
declaring he will never see Jack again, 




j. w. ISCHY 



and disowns him. Between the two 
scenes Jack has discovered that his 
father wants to force him to marry 
the girl with whom he was planning 
to elope. So when he meets his father 
again he pretends that he has repented 
of his obstinacy and is willing to 
marry the girl hip father desires him 
to marry. Sir Anthony is delighted, 
forgives Jack at once, and arranges 
for a meeting betwen his son and the 
young lady. 



Dreams and Dreamers 

The following is the substance of the oration 
delivered by Mr. W. O. Ellis. 



mm 



[/THOUGH we know some- 
thing of the worlds about us, 
yet is it not a fact that our 
thoughts and minds wander 
below the horizon into a sub-consciou* 
realm comparatively unknown. Into 
a realm of visions, a realm of dreams. 
And we feel as Sir Isaac Newton, 
"with all our knowledge, like gather- 
ing shells on an infinite sea." Many 
are the worlds about us. Helen 
Keller lives in a peculiar, invisible 
and intangible sphere. In her world 
floats no sound, the rustle of the forest, 
the harmonies of music, the magic of 
the spoken word enlist no thrill. 
Dawn and dusk, days and seasons are 
alike. The glory of summer, the 
colors of October are known to her only 
through the dim changes, in the 
warmth of her skin. Springtime does 



not appeal to her, at the time of the 
year according to the words of Long- 
fellow, 

"The bird sing in the thickets, 
The streamlets laugh and glisten, 
And all the air is full of fragrance. ' ' 

And we gifted with the seeing eye 
have pity for that stricken girl, but 
little do we realize that in some sense 
we are all Helen Kellers and that 
ours is a Helen Keller world. 

Suppose that by magic our ejes 
could be opened that we could see the 
filmy linps of light that reflect for us 
the landscape and the morning sky, 
that we could see the waves of sound 
that bear to us the carolling of the 
lark, that we could see without the aid 
of the microscope the many and beauti- 
ful forms of plant and animal life that 
do exist. Suppose that we could look 
into our future lives and see the rea- 
lization of our visions, our ideals; see 
our minds as they are and as they act. 

Would not tl is world of ours seem 
as wierd and[as entrancing as our visible 
world would appear to Helen Keller, 
could she but receive her 9ight? 

Yet beyond all that the eye can see, 
the ears can hear, the hands can feel, 
beyond either taste or smell, I say be- 
yond any native sense at all, there 
lies an unseen, unfelt, unheard uni- 
verse, whose fringe we are just feebly 
perceiving. 

It is true it is a visionary, idealistic 
world. But the dreamers are the 
saviours of this world. As the visible 
forms of nature are sustained by the 
invisible so men and women, in their 
trials and sins and sordid vocations 
are nourished by the beautiful visions 
of their solitary dreamers. Humanity 
will not forget its dreamers, it can- 
not let their ideals fade and perish. 
But it lives in them and as someone 
has said, "Humanity knows the 
dreams of its benefactors as the reali- 
ties which it shall one day see and 
know." 

Composer, sculptor, painter, in- 
ventor, poet, sage, these are the 
makers of the after world. The very 
architects of the universe. The world 
is beautiful because they have lived, 
without them laboring humanity would 
gradually die. 

But he who has a beautiful dream, 
,a lofty ideal in his heart shall one day 
realize it; Columbjs cherished a vision 
of another world and he discovered it; 
Sir Isaac Newton fostered a vision of 



COLLEGE NEWS 



gravitation and from the very time he 
saw the fall of the apple in the garden 
the fate of astrology was sealed; John 
Bunyan had a dream of a spiritual 
world of stainless beauty and perfect 
peace and he entered into it. 

Angel has said :"To desire is to 
obtain; to aspire is to achieve." 
Shall man's basest desires recieve the 
fullest measure of gratification and his 
highest aspirations starve for lack of 
sustenance? Such is not the law, such 
a condition of things can never exist, 
but is it not rather as that still small 
voice has said : "Ask and ye shall 
recieve, seek and ye shall find, knock 
and it shall be opened unto you." 

Dream lofty dreams, for as one 
dreams so shall he become. Carlyle 
has said, "A dream is a promise of 
what you shall one day be, an ideal is 
the prophesy of which you shall at last 
unveil." 

The greatest achievement was at 
first and for a time a dream. There 
stands the majestic oak in all its 
splendor, its beauty, and its magni- 
ficance. But how few ot our memo- 
ries go back to the time when this 
gigantic tree wasasleep in the acorn. 
And. as nature's forces come to bear 
upon it, it germinated, and by its 
gradually absorbing a little nourish- 
ment here and there among the hard 
particles of earth it breaks through 
the ground, pale, sickly, and famished. 

These conditions are not of long 
duration, for as the rising sun spreads 
its warming rays over Mother Earth 
the seedling takes on a new birth, in 
fact a new vitality and lo with the 
advancing summer this seedling is no 
longer a puny, delicate plant, but has 
become transformed into a vigorous and 
hardy young oak tree. As years roll 
around this tree grows in size and sta- 
ture, until it stands as a magnificant 
oak. A dream developed. A dream 
realized. Dreams; dreams, my 
friends, are nothing more than the 
seedling of realities. 

Your circumstances may be uncon- 
genial, but they shall not long remain 
so if you but perceive an ideal and 
strive to reach it. "One cannot 
stand still within and travel without." 
Just as a youth hard pressed by poverty 
and labor, unschooled and lacking all 
the arts of refinement, dreams of 
better conditions. He thinks of in- 
telligence, of refinement, of grace 
and beauty. Unrest urges him to 



action; a vision of a larger field takes 
possession of him and he utilizes all 
his spare time and means to the devel- 
opment of his latent powers and re- 
sources. Very soon, so altered has 
his mind become that the work-shop 
can longer hold him. It has become 
so out of harmony with his mentality 
that it falls out of his life as a gar- 
ment is cast aside. With the growth 
of his intellectual ability he passes 
out of it forever. Years later we see 
this youth as a fuli grown man, as a 
master of certain forces of the mind 
which he wields with world wide in- 
fluence and almost unequalled power. 
In his hands he holds the curds of gi- 
gantic responsibilities, he speaks and 
behold lives are changed. Men and 
women hang upon his words, remould 
their cnaracters, and as the sun is the 
center of our Solar System about 
which this earth and her neighbor 
planets revolve in one grand degree 
of harmony, so he becomes the fixed 
and luminous center around which in- 
numerable destinies revolve. He has 
realized the vision of his youth., he 
has become one with his ideal. 

And you too my friends will realize 
the vision of your hearts be it base, or 
beautiful, or a mixture of both, for 
truly has Elbert Hubbard said, "one 
always gravitates toward that which 
he secretly most loves." Into your 
hands will be placed the exact results 
of your own thoughts. You will 
receive that which you earn, no more, 
no less. You will become as strong as 
your controlling desire, as high as 
your dominant aspiration. In a word 
whatever your circumstances may be 
you will remain, rise or fall with your 
thoughts, your dreams, your ideals 




A Bard of Erin 

jOCTETY, as long as it can be 
moved to tender sympathy, 
will never allow the beauti- 
ful charms and harmonious 
strains of a true poet to die. This 
ultimation we accept as true. The 
sounds of the lyre and the passionate 
fire of poetry charms both the skilled 
and the unskilled, the brain worker or 
the body toiler. It gives to them in 
their idle hours of relaxation, higher 
aspirations, greater happiness, true 
courage and world wide success. For 
this reason Thomas Moore, a type of 
the auld sod is fresh in the memory 
of England and especially of Ireland, 



as the day when he first began to write. 

His mind was stirred by the soft, 
velvety, charms of music. His educa- 
tion in this art began early for at the 
age of ten he was an apt scholar of 
Samuel Whyte, producing imitations 
of his master's works. His first 
yearning for music was stimulated by 
a wise, kind, ambitious mother. His 
first musical instrument was an old 
harpsichord which was soon replaced 
by a pianoforte. Time was to show 
that this was the fountain from which 
was to flow his sweet, sparkling genius. 
"Music, "said Moore thirty years after- 
wards," was the only art for which 
was born with real national love, my 
poety such as it is has sprung out of 
my true feelings for music." Every 
one who is familiar with his lyrics 
will say, true. As a song writer 
Moore has never been surpassed. 

A calm, still, gentleness creeps 
over us as we read slowly, ebbing and 
flowing over his tide of passion, 

'Tis the last rose of summer 
Left blooming alone; 
All her lovely companions 
Are faded and gone; 
No flower of her kindred 
No rosebud is nigh, 
To reflect back her blushes 
Or give sigh for sigh. 

I'll not leave thee, thou, lone one 

To pine on the stem; 

Soon the lovely ones sleeping 

Go, sleep thou with them; 

Thus kindly I'll scatter 

Thy leaves on the bed, 

Where thy mates of the garden 

Lie scentless and dead. 

So soon I may follow 
When friendship's decay 
And from love's shining circle 
The gems drop away; 
When true hearts lie withered 
And fond ones are flown ; 
Oh ! Who would inhabit 
This bleak world alone? 

A great number of hymns are due 
to his untiring pen. The gieatest is. 

"Come Thou Disconsolate." 

His country had long wanted for a 
hand which would do justice to the 
matchless airs which Moore himself 
said defied all poetry to do. No 
country had more themes to expand of 
cruel, relentless oppressions, wit and 
pleasantry. With the aid of the 
musical taste of Stevenson and Powers, 
the publisher, the finest airs of Ireland 
were sought out which are known as 
the Irish Melodies. A spirituality of 
his song floats intangibly upon the 
hearts and ears of the people, the 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fiecus 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P. R. KOONTZ, '11 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

W. A. BRUNNER, '11 
E. A. SPESSARD, '11 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

W. O. ELLIS, '11 
P. R. KENNEDY, '12 
CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
S. O. GRIMM, '12 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, '11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

bodies of angels, as it were, floating 
around in the air from which tune they 
should never be discovered. Moore 
says that "the power of music is as 
great as the force of his poetry 1 hat i f 
it were detached from his puems the in. 
terest of the people would be greatly 
diminished. " 

One of his best melodies showing 
his wit and cleverness is, 

The time I lost in wooing, 

In watching and pursuing; 

The light that lies 

In womans eyes 

Has been my hearts undoing. 

Though wisdom oft has sought me 

I scorned the lore she brought me 

My only books 

Were woman's looks 

And folly's all they've taught me, 

No man was better fitted than he 
in the lighter vein of satire. Few 
wielded the weapon more surely or 
adroitly than he, sending stinging 
arrows from his ever ready quiver, 
Arrows tinged with the sharpest 
sarcasm, winged with feathers lrom 
the swan song. His irony was aimed 
at the Prince of Wales. But his 
wounds were not poisonous, for the 
injured ones soon got over his slights 
and smiled at them. His best satir- 
ical works are, Corruption, Intol- 
eiance and the Skeptic. It was in 
the singing role of the troubedor not 
the gown of the moralist that he 
shone most advantageously. 

What need is there for a higher 
criticism of one whose works show 



such high genius. Can any nation pro- 
duce a more polished or superior 
Iyri3t. The vigor of Burns is sur- 
passed by the gracefulness of Moore. 
He was a firm determined patriot, who 
loved to be in the limelight of society 
because of its strength, refinement and 
accomplishments. His character 
shows strong determination else he 
would have been spoile 1 by the petting 
and pamperings of the idle rich. He 
waa the soul of a self respected and 
noble nature. 

Of all the songs the one most known 
and best loved is today sung all over 




F. L. FROST 



the English speaking world and its 
tender words will live as long as 
memory lasts. 

"Believe me if all those endearing 
young charms which I gaze on so 
fondly today, 
Were to change by to-morrow and 

fleet in my arms, 
Like fairy gifts fading away. 
Thou wouldst still be adored as this 

moment thou art 
Let thy tenderness fade as it will. 
And around the dear ruins each 
wish of my heart 
Would entwine itself verdently still. " 
Echoing down through these 
years has come this masterpiece 
of song which Tom Moore has given 
us. Its beautiful melody sounding 
alike in mansion or cottage loved 
both by high and low, and although 
Tom Moore's body has crumpled to 
dust and its ashes of dead years gather 
upon his memory, the child of his 
poetic fancy lives and it seems that the 
echo of its lovely harmony comes again 
to me tonight. 



Items of Interest 

Mr. John Lyter, '14, entertained 
his brother Tom Lyter, of Harrisburg, 
over the Kalo anniverarsy. 

Miss Edna Hayes, of Everson, Pa., 
was the guest of her brother Warren 
H. Hayes, '14, last]week and attended 
Kalo anniversary. 

Miss Mary Shearer of Harrisburg, 
attended Kalo anniversary, with her 
brother Frank Shearer, '14. 

Mr. Ivan J. MacKenrick, ex '05, 
conservatory, now practising Law at 
Ebensburg, and organist at the First 
Presbyterian church of that city was 
a visitor at the college, and mingled 
with fiiends, during the last few days. 
Mr. MacKenrick rendered the organ 
prelude at the Kalo anniversary exer- 
cises on Friday evening. 

Miss Laverne Keister, a student at 
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn was home 
for the Kalo anniverasry. 

Mrs. Guy Gerberich, of Lebanon, 
attended Kalo anniversary. 

Miss Eidth Frantz, of Lebanon, at- 
tended Kalo anniversary. 

Mrs. S. H. Derickton, was confined 
to her home on Friday, baving taken 
suddenly HI. 

Dr. Bucher, of Lebanon was present 
on Friday evening at the anniversary 
exercises. 

The Neocosmian Literary Society of 
Albright College, Myerstown, Pa , 
was represented at the Kalo anniver- 
sary exercises by about half their 
membership. 

Mr. Ira Lowery, of Harrisburg, a 
former student of L. V. attended the 
Kalo anniversary execises on Friday 
evening. Mr Lowey will return to 
school next fall as a senior. 

Miss Sarah Rauch, of Lebanon, was 
a guest at the college on Friday and 
attended Kalo anniversary. 

Mr. Aaron Kreider, ex, '12, now a 
student at Cornell, attended the anni- 
versary exercises on Friday evening. 

Miss Edith Brunner, of Reading 
and Miss Catherine Balliet, of Myers- 
town, were the guests of Miss Josephine 
Urich, '14, and attended the Kalo 
anniversary exercises. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Alumni 




members of our organization forget 
his congenial and friendly disposition. 



Born to Professor, '07, Conservatory 
and^Mrs. Arthur R. Spessard at North- 
field, a hoy. 

Sallie Kreider, '08, was married on 
Friday evening at Columbus, Ohio, 
to Ralph J. Major a senior at Ohio 
State University. 

J. H. Maysilles, '95, has recently 
resigned his position with the American 
Locomotive Co., Schenectady, N. Y., 
to become Supt. of the Davenport 
Locomotive works at Davenport, Iowa. 
Mr. Maysilles' family will move to 
Davenport in May. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting was conducted by 
Miss Carrie Light. We began the 
"Life of Alice Freeman Palmer." 
Her childhood and girlhood were care- 
fully described by the leader. Alice 
Freeman Palmer was for some time 
president of Wellesley. She was 
greatly interested in and promoted the 
higher education of women. Although 
she occupied this high position in life 
she took great interest in all kinds of 
girls and helped them in any way she 
was able. The entire meeting proved 
very interesting It is intended to 
complete the study of her life this 
spring. 

Oratory Recital 

J. W. Ischy, a senior in the oratory 
department gave a recital at Lititz on 
the evening of April 8th, Mr. Ischy 
read to a very appreciative audience 
and many of those present expressed a 
desire to hear him again. 



Obituary 

Last year our society lost through 
death a most faithful and trusted 
member. Mr. Harvey E. Herr was 
born October 17th 1887 and died from 
typhoid fever August 10, 1910. He 
graduated from Annville High School 
in 1903; Lebanon Business College, 
1906; Lebanon Valley Academy, 1908 
and had he lived he would have been 
graduated from Lebanon Valley 
College this year. 

The Kalozetean Literary Society 
will always cherish his memory and 
it will never forget his ability in the 
class room, neither will the individual 




The following is a splendid tribute 
from the pen of Dr. Lawrence Keister, 
the president of the college* 

Sweet is the lesson that Jesus has taught, 
Welcome the message that Jesus has brought. 
Faithful I follow wherever he leads, 
Knowing he always has answered my needs. 

Life is his gift to us, precious and new, 
Death his appointment for me and for you, 
Welcome the day ! whether living or dead 
When we appear before Jesus our Head. 

Sweet is the breath of this earth's scented air. 
Sweeter the breath of the morn over there. 
Bright beams the sun in the midst of the sky, 
Brighter is heaven to faith's open eye. 

Calls he my spirit from earth far away ? 
Faithful I answer and glad to obey. 
Then let me go, my dear friends on the earth- 
Go to my Saviour in the home of my birth. 



L V.— Gettysburg 4-4 



GETTYSBURG 2 
IMPIRE 2 



REAL SCORE 
L. V. 4- <f GI 

Lebanon Valley played its second 
game of the season against Gettysburg 
on Nixon Field, Gettysburg, last 
Saturday. The entire game was played 
in salt and pepper weather causing 
frosty fingers to which all the errors 
of the game excepting that of the um- 
pire, who himself was the greatest 
error that ever handled an indicator, 
can be attributed. Our boys opened 
the game in fine style and kept this 
speed throughout the entire game, 
with a few errors, and those excusable. 
While the score was "4 and'' at the 
end of the 10th when our team had to 
leave the field to catch the train, even 
Gettysburg admitted the game to be 
ours, the tie owing its existence to an 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



umpire who selfconfessedly hadn't 
seen a rule book for three years and 
who evidently cribbed his exams in a 
correspondence school. Gettysburg 
came to bat at the end of the seventh 
with the score 4 to 1 in favor of L. V. 
Two men went down and one got to 
first. The next man had three balls 
called on him. When Little lined the 
next one over the man on first started 
to steal. Nelson throws the ball to 
second in time to catch his man. The 
umpire called him out. Our boys came 
running in, while the man caught at 
second galloped home closely pursued 
by the batter, the umpire having 
called the fourth ball. Smith asked 
the umpire who had picked up the ball 
to give it to him to tag the second 
runner, but the learned official said 
there were three outs. Under the 
persuasion of Gettysburg the umpire 
reversed his decision calling the man 
safe at second, because the fourth ball 
demanded a force, even tho the man 
started to steal before the ball was 
delivered. The two runs were donated 
to Gettysburg, instead of recalling 
the runners to the bases held at the 
"out." Rather than forfeit, our men 
scared the next men out. Nelson and 
Hummel were the star batters. Little 
was in fine form. 

GETTYSBURG 

R. H. 0. A. E. 

Doty 3b 110 

Fhuher ss 1 

Stork lb 4 1 

Heim rf 

Good cf 3 

B'baugh2b 10 3 10 

Hummel If 1 1 

Gillman c 2 14 2 

Beaver p 2 12 1 

Icus rf 10 

Myers If 10 



Totals 



4 4 11 30 4 



LEBANON VALLEY 

R. H. O. A. E. 
White cf 1 

Smith, 2b 2 2 3 1 

Nelson c 1 3 6 

Hummel, If 3 

Lyter, 3b 3 

Lehman, lb o 3 12 1 

Carmany, ss 1 2 

Little, p 10 

Harnish, rf 10 10 

Totals 4 6 12 30 4 

Gettysburg 000010201 0-4 
L. V. 00 3 1 000 -4 

Strike outs Beaver 11, Little 10, 2 
Base hits, Nelson. Time 2 hours. 
Umpire HOLTZWORTH. 



aCebanon QSalley 
College 



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Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
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Have Your Printing Done by 

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Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
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COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, April 18, 1911 fio, 28 

Kiitcrcd as second-class matter November 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 8, 1879. 



Delaware 5-L V. 5 



Lebanon Valley played its third 
game of the season with the strong 
Delaware State collcga team at 
Newark, Delaware, last Tuesday. 
This was the second tie game. The 
weather was ideal for baseball and put 
spirit into both teams, however, our 
boys after their long ride were a little 
nervous when the game started. 

Carmony and Hummel through a mis- 
understanding allowed a fly ball which 
could easily have been fielded by either, 
to drop between them. This coupled 
with two errors and a scratch hit gave 
Delaware three of their five runs, in 
the first inning. No runs were 
scored on either side in the second 
inning, Delaware's fourth run came 
in the third inning on a passed ball 
by Nelson. In the fourth inning 
Delaware scored its fifth and last run 
on an ugly grounder to Carmony 
which could only have been fielded 
with great difficulty. 

As the game progressed our boys 
regained their nerve and put all their 
force into the last inning. Captain 
Harnish opened the game in the fifth 
inning with a pretty single to right 
field. Hummel followed with a two 
bagger. Errors on the part of Dela- 
ware and good base running on ours 
brought in five runs before the game 
was brought to an end by a double 
plav on Smith's fly to second. 

The game was called at 4 :io to 
allow our team to catch the train. 
We feel quite confident that Lebanon 
Valley would have come back with a 
victory instead of a tie could she have 
had the full nine innings in which to 
play. Little pitched a good game and 
Nelson did some good work behind the 
bat. 

(Continued On page 2) 



L V. vs. ALBRIGHT 

Will Play on the Diamond at Annville, 
Saturday, April 22 

The first home game of the season 
will be played next Saturday at 3 p. 
m. with the strong Albright college 
team on the home field. This game, 
with out question, will be one of the 
most interesting and exciting of the 
season, for Albright is one of L. V.'s 
old rivals in this sport. 

L. V. has been making a good 
showing in the first three games of 
the season and it is hoped that this 
good showing will keep up until the 
end. Let this game be no tie, but a 
victory for Lebanon Valley. Two 
ties in one season and those coming in 
succession should Le sufficient. 

Every fellow should be out for prac- 
tice each evening and lend a helping 
hand to develop a strong team for 
this game. The manager and captain 
are putting forth all efforts to get the 
team in condition and if every person 
will co-operate with them we feel con- 
fident that Saturday's game will be a 
success. 

On Satruday afternoon may each 
co'ed sing, "Take me out to the ball 
game. " 

Commencement Orator 

The senior class takes this oppor- 
tunity to announce that the orator for 
the coming commencement exercises 
willjbe the Honorable Franklin Spencer 
Edmonds, of Philadelphia. Mr. 
Edmonds is one of the most prominent 
lawyers of the Philadelphia Bar, and 
is a finished orator. He is strongly 
connected with the largest movements 
for the improvement of civic con- 
ditions in Philadelphia. Mr. Edmonds 
comes very highly recommended and 
the class takes great pleasure in 
making this announcement. 



Calendar. 



Monday, 8 :45— Easter vacation ends. 
^Tuesday, 7 p. m.— Prayer meetings 

Wednesday, 7:30 p. m. —Mathema- 
tical Round Table at home of Prof. Leh- 
man. 

Thursday, 7:45 p. m. — "Snow, 
bound" "Pirates of Penzance." 

Friday, 8 p. ra., Illustrated Lecture 
by Dr. Johnson; Philo..—6 :30 p. m. 



Biological Field Club 

Anniversary 

The Biological Field club will cele- 
brate its anniversary Friday April 21, 
at 8 p. m. Dr. Duncan S. Johnson, 
professor of Botany in Johns Hopkins 
University, will deliver an illustrated 
lecture on "The Plant Life of a Tro- 
pical Island." The lecture will be 
illustrated by lantern slides made 
largely from photographs taken by Dr. 
Johnson while conducting research work 
in Jamaica. This lecture will with- 
out doubt be a great treat for all. It 
will be held at 8 p. m. in Engle Con- 
servatory after which the club will give 
an informal reception. 



Sr. -Junior Council Election 

The election of the members of the 
new Sr.— Jr. Council has just been 
completed. The Senior members 
elect are Messrs. O. T. Ehrhart, Artus 
O. Kauffman, S. G. Ziegler, Win. C\ 
Ellis and J. K. Lehman. 

The Junior members elect are 
Messrs. S. 0. Grimm, Oliver Butter- 
wick, Guy Wingerd, and Arthur S. 
Beckley. 

The new council will be organized 
in a few days and will be prepared to 
take hold of student government so 
long neglected, during which time 
everybody did as they pleased and the 
identity of classes was entirely lost. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College Jiecus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

SAMUEL. O. GRIMM, '12 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

CLAIR F. HARNISH, '12 
JOHN W. ISCHY, '12 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '12 
EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 
AMQs H. WEIGLE, '13 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
W. A. Brunner, 11, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of lea, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to W. A. Brunner, Box 916, all other 
matter to Room 19, Administration 
Building Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

With this issue the new staff of edi- 
tors assumes charge of the production 
of this paper. A glance above will 
give the personnel of the staff. The 
time of the year has come when 
Seniors are exceedingly busy for theses 
must be written and preparation must 
be under way for the on coming com- 
mencement day. To give the Senior 
•members of the old staff an oppor- 
tunity to finish their work in good 
time, they have been granted perma- 
nent leave of absence and the new 
staff selected a little earlier than 
formerly. While we are not hunting 
any more work than seems to be neces- 
sary at this time of year when spring- 
fever is in season and when tempta- 
tions to go along the line of least resi- 
stance are around us, we heartily ap- 
prove of the departure, and which 
doubtless is much appreciated by those 
whose college days are rapidly drawing 
to a close. 

The work of the ex-staff has been 
so good, that we timidly undertake to 
continue their work. We hesitate 
because we feel that it is going to cost 
us our best efforts to keep the paper 
up to the standard set -by our pre- 
decessors. But we kindly ask of you, 
the readers of this publication, to be 
patient with us until we learn our new 
responsibilities and can adjust our- 



selves to the new places. We are green 
uron this job, and doubtless will make 
many mistakes, but your kind indul- 
gence, and helpful suggestions will 
assist us in taking up our new duties 
and in making of this paper a publica- 
tion commensurate with the works 
and the standards of our college. 

In this paper we endeavor not only 
to interest our own students in the 
many activities around the college, 
but particularly to keep in touch with 
the alumni, to keep them informed of 
the progress of their alma mater, and 
to keep alive in their minds *heir in- 
terests in its welfare, to interest the 
friends of our institution, and to assist 
our prospective students to decide 
for Lebanon Valley. 

We are ambitious to make this 
paper the best that it can possibly be 
made . To do this, we need your 
suggestions and help, and we shall 
always be ready to receive your aid. 
If you see a point in which we can 
make improvements do not hesitate 
to inform us. Come, help us to make 
this paper your ideal of a college pub- 
lication. 

Finally, we desire to thank those 
concerned in conferring upon us the 
honor and responsibilities of the task. 



L. V. 5-DELAWARE 5 

Continued from page 1 
LEBANON VALLEY. 



R. H. A. E. 



White cf 
Smith 2b 
Nelson c 
Harnish rf 
Hummel If 
Lyter 3b 
Lehman lb 
Carmony ss 
Little p 









1 1 











2 















Totals 5 2 15 4 2 
DEL. COLLEGE 

R. H. 0. A. E. 

Ward rf 1 

Dunn 2b 1 1112 1 

Marshall If 110 

Taylor 3b 110 1 

Hoch lb 1 10 1 

Harvey ss 10 12 

S'ance cf 

Huston c 4 1 

Jolls p 2 

Knopf p i) 



Two base hits, Hummel; Sacrifice 
hits Little 1, White 1; Bases cn ball 
off Little 1, Jolls 0; Struck out by 
Little 4, by Jolls 3 ; Double plays Dunn 
to Hoch. 

BASE BALL BINGLES 
Has anyone heard the team sing : 

"Blest bo the TIE that binds?" 
Nelson left for Bay City, Michigan, 

Wednesday. 

Did you notice the quintet in the 

fifth? 

Hummel is the team's Bean Brum- 
mel. 

Delaware seemed very willing to 
call the game at the ending of the fifth. 

Gettysburg's Umpire believes that 
"Charity begins at home." 
What did Delaware? A tie. 
White can run like an Indian. 
Lyter lit on his back at Gettysbrug 
but got his man. 

We've got the team 
We've got the team 

Gee Whiz. 
Come lend a hand 
To beat the band 
Get Biz. 



Alumni 



Totals 
Lebanon Valley 
Delaware College 



4 15 7 4 
5-5 
3 11 o-5 



Miss Edna D. Yeatts, '09, who has 
been teaching in York during the past 
winter is spending the spring term, 
teaching English in the Shippensburg 
Normal school. 

Mrs. Carrie Jeffries Eby, '87, of 
Newport, Pa., has lost both of her 
parents during the last year. 

Mr. George D. Owen, '05, of Leum- 
bill, Conn., has succeeded A. R. Clip- 
pinger as pastor of one of the churches 
there. 

Charles A. Fisher, '03, is pastor of 
a Presbyterian church, in Providence, 
Rhode Island. 

Professor M. M. Hoover, '06, Pro- 
fessor of English at Westfield college 
has been appointed assistant in English 
at Columbia University for the sum- 
mer session of 1911. Professor Hoover 
recently received the degree of Master 
of Arts from Columbia, the degree 
being conferred at the winter convoca- 
tion. 

W. C. Plummer, '10, is teaching in 
the High School at Beardstown, 111. 
To J. L. Appenzellar, '08, the 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Piano solo, Ethel Daugherty ; 
Reading Helen Weidler: Sketch, 
JS T aomi Ely, Evelyn Weidnian ; Rounds, 
Maud Kerchner, Ruth Engle, Lottie 
Spessard, Blanche Risser; Discussion 
—Resolved, that the Easter Rabbit 
lays eggs, Edith Lehman, Helen 
Brightbill; Vocal Duet, Anna Frye, 
Ruth E. Engle; "Fun", Society; 
Olive Branch, Editor. 

PHILOROSMIAN 

Inaugural Address, J. E. Marshall; 
Current Events, E. K. Boughter; 
Senator Lorimer, Titus Leibold ; De- 
bate: Resolved, That woman suffrage 
would better conditions in Penna. 

Affirmative, Paul Hummel, J. E. 
Marsnall; Negative, Jonn Curry, 
Oliver Butterwick; Mandolin Solo, L. 
L. Spessard; Why do we catch a cold? 
N. B. S. Thomas; Living Thoughts, 
Editor. Visitors welcome. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

(Continued from page 2) 
"News" is "a much welcome visitor 
especially now since L. V. is gaining 
some of its long lost prestage in ath- 
letics." 

H. H. Baish, '01, Supt. Schools. Al- 
toona, has renewed his subscription 
to the "News. " 

Eber E. Ludrick, of Shippensburg, 
a former student, now a member of 
the senior clas3 of State college, took 
a very prominent part, in "Chinatolc- 
gers" given by tne Thespians of State 
college in the Majestic Theatre, of 
Harrisburg on Tuesday night. 

Born to Dr. and Mrs. Rumberger, 
of Elizabethville, a son. Mrs. Rum 
berger was formerly Miss Laura Enders 
and was a student here for several 
years. 

Max Lehman. '07, spent his Easter 
holiday with his parents, Prof, and 
Mrs. Lehman. 



Mathematical Round Table 

Will render its monthly program 
Wednesday night, April 19, at Prof. 
Lehman's house on Main Street. The 
following is the program : On the 
Curriculum of Mathematics, Clair F. 
Harnish; Mathematics among The 
Ancient Greeks, Russel Weidler. 



Remember the Date — April 
20, 1911 

In order to create a fund to equip 
Engle Conservatory with window 
shades and make all other improve- 
ments necessary for a more pleasing 
auditorium for the presentation of 
plays and recitals, the Oratory and 
Music Departments will present a 
"double header" in said conservatory 
Thursday evening April 20, 1911. 

The "players" are practicing dili- 
gently for the event. 

Oratory will offer a pleasing little 
Comedy entitled "Snowbound," in 
which the peculiar incidents attached 
to a railroad wreck resulting in 
several parties being snowbound in a 
mountain hotel are presented very in- 
terestingly. 

The Musir Department is preparing 
to"present one act of the opera, "The 
Pirates of Penzance. " The rehearsals 
promise a very interesting production 
of a part of that deligthful opera so 
familiar to us all. 

These Departments deserve our sup- 
port in this vital matter. The need 
of certain improvements is apparent 
to all. The equipment which is to be 
procured will add very much to the 
aesthetic impressions of all future pro- 
ductions. 

Profs. Adams and Sheldon are 
positive that one of the mcst pleasing 
entertainments of the year will be 
given here Thursday evening, April 20, 
1911 at 8 o'clock. Admission 25 cents, 
reserved seats 10 cents extra. 



Items of Interest 

Frank Shearer, '13, accompanied 
the team to Newark, Delaware, Tues- 
day last. 

Messrs. Brunner, Loser and Lehman 
stopped over at Philadelphia Tuesday 
evening to "sit up with a friend." 

Geo. Mark Smith, formerly of L. 
V., now a student at State is spending 
a few days in town. 

The majority of the students were 
at their respective homss over Sunday 
eating Easter eggs. 

Miss Reba Lehman. Librarian of 
Hazelton, Pa., visited her parents 
over" Sunday. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
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W. R. Funk, Mgr. 
Dayton, Ohio 

STEPHEN HUBERT IS 

Book Binder 

320 Market St., HARRISBURG, PA. 

Magazines and College Books 
Rebound. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



L. A. Rodes, '14, visited York over 
Sunday for some reason or another. 

Clarence Schwalm [from Valley View, 
Pa., registered as a student in the Pre- 
paratory Department last week. 

C. C. Smith, '12. stopped off at 
Harrisburg Thursday en route to his 
home at Red Lion. 

Miss Naomi Ely' conservatory spent 
a few hours in our State capital Thurs- 
day afternoon before leaving for her 
home. 

Miss Mabel Jarvis, of Brooklyn, N. 
Y. was a guest of Prof. Adams over 
Easter. 

Profs. Dodge and Adams spent 
Saturday in Harrisburg. 

Messrs. Harnish, Grimm, Mulhollen, 
Richie, Charleton, Hayes, Kennedy, 
C. Reddick "kept house" over Easter. 

Messrs. Butterwick, Smith and 
Kreider autoed to Harrisburg Monday 
afternoon. 



Academy Banquet 

On Tuesday evening, April 11, the 
Academy entertained their baseball 
team in Hie house belonging to the 
United Brethren church, on the corner 
of Main Street and College Avenue. 

All of the rooms were tastily deco- 
rated in the Academy colors, red and 
black. Various games were played 
until about nine-thirty, when all were 
shown to the dining room where a large 
table was laid, also beautifully deco- 
rated with the colors. The following 
menu was served : Fruit salad, fried 
oysters, baked beans, sour cherries, 
bread and butter sandwiches, salted 
nuts ice cream, cakes. After the 
menu the loastmaster, Samuel Groh 
called the following toasts. "Our 
Base-ball Season," Prof. H. E. Spes- 
sard; "Our Girls," Harry Denlinger; 
"Our Boys," Helen Brightbill; "Our 
Base-ball Team," Sedic Rine. Th e 
baseball team has been doing excellent 
work this season and well deserved 
all the praise received in the toasts.. 

The happy evening ended appro- 
priately with the Academy yells. 

Bonfire 

Enthusiastic over the results of the 
game with Delaware some of the 
Preps, Freshmen, and Sophomores had 
a spectacular bon-fire on the campus 
Tuesday night. 



jCebanon Valley 
Colleffe 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

ZRcv. jCawrence Jfei'ster, ZPres. 
jfnnville, !Pa. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

The Journal PublishingCo. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Who made a home run ? No one. 
But you will if you select your Balls, 
Bats and Gloves From SPESSARD'S 
carefully selected stock of Baseball 
#oods. 

H. E. SPESSARD'S BOOKSTORE 



Journal Building 



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Capital 

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Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send (or a Catalegue. TROY, N.Y. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and CENTS 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes- 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

Full line of College Post Cards 
m| Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 

Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes- 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement Invitations 
Class Day Programs and 
Class Pins 



Dance Progrms 
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Invitations 
Menus 

Leather Dance 
Cases and 
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Fraternity 
and 

Class Inserts 
for Annuals 
Fraternity 
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Stationery 



Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 
WORKS— 17th STREET and LEHIGH 
AVENUE Philadelphia. 

Represented at L. V. C. by 
W. ALBERT BRUNNER 

Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account of 
8-hour law and extensive "wireless" develop- 
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Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu- 
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Nat'l Telegraph Institute 

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Engraving £o. 

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country. 



COLLEGE *fffiWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, April 25, 1911 



Ho. 29 



Entered as second-class matter November 13, 1910, at the post ofllce at Annvilie. Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



L. V. vs. York Tri-State 

THE TEAMS WILL PLAY A T YORK, 
TUESDAY, APRIL 25 

Lebanon Valley'' s fifth scheduled 
game will be played, providing the 
weather man will permit, this after- 
noon with York Tri-State at York. 
The boys are anxious for this game be- 
cause they were cheated out of playing 
a game last Saturdy with Albright, 
on account cf the wrong consignment 
of weather. 

The team left on the 11 :12 a. m. 
tram in the best of spirits and feeling 
that they will do themselves and the 
college credit in this game. The team 
has lost one game's experience which 
they needed badly, before going up 
against the strong York Tri-State 
team. 

BASE BALL BINGLES 
Made arrangements for everything 

but the weather Saturday. 

Old Jupiter P. must be a great 

enthusiast, wants to visit every game. 
Brunner's interested in sporting 

goods. 

We can't run a team without steam. 
Have you paid your athletic fee? 

Next stop, York. We're going to 
Tri-State. 

Is a rain coat a rain check? 

Same again; rain again; pain again. 
D— m again. 



Address by Mr. A. S. Kreider 

Mr. A. S. Kreider made a very in- 
teresting address on Friday evening at 
the banquet given by the Hershey 
Chocolate Co., in honor of the Trave- 
ler's Protecitve Association whk'h 
was holding a meeting there. Mr. 
Kreider's subject was : "The Travel- 
ling man from the point of view of the 
business man. " 



Anniversary 
Biological Field Club 

The Biological Field Club cele- 
brated its third anniversary Friday 
evening, 1 he 21th, Dr. Duncan S. John- 
son, of Johns Hopkins University was 
the speaker of the evening, lecturing 
on "The Plant Life of Jamacia." 
Dr. Johnson took his audience upon a 
trip to this tropical island delightfully 
explaining to them everything con- 
cerning the plant life of the island 
and frequently touching upon the in- 
habitants. His lecture wa3 splendidly 
illustrated by a large number of slides 
made from actual photographs taken 
upon a research expedition to Jamacia. 
To those interested in Biology his lec- 
turer was especially interesting from 
its scientific nature; to all others it 
was no less so because of the beautiful 
and natural pictures thrown upon the 
screen. 

After the lecture the Club gave an 
informal reception to the Mathema- 
tical Round Table in the Biological 
laboratory The laboratory has just 
been equipped with electric lights. 
After a social time refreshments were 
served. 



Prof. S. H. Derickson accompanied 
Prof. Johnson, Ph.D., of Johns Hop- 
kins, to Mt. Gretna Saturday. 



New York State Accepts Leb- 
anon Valley's Diploma 

Augustus S. Doming, first assistant 
Commissioner of Education of the state 
of New York, has authorized the ac- 
ceptance of the diploma, of Lebanon 
Valley College, Annvilie, Pa., in lieu 
of the preliminary iaw examination 
in that state. This means that the 
graduates of Lebanon Valley will be 
admitted to registration as law stu- 
dents in the state of New York with- 
out examination. During the deanship 
of Prof. Shenk, Lebanon Valley's dip- 
loma has been accepted in both the 
states of New York and Pennsylvania. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, L. V. vs. York Tri-State 
at York. Tuesady evening 7 p. m. 
prayer meeting. 

Thursday evening 7 -A5— Annual Ora- 
torical Contest Engle Conservatory of 
Music. 

Friday 7:15 societies. 

Saturday, L. V. vs. Millersville 
Normal at Millersville. 



Oratorical Contest 

Eight contesting colleges Swath- 
more, Grove City, Rutgers, Susque- 
hanna University, Grove City, Geneva, 
Albright and Lebanon Valley. 

Thursday evening, April 27, 1911, 
the annual inter-collegiate oratorical 
contest of the State Prohibition League 
will be rendered in Engle conserva- 
tory. The local league is arranging 
for the reception and entertainment of 
the orators and delegates. A conven- 
tion will be held Friday morning April 
28, in the conservatory at which the 
business incident to the state contest, 
and assembly will be transacted. 

The local league feels proud in being 
able to offer the contest to the patrons 
and friends, as well as students, of 
Lebanon Valley college as a pleasing 
and profitable number of this year's 
attractions. The orators who will 
compete are either the winners of 
local contests, or the elected represen- 
tatives of the respective colleges, 
which means that each institution is 
sending its best orator. 

The winner of this contest will 
speak at an interstate As&ambJy to be 
held before the close of the scholastic 
year, when all the state prize orators 
will compete. The prizes for our 
state contest will be as follows: $50 
for the best and $10 for the next best 
oration, judged according to both com- 
position rnd delivery. 

(Continued on page 2) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College flerjus 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, '12 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
CLAIR F. HARNISH, '12 
JOHN W. ISCHY, '12 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 

ivan \j. ressler, '12 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 
AMOS H. WF.IGL10, '13 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

Y. D. MULHOLLEN, '13, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 
OLIVER BUTTERWICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to V. D. Mulhollen, Box — , all 
other matter to Room 19, Adminis- 
tration Building- Lebanon Yalley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

In all human affairs some thing 
are bound to go wrong at some time 
or other, no matter what we do to the 
contrary. Such ha3 been our experience 
during this year when more than the 
usual number of things' seemed to be 
on the toboggan slide-way. Wherever 
men are associated together differences 
of opinion are bound to arise. Opi- 
nions upon any definite subject fare a 
decided necessity for any one in- 
terested in that subject. But opinions 
that are unchangeable and cannot be 
modified to meet changing conditions 
may become a stumbling block in the 
way of progress. We have been the 
recipients of more than our desired 
share of such differences, and have 
been caused no little inconvenience 
and discomfort as a result. But we 
feel now that past disagreements have 
been adjusted finally and that the new 
will soon be in evidence. 

During the past week the new 
council composed of Seniors and Juniors 
has been re-organized and is in a posi- 
tion to resume the duties of student 
government so abruptly discontinued 
by the ex-Council last October. Since 
that time there has been no organized 
system of government outside of the 
class room and the characterciV.ic con- 
ditions of such a state of affairs were 
at hand. Everjone was governed by 
his own inclinations no matter whether 



his inclinations were decide By out of 
harmony with his surroundings or not. 
Under such conditions nuisances and 
discomforts cannot help but arise. 
We have had our share. 

The traditions of the college have 
suffered untold injury by the greater 
part of a college year of laxity and 
disregard of the experiences of the 
past. It cannot be hoped that the 
Council could in many way restore those 
traditions that make college life so 
pleasant and different from any other 
in the short time that is left before 
the close of this college year in June. 

Those things will require a gradual 
course of rebuilding. But the Council 
can do much to prepare the way for 
the work of the coming college year. 
The work that they succeed in doing 
before the close of this year will b e 
the foundations upon which the work 
of next year will have to be built. 
The better the work done this spring, 
the better will be the beginning of the 
same next fall. 

The whole college has suffered from 
existing conditions. As closely as we 
can observe there is no real college 
spirit to be found among our students. 
This is an indifference resulting from 
the genera] down ward trend. Athletic 
managers can persuade no one to 
assist in the little work that needs be 
donehere. Whose fault is it? Under- 
claspmen can hardly be blamed for 
telling you to go to, when they are 
allowed to feel that they are just as 
important as anyone around the col- 
lege, indifference has been our right 
hand man long enough. We hope for 
better things. 

A visit to the Boy's dormitory will 
show that during the first week the com- 
mittee of the council, known as the 
Dormitory committee, has done some 
splendid work. May the good work 
continue until the said buildings will 
be kept clean and sanitary as it ought 
to be for human habitation. 

Much is to be expected from the 
Council, but they cannot work alcne. 
They must have the assistance of every 
one to make their work most pleasant 
and effective. It is to be hoped that 
such help will not be wanting, so 
that the remandier of this year shall 
be more pleasant than before and so 
that the new year may not open over 
shadowed by a cloud. 



Oratorical] Contest 

Continued from page 1 

The league expects a full turn out 
of the student body to support the 
speaker for L. V., who won the con- 
test la3t year. Mere than this, the 
contest will offei a splendid side issue 
to a sociological study as each 
speaker will present some economic or 
social aspect of the liquor traffic. 

The price of admission is 25 cent? 
which includes reserved seats that can 
be secured at Spessard's Bookstore. 

The league notices that Hon. Oliver 
W. Sternat, of Chicago, sole prohibi- 
tion member of the Illinois legislature, 
an orator of exceptional ability, will 
speak in St. Marks Remormed Church, 
Lebanon, at 8 p. m. Friday, and re- 
commends that anyor.e interested in 
this phase of social reform hear Mr. 
Sternat. Admission is free. 

The "Benefit Entertainment" 

The "Benefit Entprtainment" pro- 
gram: A Scene from "The Pirates of 
Penzance," by Sullivan; Cast, Mabel, 
Miss Edith Gingrich; Edith, Miss 
Lottie Spessa-rd; Kate, Miss Helen 
Brightbill; Isabel, Miss Evelyn Weid- 
man ; Frederic, Mr. Lester Spessard ; 
Chorus— Misses Christeson, K. Bach- 
man, Ely, Mozer, Lehman, Kershner, 
Spayd, Schell, Behney, Meyer, B. 
Spessard, Smith; Accompanist, Miss 
Meda Diehm ; Comedy — "Snow- 
bound," characters. Mrs. Romaine, 
Nona Downey Hockenbury ; Kathleen 
Romaine, her daugher, Florence 
Christeson; Gordon Marlowe, Amos H. 
Weigle; Waiter, Lester A. Rodes. 
The above program was presented at 
the Engle Audtorium last Thursday 
evening. The hall wa3 comfortably 
filled with a audience that manifested 
their apperciation of the excellence of 
the performances. 

In "The Pirates of Penzance," the 
girls, each one carrying a white para- 
sol, made a very pretty appearance in- 
deed. And they very soon demonstra- 
ted that when it comes to singing they 
could make good, as well. The 
"Operetta" was thoroughly enjoyed by 
all, and everyone was sorry when it 
came to an end. 

"Snowbound" was fully up to the 
high standard of work which the ora- 
tory denartment usually presents. The 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Albright vs. L. V. 

No Game Rain) 

Mathematical Round Table 

Prof. Lehman very delightfully en- 
tertained the Mathematical Round 
Table at his home on East Main Street, 
last Wednesday evening. 

A short interesting program was 
rendered consisting cf a carefully pre- 
pared paper on the "Curriculum of 
Mathematics" by Mr. Clair Harnish, 
Also a paper throwing light upon 
"Mathematics among the Ancient 
Greeks" by Russel Weidler. 

After the program was rendered, 
several mathematical games were 
played which afforded much amuse- 
ment. Elegant refreshments were 
served. 



Sr.-Jr. Council 

The Sr.-Jr. Council has been re- 
organized. 0. T. Ehrhart was elected 
President and Guy Wingerd was elec- 
ted secretary. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Sunday afternoon Y. M. C. A. was 
led by G. A. Richie. He took for his 
subject, The Past, Present and Future 
and read for a scripture lesson He- 
brews 9:22-28. He distributed a num- 
ber of slips containing topics appro- 
priate to the subject. The topics 
were well discussed and added to the 
interest of the meeting. After the 
discussijn of the topics the leader 
made a few closing remarks. 

The attendance was poor, probably 
due to the cold atmosphere of (he nail. 
The deficiency in attendance should b e 
overcome, for this meeting could be 
made one of the most interesting of 
the Sunday services around the school. 
Each member should make himself 
responsible for the presence of some 
other man who does not attend, and in 
this way a better attendance will be 
assured. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The stucly of the life of Alice Free- 
man Palmer was taken up again for 
our meeting. Her life as a student 
at Michigan Unversty, as a school 
teacher at different places, and as 
president of Wellesey was carefully 
discussed by the leader, Katharine 
Moser. The meeting in every respect 
proved very interesting and helpful. 



JZebanon Valley 
Colleffe 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facililie- in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
slant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

ffiev. jCawrence Jfeister, ZPres. 
Jtnnville, iPa. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

The Journal Publishing Co. 

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Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

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Bats and Cloves From SPESSARD'S 
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COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, JVTay 2, 1911 



flo. 30 



Entered as .second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Base Ball 



L. V. vs. DELAWARE 



Calendar. 



YORK TRI-STATE 

On Tuesday the college team 
journeyed to York where they played 
the Tri State team of that place. The 
game was well played, although 
marred by several errors on the part 
of Lebanon Valley, which cost most of 
the runs. Little was in fine form 
holding York down to nine hits. Smith 
played a great game at second. E. 
Miller played a sensational game in 
the field and at bat, having three 
bingles, one of them a two bagger to 
his credit. The game ended 12—4 in 
favor of York. The score : 

YORK 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Abbott cf 1110 

Zible 3b 12 10 

Strait If 3 110 

Wagner 2b 2 4 2 3 

Kauffman lb 2 1 11 

Stump ss 2 2 2 3 

Umlauf rf 110 

Duff c 18 10 

Howe c 2 

€u!p p 1 

Bentley p 

Smith p 2 



Totals 


12 18 


27 11 





LEBANON 


VALLEY. 








R. 


H. 


O 


A. 


E. 


O. Miller e 





1 


7 


1 





Hummel If 


1 








1 





E. Miller cf 


1 


2 


1 








Loser cf 


1 


1 











C. Smith 2b 


1 


1 


1 


4 





Harnish rf 








1 








Lehman lb 








12 


4 





Lyter 3b 





1 





1 


1 


Carmany ss 








1 


5 


3 


Little p 








1 


6 





Totals 


4 


6 


24 


22 


4 



York 1 5 1 5 0-12 

Lebanon Valley 3 1—4 
Home run, Wagner. Three base 
hit— Strait two base hits— Stump, E. 
Miller; Sacrifice — Stump, Unlauf, 
Duff, C. Smith, Harnish Struck— by 
{( kmtinued on pa<je 2) 



Will Play on the Diamond at Annville 
on Friday, May 5 

If the weather man will permit, L. 
V. will play its first home game with 
the strong Delaware state college 
team next Friday at 2 :45 p. m. on the 
home field. This game, without 
doubt, will be a very interesting one, 
for the boys played them to a tie on 
their field at Newark, Delaware. 

The boys have been making credit- 
able scores on all tneir trips and there 
is no reason why they will not do the 
same on their home field. It is hoped 
that this game will be no tie but a 
victory for Lebanon Valley. Let 
each student do all that he can to 
encourage the team in their practice 
for this coming game. Ihey need 
your support. If the right spirit is 
manifested a victory will be assured. 

May each loyal student and friend 
come out to the game on Friday and 
give the boys the best of your ' ' roots. ' ' 



Y. M. C. A. 

The Y. M. C. A. held its Sunday 
afternoon service on the campus instead 
of in their hall on account of the 
beautiful outdoor conditions. Titus 
Leibold, the leader, read from Phili- 
pians 3:1—15 and based his talk on the 
"Consciousness of Unattainment. " 

He showed the practical and per- 
sonal import to college students of 
having their ideals in God. Aim high 
so that if you come a little low of 
your mark you will still be high. 
Also it is not a sin to fail, it is a sin 
not to profit by one's failure. 

The attendance was good and this 
added to the pleasant afternoon made 
the meeting a very interesting one. 

Several of the men present gave 
short talks which were full of good 
thoughts and inspiration. 



Tuesday, 6 p m.— Prayer Meeting. 

Thursday, 7:45 p. m.— Senior recital, 
Mae Meyer. 

Friday, 8 p. m. — Philokosmian Liter- 
ary Society Anniversary 2 :45 p.m. Base 
ball Lebanon Valley vs. Delaware. 

Sunday 1 p. m.— joint session of Y. 
M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 



Prohibition Contest 

The state intercollegiate Prohibition 
oratorical contest was held Thursday 
evening in the chapel. Eight colleges 
took part in the contest. The first 
prize of $50 was won by Gettysburg 
and the second prize of $10 by Grove 
City. All the speakers did very well 
and their orations showed thought and 
hard work. After the contest the club 
gave an informal reception for the 
orators an<l visitors. 

The colleges represented and the 
speakers were as follows, Susquehanna, 
Samuel J. Games; Gettysburg, Frank 
Snyder; Juniata, William Judy; Al- 
bright, Roy M. Smith; Geneva, M. C. 
Mitchell; Grove City, J. C. McConnell; 
Lebanon Valley, Amos Weigle; 
Rutgers, Allen Campbell. 

The judges of the contest were Rev. 
Fluck of Myerstown, J. C. Williams, 
of the State Department of Forrestry 
and Dr. J. L. Lemberger, of Lebanon. 




Miss Emma Loos, '01, of Bern visited 
her sister in Annville last week. 

Rev. E. O. Burtner, '90, Palmyra on 
Sunday morning and Rev. S. E. Rupp, 
'01, Lebanon, Sunday evening filled the 
pulpit in the local U. B. church. 

Miss Dodge left for Massachusetts 
Thursday on account of the illness of 
her aunt. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fierjus 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
SAMUEL O. GRIMM, '12 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

CLAIR F. HARNISH, '12 
JOHN W. ISCHY, '12 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '12 
EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 
AMOS H. WEIGLE, '13 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

V. D. MULHOLLEN, '13, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

OLIVER BUTTER WICK '12 
PAUL LOSER, '13 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to V. D. MULHOLLEN, Box — , all 
other matter to Room 19, Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

The Spring with garlands in her 
hands, 

Came tripping into town, 
But shuddered at the stony streets, 

And houses gray and brown. 
"Between these barren walls," 
she said, 

"I could not live an hour," 
And fled away, but as she went 

She dropped a tiny flower. 
It found upon the cobblestones 

A patch of shallow mold, 
And there to every passer-by 

Its tale of beauty told; 
To palid toilers, bent and tired, 

It spoke of grassy nooks, 
The dewy pink of apple-trees, 

The silver of the brooks. 
A girl remembering purer things 

Went home that very night; 
A boy upon the downward path 

Received its message bright; 
A man next morning bought a cot 

His little broad to rear 
Where roses twined about the door, 

And woods and fields were near 
A ray of golden sunshine sant 

To light the city gloom, 
A missionary from a land 

Of glorv and perfume, 
Lo! when it withered on the stem. 

It left bphind the seeds 
Of good in many a callous soul, 

To bloom in better deeds. 
There are not many human beings 
that arenot responsive to the beauties 
of a flower. Its purity suggests pure 
thots, its modesty and fragrance sug- 
gest service to others and its beauty 
and perfection suggest thots of God. 



To us, who have the green fields and 
the trees, and best of all, the flowers 
all about us, these things lose much of 
their significance, and we pass bye 
many a flower of greatest beauty be- 
cause, forsooth, there are thousands 
of others just like it. But it makes 
our heart ache to think that there are 
multitudes of children and even men 
and women in certain districts of cer- 
tain cities who have never seen the 
commonest flower. There are poor, 
pain-racked mortals who will be tossing 
on a hospital bed all this summer, 
without a friend to cheer them, per- 
haps, nothing to break the monotony 
of the days and nights of suffering, 
nothing to hope for, but death. What 
a blessing to such a .one would be a 
tiny bunch of our most common flowers. 

There are banks of violets, each one 
of which might be a blessing, but 
which we all pass by; there are moun- 
tains covered with arbutus each blos- 
som longing in its heart to make some 
life brighter, but doomed to die un- 
noticed; a little later there will be 
groves of laurel blossoms, fields of 
daisies and wild roses, and then the 
wild aster and goldenrod. How easy 
would it be for you an ] me, not only 
to bring sunshine and joy and cheer 
into darkened and discouraged lines, 
but at thesame time bring tiiem the 
message of God's love and care for 
them, by merely putting forth the 
effort to pick a few flowers and 
passing them on to those who would 
consider them a blessing. 

Now let us briefly sum up the situa- 
tion : There are in the city, both in 
the slums and in the hospitals, thou- 
sands of our fellow human beings to 
whom a tiny flower would be a god- 
send, there are other men and women 
in the cities who are sacrificing 
their lives to make these unfortunate 
ones more happy ; there are fields of 
wild flowers that droop and die un- 
noticed; there are students at Lebanon 
Valley College who will be in the 
country this summer where these 
wild flowera are in bloom; and there 
are express companies that will 
carry the flowers almost for nothing, 
in some cases absolutely free of 
charge. 

Perhaps you will say these are only 
simple wild flowers and the men and 
women in the city could see no beauty 



in them. Perhaps the men and women 
who live on the boulevard in a brown 
stone mansion would not appreciat e 
them. But you must remember that 
their esthetic taste ha3 been trained 
only to see beauty in anything that 
has the tint of gold on it. Or per- 
haps you will say, the very poor do 
not care for the beautiful. Does not 
the poorest family that you know of, 
take pride in the geranium in the old 
crrched teapot in their window? 
There are families in the city much 
poorer than the roorest family you 
know, but they have the same longing 
for the beautiful in their hearts. 

There will be" a wild flower club or- 
ganized at Lebanon Valley College be- 
fore commencement. The object of 
this club will be to gather some of 
those wild flowers of which nature has 
furnished such an abundance, and send 
them to the city where they may full- 
fl their mission by making brighter 
some unfortunate life. 

Will you join this club? 



^ Items of Interest J 

Lottie Spessard '12, and Esther 
Schell. '12 were delegates to the W. 
M. A. convention at Oberlin last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kottler spent a few 
days in town recently 

Miss Florence Christeson, '13. left 
Monday for an extended tour thru the 
New England states. 

Sam Grim, 12, is attending the 
convention of the college Y. M. C. A. 
Presidents at Meadville, Pa. 

Ivan Potter, '13, is spending the 
week at his home on Long Island. 

The following is quoted from a 
letter' written by Mr. J. W. Stager, 
Sup't transportation, P. and R. Rail- 
way Co. 

"I am obliged to you for a copy of 
the Lebanon Valley College Souvenir 
It shows an enterprising spirit in 
having a college that assists so largely 
in the honors coming to Lebanon 
Vfalley territory." 

Ressler, Plummer, Gruber, Saylor, 
Hensel and Prof. Warner accompanied 
the team to York Tuesday. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



The Philokosmion Literary Society 
of 

Lebanon J 'alley College 
requests the honor of your presence at its 
Fort) '-fo u rth A n n i versa ry 
Friday evening, May fifth 
nineteen hundred eleven 
at eight o'clock 
Fugle Conservatory 



Base Ball 



Continued from page 1 



Culp 2, by Bentley 4, by Smith 8, by 
Little, 5. Bases on Balls off Little 4. 
Double play C. Simth to Lehman to 
E. Miller . Umpire Geiser. 

MILLERSVILLE 

In a hottly contested game Millers- 
-ville defeated L. V. at Ihe former's 
place to the tune of 4—0. It was a 
pitchers battle throughout. Only 31 
men faced Little, while 27 men vainly 
clawed the air in order to hold up the 
honor of dear old Lebanon Valley. 
Little pitched a great game, having 
twelve strike outs to his credit. 
Carmanv played a good game £t short. 

The score by innings: 

First inning, Hummel struck out 
Smith struck out. Lyter struck, Burk 
struck out. Arthur out Carmanv to 
Lehman Snyder flew out to Carmany. 

Second inning. Harnish out Hull 
to Arthur. Lehman struck out Loser 
out Stroup to Arthur. 

Zeillinger struck out. Sharkey 
struck out, Skiles flew out to Carmany. 

Third inning. Carmany struck out, 
Lyter struck out, Little out Stroup 
-to Arthur. 

Stroup flew out to Hummel, Hull 
struck out Weller flew out to Smith. 

Fourth inning. Hummel flew out 
to Stroup, Smith struck out; Lyter flew 
out to Weller. 

Burke reached first on error, Arthur 
reached first on error, Bruke scored on 
Snyders out from Carmany to Lehman ; 



Zeillinger struck out. Sharkey out 
Hummel to Lyter. 

Fifth inning. Harnish flew out to 
Arthur, Lehman got a two bagger, 
caught at third ; Loser struck out. 

Burke out Carmany to Lehman, 
Skiles got single scored in Stroups 
single. Hull flew out to Lehman; 
Weller struck out. 

Sixth inning. Carmany flew out 
to Skile, Lyter "flew out to Arthur, 
Little struck out. 

Arthur struck cut, Snyder out Lyter 
to Lehman, Zeillinger struck out. 

Seventh inning. Hummel flew out 
to Burke, Smith struck out Lyter 
struck out. 

Sharkey struck out, Skiles got a hit 
scored on Stroups out and Hulls hit, 
Weller flew out to Carmany. 

Eighth inning. Harnish got a 
single, caught stealing second, Leh- 
man flew out to Zeillinger, Loser 
struck out. 

Burke struck out Arthur got a two 
bagger, Snyder out Carmany to 
Lehman, Burke scored on Zeillingers 
single Sharkey struck out. 

Ninth inning Carmany, T Lyter and 
Little struck out. 

MILLERSVILLE 

R. H. O. A. E 
Burke 3b 2 2 

Arthur lb 14 

Snyder If 10 

Zei linger rf 1 

Sharkey cf 2 2 

Skiles ss 110 

Stroup 2b 3 2 

Hall c 16 2 

Weller p 2 



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Magazines and College Books 
Rebound. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



LEBANON VALLEY 

R. H. O. A. E. 
Hummel, If 10 

Smith, 2b 110 

J, Lyter, 3b 3 

Harnish, rf 110 1 

Lehman, lb 17 1 

Loser cf 

Carmany, ss 3 2 

T, Lyter c 11 1 

Little, p 1 

Totals 2 24 8 2 

Millersville 1 1 1 1 x-4 

Lebanon Valley 000000000 -0 
BASE BALL BINGLES 

Couldn't get Wagner's "Horner" 
with a "Trot." 

Was the game at York fair because 
it was palyed on Fair grounds? 

We earned our runs at York anyhow. 

Smith squirms around second in 
"eely" fashion. Don'tshout! Millers 
did. Is it base to bawl? 

The pitchers had good handles in 
Saturday's game. 

Lehman had the "longest" hit lor 
L. V. 

If the science of baseball continues 
to grow, a nine will become a six. 
Won't need fielders. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Tn a very informal outdoor meeting 
on Sunday afternoon, the Y. W. C. A. 
continued the study of the life of Alice 
Freeman Palmer. Miss Clara Horn 
led the meeting and brought out the 
leading facts concerning Miss Free- 
man's life as president of Wellesley 
college. She held this position for a 
period of six years, meeting with 
marked success in bringing about im- 
provements in the college and exerting 
a tremendous personal influence upon 
the students. 

The meeting proved interesting and 
helpful to all present. 

Annonncement 

On Monday evening May 8. Profes- 
sor Shenk will lecture for the benefit 
of the United Brethren church on the 
subject "Thou Art the Man." The 
lecture is given under the auspice of 
the young Men's class of the local Sun- 
day School. 

Guy Wingerd, '12, accompanied the 
team to Millersville Saturday. 

C. C. Smith and Guy Wingerd stop- 
ped off at Lancaster over Sunday. 

Correspondent hasn't found out 
why? 



jCebanon Uailey 
Colleffe 



First Class Faculiy. 
Group System, 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
Z/tev. jCawrence Jfet'ster, ZPres. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

The Journal PublishingCo. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa, 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Who made a home run ? No one. 
But you will if you select your Balls, 
Bats and Cloves From SPESSARD'S 
carefully selected stock of Baseball 
goods. 

H. E. SPESSARD'S BOOKSTORE 



Journal Building 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



flnwilk national Bank 



Capital - - $100,000.00 
Surplus and Undi- 
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Deposits - - 400,000.00 
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%, SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Fadcliffc Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprietor 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

CFull line of College Post Cards 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets.. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes. 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement Invitations 
Class Day Programs and 
Class Pins 



Dance Progrms 
and 

Invitations 
Menus 

Leather Dane- 
Cases and 
Covers 




Fraternity 
and 

Class Inserts 
for Annuals 
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and Class 
Stationery 



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WORKS— 17th STREET and LEHIGH 
AVENUE Philadelphia. 

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and Supplies 

Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

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Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account of 
s-hour law ami extensive "wireless" develop- 
ments. We operate under direct supervision on 
Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu- 
dents, when qualified. Write for catalogue. 

NatM Telegraph Institute 

Cincinnati, Philadelphia. Memphis. Davenport 
la., Columbia, 8. ('., Portland, Ore. 



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6n0raviM9 0o. 



#T The largest specialists in 
^-•College Engravings in the 
country. 



PHILOKOSMIAN ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 

COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, May 9, 1911 fio. 31 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Forty-Fourth Anniversary 

Philokosmian Literary Society 



The Forty-fourth Anniverasry exer- 
cises of the Philokosmian Literary So- 
ciety were rendered in Engle Hall Fri- 
day evening May 5, 1911. One of the 
largest, audiences ever present at a 
function of this nature at Lebanon Val- 
ley College assembled in the conserva- 
tory, where Keim's Orchestra was pre- 
luding the program of the evening. 
Every seat was taken and many were 
compelled to take r laces upon the gal- 
lery. There v.ere present at least 450 
people. 

The Hall was tastefully decorated 
in old gold and blue, the colors of the 
society and the rostrum was decked 
with many palms and ferns. 

The participants in the program were 
conducted to their seats on the stage, 
after which the invocation was given 




1'. R. KO( >NTZ Ml 
President's Address 



by Rev. H. B. Spayd, Col'ege pastor 
and ex-member of Philo. After an 
overture by the orchestra, the first 
speaker of the evening, delivered his 
address. The applause of the audience 
as well as its profund stillness and 
attention gave ample testimony that 
the speakers and soloist were 
maintaining the standard for which 
the Philokosmian Literary Society has 
ever stood, 'ihe poise, abandon and 
delivery of the cratots displayed an 
improvement overall rendilicns of the 
past. 

The president's address by P. P. 
Koontz, '11, was brief, pointed and 
inspirational, emphasizing the prime 
functions of a literary society. 

Earl A. Spesasrd, '11, sang 'cwo 
s n los in his usual pleasing manner. 
"Jean" by Burleigh and "Silent 
Night" compesedby Max F. Lehman, 
'07, ex-member of_the society. 

The orations of W. A. Brunner, '11, 
0. T. Ehrhart, '11, W. C. Shoop, '11 
follow and are self explanatory 
in respect to their thought and com- 
position. We may add, however, that 
L. L. Spessard made a happy selection 
when he chose Riley's "Knee-deep 
in June" for a reading. 

The last and best solo of the evening 
was sung by E. A. Spessard. For 
this number he selected Rotali's "Mia 
Sposa La Mia Badnera." After the pro- 
gram was rendered the members and 
friends of the society were tendered a 
reception in Philo Hall, where re- 
freshments were served a* a seaonable 




E. A. SPESSARD '11 
Soloist 



hour. The program follows : 

Orchestra, Selected; Invocation, 
Rev. H. B. Spayd; President's Ad- 
dress, P. R Koontz; Vocal Solo. E. A. 
Sressard, ( a )Jean, Burleigh, (b) Silent 
Night, M. F. Lehman; Oration, W. 
A. Brunner, "Ye Honest People"; 
Reading, L. L. Spessard, "Knee-deep 
in June" James Whitcomb Riley; 
Oration, O. T. Ehrhart, "To Higher 
Things"; Vocal Solo, E. A. Spessard, 
"Mia Sposa Sara La Mia Badnera," 
Aug. Rolali; Oration, W. C. Shoop, 
"Civic Righteousness"; Orchestra, 
Selected. 



President's Address 

Ladies and Gentlemen : It is with 
the greatest pleasure that we welcome 



COLLEGE NEWS 



you to these, the forty-fourth Anniver- 
sary exercises of the Philokosmian 
Literary Society. With great antici- 
pation do we look forward to this 
annual occabion as the time set apart 
to do honor to the organ'zation which 
we love next to our College itself. 
Your presence at the Anniversary 
exercises is not only a proof of your 
interest in us, but also a stimulus to 
continue firmly in the cultivation of 
the principles for which the Philokos- 
mian Literary Society stands. 

The main objects, for the realization 
of which we meet from week to week, 
are three in numbfr : our own mutual 
improvement, the cultivation of musi- 
cal and literary talent, and the promo- 
tion of moral and social activity. It 
is a good thing that in tne present 
age a college education is in the reach 
of practically all who desire it; but 
it is a better thing that, in the smaller 
colleges at least, the opportunities of a 
literary society are available to all 
who tak* 1 advantage of the college 
course. Then from the training of 
the literary society and the college 
comes the inculcation of the principles 
into the life of the student which form 
character. True, the college affords 
various courses of study for the 
development of the student, and in most 
cases, trfe-e«Hs realized. But what 
of all the pent up energy and force ac- 
quired from constant work in the class- 
room? What of the nervous strain 
from hard and steady work with the 
textbooks? The outsider may say, 
"Here is the place for college athletics 
or fraternities;" or he may name 
various modes of recreation to meet 
the demand. Yet with all that may 
be mentioned, there is something 
lacking. As to fraternities, they are 
too often impossible. And even tho 
many sports are enjoyed by different 
groups of students, and much as they 
are loved, nevertheless, most true col- 
lege men have an underlying need 
which no form of athletics can supply. 
This need, this making practical 
of the theoretical, this greater degree 
of freedom, as it were, may be found 
in the literary society. 

Each student meets questions in 
every-day life which must eventually 
be decided, but many hesitate to ex- 
press their views in the presence of 



superiors. Thus in the class-room, 
very often the opinion of the Professor 
is taken as final, while on the athletic 
field, the coach or captain assumes re- 
sponsibility. But who can come to 
the rescue in a literary society when 
equals face each other on common 
grounds; when the individual responsi- 
bility is more weighty; and when a 
lecision must be reached, based on 
the judgment of the student? How 
can a greater dependence on self be 
fostered than by the literary training 
of such an organization, where free- 
dom and expression of thought are 
nurtured, and where the aim is the 
encouragement of all that is manly? 

Too much emphasis cannot be laid 
on the necessity of procuring such 
development. 

I have already referred to the making 
practical of the theoretical as a need 
which is supplied by the literary 
society. Men tell us that we are 
training while in college to become 
leaders in after life, and, relying on 
their superior judgment, we look for- 
ward more or less to that end. It is 
very evident however that for the stu- 
dent of today to become the leader of 
tomortow, he must think and act 
quickly. A chief characteristic of 
the present era of American life is 
rapid thought and action on the part 
of those under responsibility. A mea- 
sure is thought out, approved, and 
carried into action in such an in- 
credibly short time that we pause, 
and wonder how it all happened. Do 
not understand me to say that a college 
course is entirely theoretical, for it is 
not. But in the pursuance of the 
average college curriculum, one meets 
a great many theories, some of which 
are valued as practical, while others 
are not. The college literary society 
affords the best opportunity for tho 
application ot these theories; for the 
transforming of them from mere 
theoretical dogma to practical truth 
of every-day life. It develops that 
coveted rapidity of keen thought which 
public speakers recognize everywhere 
as a most su2cessful and ready weapon 
against an adversary. 

Mention has also been made of 
greater freedom than that which is 
ordinarily obtained. In almost every 
college organization the powers higher 



than the student-body have some voic 
in the proceedings :— not so in the 
literary society. This is one of the 
few organizations where the students 
rule supreme; where they assume 
entire responsibility ; and where they 
are free to act they deem most advis- 
able and proper. The man who really 
has both college and society at heart 
will also hold such privileges as these 
in proper respect, rather than overstep 
their lawful bounds by taking undue 
advantage of them. 

As a society, we believe the princi- 
ples for which we stand tend to 
develop the highest standard of man- 
hood, and uphold a true sense of 
honor and efficiency which will count 
for much in after life. We also be- 
lieve that the continual striving to- 
ward the gcal which we have set will 
bring about the realization of the 
motto dear to every Philo heart, "Esse 
quam videri." 

Once more, in the name of the 
Philokosmian Literary Society, I bid 
you, one and all, a most hearty wel- 
come. 



Ye Honest People 

The long debate was over. The con- 
stitution was being signed by those 
men whose deliberations had brougt it 
into being. A man burdened with 
years, yet filled with the enthusiasm 
of youth— Benjamin Franklin, whose 
life long devotion to American liberty 
and American institutions had borne 
rich fruit in that convention hall- 
pointed to a painting behind the 
speakers chair and remarked to some 
of his friends, "Often and often 
during the course of these sessions 
have I looked at that (sun) behind the 
speakers chair without being able to 
tell whether it was rising or setting, 
but now at length I have the happiness 
to know that it is a rising sun." 
That vision was orophetic. It was a 
rising sun. 

Under the inspired leadership of 
those men upon whose shoulders the 
burden of responsibility for the success 
of the new government fell, that sun 
continued to rise. Sometimes, in the 
early dawn of the republic the mists 
of opposition obscured it from view. 
Clouds of discontent rising on every 
hand, threatened to deluge the land 
with fire and blood. As their shadows 



COLLEGE NEWS 



swept across the landscape, social 
mutterings End unrest from every 
quarter, like ominous thunder, smote 
the ears and chilled the hearts of the 
staunchest men. Still with souls 
unsullied, fearlessly they met their 
tasks, and the sun rose higher, 
piercing the rifts and warming to life 
our early national spirit. 

Time, from his immeasurable urn, 
has poured sweet balm upon the 
troubled hearts of the infant nation. 
The people sleep. Trie cares and toils 
that vexed their lives have passed into 
oblivion. Silent alike the voice of sanc- 
tion and derision. They aspired to 
serve. They brought their sacrifices, 
time, intellect and blood, and laid 
them on their country's altar, but as 
of old, some were without favor. The 
unerring hand of destiny chose what 
it would for warp and woof, and from 
the loom of years, the glorious fabric 
of our country 's history is snatched by 
those who claim to embody the spirit 
of our modern day. They flaunt its 
gorgeous hues before the eyes of men, 
they strive to hide its dark and sombre 
parts from view. 

Ea<m day, each hour, some new, 
some strange, fantastic doctrine of 
reform is launched into the political 
arena of our nation. However strange 
that doctrine is, however false its 
principle, however absurd the claims 
advanced in its behalf, its champion 
never fails to seek in the brief annal s 
of our Republic, some worthy prece- 
dent to give it weight and countenance. 
If this were done with equity and 
justice, and with a care that shows a 
vital knowledge of the case, all would 
be well. But, is this the course pur- 
sued by these reformers, these declared 
deciples of honest government, these 
bulwarks for the rights of man? 

Filled with the spirit of conceit they 
cite their precedents. From the acts of 
our great heroes they select what suits 
their purpose best, and ignoring the 
man, the age, the cause which drew 
him forth, they make their application, 
they boast of what our fathers did. 
To isolate a single act or group of 
acts, to sever all the tissues thai bound 
them— living— to the cause they loved, 
they served even to the icv jaws of 
death, is a crime against the sacred 
dust of our illustrious dead. Were 



this the measure of their deeds, I'd 
pause. 

But with itching hands they seize 
the most devoted servants of the land. 
They strive to mar the character, cir- 
cumscribe the worth, of those whose 
sense of honor, truth and wisdom, de- 
tects tne folly of their plans. With 
their perverted precedents they gain 
the credence of the public mind, they 
lead it where they will. Friends this is 
no idle dream. In future days students 
of history now unborn will pause to 
name our present chief the leader of his 
age, while those who moved with 
pomp amid the ringing shouts of the 
thoughtless crowd will be remembered 
because they scoffed, abjured, and 




W. A. BRUNNER »U 
First Orator 



hated him whose only master was his 
country, who dared to sacricfie self, 
hopes, and all, that the nation might 
in him be blessed. 

Is this a prophecy ? Let it be so. 
Charles Lee, Conway and their kind 
would long have been forgotten but 
that their cursed natures strove to 
vilify, defame, the most devoted 
servant of his day and cause. Our 
historic type of tenderness, love, devo- 
tion, did not escape the censure of the 
crowd. Even wearers of the 
sacerdotal robes, the so called feeders 
of the flock, painted him with horn 
and hoof. Deaths without number, 
crimes of every sort were imputed to 
his hand. His soul, assured that in 



the realization of his ideal reposed the 
destiny of his nation, bent to its task. 
Only removed from men, in close com- 
munion with his God did he complain. 
In the bosom of the Eternal he sought 
withjtears the love, the friendship which 
his fellow men denied. When at last 
the great heart of Lincoln, stilled by 
the assassin's bullet, was at peace, 
the people knew their folly. The in- 
fluence of his life will last as long as 
human breath. Character can never 
be destroyed. The lofty peak of 
mountain range is ever bathed in sun- 
shine however fierce the storms may 
rage around its slope, the noble 
character stands serene amid the 
basest persecutions. But, to see the 
sunlit peak, to gain the measure of an 
honest heart, demands an altutude 
that few attain, a height far above 
clouds or darkness, baseness or in- 
trigue. To reach this lofty eminence, 
where every effort gleams resplendent 
in the clear light of truth may cost a 
life of toil, it must be the aim of 
those who would elevate the race. 

But what relation does this bear to- 
ward our theme? Our land, our in- 
stitutions of government are passing 
thru a crisis. This alone does not 
distinguish the age for crises have 
been met and passed before and each 
new victory launched us on a fairer 
sea. Danger lurks in our collossal 
fortunes. Wealth, like a giant octo- 
pus has put forth its inky tentacles 
and grasped whate'rof worth it found. 
Its baleful presence is felt and known 
in our legislative halls, it has robbed 
them of their honor, self respect, and 
sense of rght. 

From north to south, from east to 
west, the nation has been stirred to 
its very soul. Dishonesty and fraud, 
unearthed, have been denounced 
on every hand. Our public servants, 
however faithful, have not escaped the 
scathing censure of the crowd, crazed 
by its passion for reform. iNew ideas, 
new methods, new rights, each pledged 
to remedy the fault, remove the 
stain, each supported by a group of 
ardent followers, have entered the lists 
to strive for honor in the nations eyes- 
Columbia turns frcm all and heeds 
them not, a nobler knight than these 
must win her trust. Not theory but 
tne intrinsic worth of any innovation 
must give it right to live. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Adams County, Ohio, has a story of 
its own, not in its vice, but in that 
its vice has been exposed. If the 
flaming brand of truth were flashed 
from shore to shore, until it 
would light the deepest recesses 
of each American voter's heart, 
revealing the motives, the aspira- 
tions of each, it would appall us all 
to see the ignorance, the vice, the 
civic crime, thus unveiled ; and yet 
from the floor of our national senate 
comes the cry, "The people are honest, 
their representatives ate corrupt." 
Shame on our voters if such a state 
exists. If this be true our form of 
government is doomed to fail. It is 
not true, honesty and corruption obtain 
in either class, cleanse the first, do 
not diminish or increase its powers or 
rank, and as sure as darkness flees 
from light, men of true worth will sit 
in the supreme councils of our land. 
The leader can accomplish nothing ex- 
cept those led consent. The people 
have the government they wish. The 
breath of summer moves the ripening 
grain, its force is felt to the field's 
remotest parts, so desire or dread, con- 
fidence or admiration, sweep through 
multitudes of men and shape the 
choice of each. Fill every heart with 
civic purity and pride, honest men 
will be in power, our nation's destiny 
will be secure. 

Grant the powers: of our delibera- 
tive assemblies to the mob, cast to the 
winds our system which approximates 
each citizen's desire, little will be 
gained, the last barrier of conservative 
progress will be swept away, and the 
government in the hands of honest peo- 
ple will be secure, yes secure, to be 
tossed about by every wind of fashion- 
able doctrine. One brief night sufficed 
to change the glad Hosannas to a fierce 
demand for crucifixion. Human 
nature is ever much the same. Blind 
strength can destroy a Bastile in 
a single day. Night-falls, charred 
ruins marks the place whore the 
mighty fortress stood, devastation en- 
throned among the dying embers gloats 
on a fallen empire. Blind strength 
can destroy, only brain directed forces 
can create. 

Time in his rapid flight has paused 
full oft to record ti e boasted prowess 
of our state. The achievements of 
our arms gleam brilliantly before the 



nations of the world, the splendor of 
our peaceful triumphs eclipse them all. 
Ev<?ry spot that ever dimmed the luster 
of our flag has been erased by blood. 
That flag has crossed the desert waste, 
the flood, and now, the symbol of 
liberty to all the earth, it stands en- 
trenched where the beaming light of 
every clime may kiss its streaming 
folds. Shall it be ever so or shall the 
sun of some future day gleam on this 
banner as the emblem of a special 
class that cannot see beyond the narrow 
confines of their own desires? 

Wealth without limit, poverty to 
the very verge of ruin will not suffice 
to mark the class of men in whom we 
should trust the destines of our empire, 
An honest heart should mark the 
man, an honest vote distinguish him 
from all the rest, 'lis not more 
power our voters need, but, the pride, 
the knowledge and the will, the self 
respect to use aright that which 
they have. In that is our only 
safety, our only plea, in that the sun 
of our American Constitution, that 
star of hope to countless millions yet 
unborn, will continue to rise higher 
and higher. 



To Higher Things 

In the great drama of the world, 
empires have had their rise and fall. 
Nations have come up through great 
tribulation and are now basking in the 
power of their political supremacy. 
The Caesars, the Napoleons, the Wash- 
ingtons, and Lincolns have all played 
their parts, in their respective turns, 
and have left the stage of action. 
Amidst all these shifting scenes walks 
the Macbeth with carnage in his 
wake, and thus the pages of history 
are spotted with precious drops of 
blood. In that Eastern Land, by 
Galilee, appears the torch that is des- 
tined to blaze the way until its ray shall 
penetrate the remotest corners of the 
world and signify the dawn of uni- 
versal peace. But whilst all these 
mighty scenes are being enacted, while 
our eyes behold the awful pageantry, 
amidst the restless surging of the 
heaving billows of progress, shall we 
not say that beneath it all is the mighty 
force of a steadily rising tide? The 
world is rising to higher things. 

This great trend of the world's 
events includes the birth and 



rise of our own grand nation, the 
United States of America. It, too, 
has passed through its epochs of 
rest and turbulence, harmony and 
discord, peace and war; epochs 
characterized by the peaceful flow of 
the inland river on its way to join the 
gulf; epochs in which the jagged rocks 
of civil feuds have rent it in twain, 
causing a wound which the passing 
years alone can heal. Each succeeding 
period of our national history has 
brought with it characters of greate r 
or lesser renown. They, too, have 
left their impress on our national life 
and then, hsve be n ushered from the 
scene. But, what can stay the wheels 
of progress? "Westward the course 
of empire takes its way." Can it 
be said with equal truth, that with 
the extension of our border line, has 
come a gradual rise ir the nation's 
ideals? In spite of evils that do exist, 
I believe, that our grand old nation is 
rising to higher things. 

But, in this onward course of human 
affairs, in the great movements of 
historic ages, in the crucial moment, 
was not the intrinsic worth of some 
individual or individuals at the basis 
cf the result? For centuries we find 
all Europe observing the dictates 
of one man, down there in Rome, 
in the personage of the Pope; the 
same continent trembles at the foot- 
steps of the conquering Napo- 
leon; wherein would lie the value of 
American Independence, had it not 
been for the iron will and indomnitable 
courage of a George Washington; and 
tell me, ye who love the union, what 
would be the story, if that true 
American, whose praises we love to 
sing, the savior of our country, Abra- 
ham Lincoln, had not been guiding the 
Ship of State during that terrible 
crisis? 

We need not confine ourselves to 
these illustrious men whose fame is 
unquestioned. Rather let us think of 
the vast multitudes, who have 
served their God, their country, and 
their fellowmen, and have gone down 
into their graves, "unwept, unhonored, 
and unsung." Let us think of the 
rising generation that shall in a few 
short years shape the destiny of men 
and of nations. Moreover, let us think 
of ourselves. Have we realized in the 
past, are we realizing i n the present, 



COLLEGE NEWS 




O. T. EHRHART '11 
Second Orator 



the value the Creator has attached to 
our creation? Are we realizing the 
purpose of the Master Mind? What 
hope does the future have to offer? 
Of what character are the ideals that 
serve as our beacon lights to guide us 
through the haze of that unknown 
future? Are we, as individuals, 
rising to higher things? 

Embryonic in the youth of today are 
the soul, brain, and brawn of the men 
of tomorrow. Upon the nature of these 
three elements will depend the 
character of the youth ; upon the 
character of the youth, in a marked 
degree, will depend the character of 
the man; and upon the character of the 
man hangs the destiny of society. 
My first plea, then, is for a strong 
foundation upon which to build the 
superstructure. 

But, let us pause once more, and 
ask ourselves the fitting question, 
where stand we? Have we cast our 
lot with the frenzied crowd in its mad 
grapple for wealth and power, and are 
v*e bartering our souls at the mart of 
eternal sacrifice? Or do we number 
ourselves with those who worship at 
the shrine of mere pleasure located on 
the highway that leads to the sale of 
a birthright for a mess of pottage? 
Surely these are not the goals of our 
ambition. Ah no ! There is a higher 
aim in life than "wine, or sleep, or 



praise." Who would dare to own 
these as the Mecca of his hopes? 
They are as false gods luring their 
victims on to a fatal destiny. In our 
firmanent, there is a star of greater 
magnitude, to which we rnav attach 
the chariot that is bearing us above 
the sensual strata of human society. 
And then you ask, " What is that 
stai?" Is it not the star that leads 
to the realization of self? "The un- 
folding of all human capacities in con- 
formity with the demands of the 
natural and human environment." 
The accomplishment of such an end 
necessitates the trampling under foot 
all that is low and base either in 
desire, design, or deed. It is not the 
strife for that which is ignoble, but a 
mighty conflict in which the nobler 
will ascends the throne and is the 
dictator of only that which is noble, 
good, and true. 

Methinks I hear a voice saying, 
"We are living in a practical age, the 
ideal will not suffice, life is real, we 
must not soar beyond the grasp of 
human achievement." In answer I 
say, who will dare to rob the sculptor 
of the image of his mind, the incorpora- 
tion of which, is not entirely possible 
because of material limitations? 
Will we throw up our hands and cease 
the pursuit of that which may seem to 
be in the realm of the unattainable 



and yet that which is leading us on- 
ward toward the goal of ultimate per- 
fection ? May we not say with Cassius 
that the fault is not in our stars but 
in ourselves, if we be underlings. 

Are we agreed thus far, in this great 
problem of human life; that youth is 
the golden hour in which to foster or 
subdue the ancestoral tendency that 
every life should be one of noble pur- 
pose; and that the great end is the 
unfolding of the self; if so, then are 
we ready to bend our whole being to- 
ward the accomplishment of the task. 

Given that being richly endowed 
with capacity, and a lofty aim, and 
the end is not yet. The time has come 
when the pilot assumes control. What 
is that pilot? The will, strong and 
resolute, that is the pilot. It can 
steer the bark safely by the iceberg of 
materialism, through the rocky reefs 
of fame, over the -whirl-pool of plea- 
sure, into the haven of success; or it 
can wreck it beyond repair, yea, set it 
adrift on the vast expanse of blasted 
hopes or unrealized ambitions, only to 
sink in the great sea of the unknown. 

But, whilst I stand wrapped in con- 
templation of that which is yet to be, 
I catch a gleam coming from yonder 
heights; it i3 only a gleam, yet to 
me it betokens an untold vision. My 
heart throbs within me; my soul longs 
for a fuller realization of that vision 
of which only a ray has penetrated its 
way to me. But, by what course shall 
my feet be guided? That is the pro- 
blem. But stay, the light grows 
brighter, hope increases, my eyes 
behold a rugged path. If I can but 
stand on yonder summit, I shall be 
"Monarch of all I survey." 

I start to scale the rocky slope. 
There are other paths but only one 
path for me. It is rugged and steep 
but I must make the most of it. 
Could I but rid myself of this heavy 
burden wrought in the generations past 
and handed to me as my inheritance 
from my forefathers, I might with 
greater ease attain the goal. Yea, 
but did not my heritage also include 
that which is above price, the elements 
that make for success? Do I not 
claim a will enthroned, and do I not 
read that "men at some times are 
masters of their fate?" Verily so, 
upward is my course. I slay the 
brutish instinct. I am one step 



COLLEGE NEWS 



higher. I am rising by things that 
are beneath my feet, and ever as I 
rise my vision grows, and now a new 
revelation has come to me. I am not 
alone. My fellowman is my side. 
He is on the same highway and I 
cannot escape his influence nor my 
responsibility for bis welfare. To- 
gether we share the struggle. It 
must needs be so, if life is to be realiz- 
ed in all its fullness. 

Upward then we go, not with a 
single bound, but step by step, while 
the passing years roll on, ever obey- 
ing the nobler impulse, until we stand 
wrapped in that sublime atmosphere 
and view with unmixed joy the gran- 
dure of our promised land. Standing 
thus enraptured, through the deep 
caves of thought I hear a voice that 
sings : 

Build thee more stately mansions, 

my soul, 
As the swift seasons roll! 

Leave thy low vaulted past! 

Let each new temple, nobler 
than the last. 

Shut thee from heaven with a 
dome more vast, 
Till thou at length art free, 
Leaving thine outgrown shell by 

life's unresting sea ! 

Civic Righteousness 

"Righteousness exalteth a nation, 
but sin is a reproach to any people," 
said a man who, for the asking, was 
given an understanding heart that he 
might be able to discern between good 
and bad. 

Just as any chain is no stronger than 
its weakest link, so any nation is no 
stronger to perpetuate itself than its 
sins render it. As surely as the in- 
dividual must suffer the consequences 
of his sin, so surely must nations 
suffer for the sins which they harbor 
in their national lives. If Dr. Shel- 
don is correct in saying that "a nation 
has no more right to seek anything 
first, except the kingodm of righteous- 
ness, than the individual has," then, 
the statement, just made, will stand. 

Among civilized peoples the sense 
of right is a highly developed 
characteristic, and this sense becomes 
an art, for right is only right when 
done. As Fichte says, "Not merely 
to know, but according to thy know- 
ledge to do, is thy vocation;" then, 
knowing only what is right, and 
never doing it, can, in no manner nor 



measure, ever establish righteousness 
among men. 

We speak of righteousness as dis- 
seminated by religion— that phase of 
righteousness which is principally 
established thru the agency of the 
church, which teaches and emphasizes, 
more than any other institution, the 
right relation between God and man. 
Then again, we speak of social 
righteousness as pertaining to the 
domestic, industrial, economic and re- 
creative relations and activities of 
mankind. We find social righteous- 
ness to be no more nor less than the 
sense of right pcssessed by the social 
organism, representing the sum total 
of the ethical standards of the indivi- 




W. C. SHOOP '11 
Third Orator 

duals which constitute that organism. 
That sum total is the result obtained 
by the individual additions to and sub- 
tractions from social righteousness by 
the great mass of humanity. Another 
important phase of righteousness affec- 
ting the welfare of mankind is civic 
righteousness as pertaining to the civic 
life of the nation It is upon this 
phase that we wish to devote our at- 
tention briefly. 

Civic righteousness implies much; 
it yields good government; it stands 
for justice to all, and clean politics; 
caters not to mean, petty politicians; 
and finds good men and women to 
direct the civic affairs of the nation. 

But some people have a peculiar 
notion as to what constitutes civic 



righteousness; they seem to think 
that it is conceived only in legislative 
halls, born in executive sanction, and 
nurtured in judicial jurisprudence. I 
heartily agree that the personnel mov- 
ing in this sphere of civic action should 
be especiallly blest with an eye single 
to civic righteousness, but I hold also 
that if you and I wait in stupid inertia 
for judges, executors, and legislators 
to bring about a civic elysium. we shall 
be abundantly disappointed. Civic 
righteousness, like charity, begins at 
home. We, the people, should have 
a clearly-defined sense of it, and insist 
that it be established. Let us not be 
deluded with the idea that it is a 
golden orb, which, like the sun, shall 
in the sweet by and by rise, regard- 
less of our will and action, and shine 
upon our beloved land with great 
splendor. It dare not be regarded as 
a distant and foreign condition, 
arising from a mysterious somewhere, 
and coming to us like the dawn of a 
beautiful day. It must have its in- 
ception not distant from our own 
hearths and firesides. 

Civic righteousness demands that 
legislators legislate; that law-making 
bodies facilitate proper legislative 
action rather than retard or impede 
it. This time killing and "nothing 
doing" policy of some pronounced 
civic bodies, when the time is ripe for 
action, becomes a thoroughly disgust- 
ing farce to every true American, and 
stands in strange contrast to the domi- 
nant spirit of the day. Witness, if 
\ou please, the filibustering policy of 
the minority party in Congress; with- 
drawing or remaining away from ses- 
sions when important measures ought 
to go thru; the deliberately wilful 
delay of action, until, as in the case 
of the recent reciprocity agreement 
with Canada, the President had to 
come out with the big stick ultimatum 
"Ratification, or extra session" to 
learn the reason why the agreement 
was objectionable. 

Once more, civic righteousness rises 
in holy indignation and declares that 
something must be done toward effec- 
ting a uniform divorce law. Now 
some, perhaps, are saying inaudibly, 
"Stop! you are intprpolating the func- 
tion of social righteousness for civic 
rigtheousness. " I thank you, and 
would admit to be standing corrected, 



COLLEGE NEWS 



but for the fact that I need but to re- 
mind you that the civil power of some 
of the states in the Union has for 
some years past discreditably dis- 
charged its duties toward the American 
homes; that while in a way it is guard- 
ing the entrance to the sanctum of 
matrimony, at the same time it is 
holding wide open a back door of exit 
thru the nefarious divorce system. 
Again, I call upon you to witness the 
testimony of a Washington lady who, 
being about to marry, was importuned 
by well-wishing friends not to become 
a party to that particular marriage 
contract which was considered by them 



exit from the sanctum within which 
stands the hymeneal altar, swing too 
easily on their hinges due to too fre- 
quent usage. Attorneys who figure 
before the courts tell us that divorce 
is the safety-valve for unhappy homes, 
but some one has facetiously remarked 
that it has developed into a festering 
disease; while divorce may be termed 
the surgery for the ills of marriage, 
the conclusion is justifiable that the 
first operations were so deplorably un- 
successful that they developed into a 
running sore. What was first intend- 
ed to relieve only radical marriage in- 
congruities now has become a common 



county, let us beware lest we are of 
those of whom Carlyle speaks when he 
says "To the vulgar tew things are 
wonderful that are not distant." 
What may be wonderfully scandalous 
at a distance may happen to be near 
at hand and become reprehensible at 
home, for all who quaked when the 
Vote-selling Exposition began were by 
no means in Adams county exclusively. 

Dr. Reed, president of Dickinson 
College, branded vote-selling as "the 
most dastardly crime against the com- 
monwealth." 

As remarked before, civic righteous- 
ness must have its birth in the hearts 




PHILO HALL 



to be grossly incompatible, tD all of 
which importunities she finally replied : 
"Well, if I do marry and find it was 
a mistake, can't I get a divorce?" A 
St, Louis chaffeur asked for a divorce 
from his wife on the ground that his 
wedding was only a larK. If divorces 
are to be granted on that sort of plea, 
all the courts of the land will not be 
able to attend to all the business they 
will have on hand. You and I can 
barely imagine, much less ever deter- 
mine, how strong is the undercurrent 
of that sentiment among marriageable 
people, just because the back doors of 



practice. The greater tolerance, we, 
the people give to the divorce habit, 
the more we are undermining the 
stability of moral character and of 
the home. When these two fail, we 
can't hope to have a government worth 
living under, or a nation that has with- 
in itself the powar of its perpetua- 
tion. 

That voters, as citizens of the 
United States shall preserve inviolate 
and regard as sacredly personal the 
prerogative to vote is demanded by the 
principles of civic righteousness. 
While we look away to distant Adams 



and minds of the American citizenship. 
Yet it remains, however, a fact that 
there is little or no credit due our re- 
presentative bodies which require such 
overwhelming pressure from their con- 
stituencies to move them to act favor- 
ably on issues which they already know 
]\c close to the hearts of well-thinking 
people. Such dilatoriness can only be 
understood to mean that in many cases 
our civil representatives are, so far 
as moral issues are concerned at least, 
in the same category with the man 
who when he was taken to task for not 
supporting a certain moral issue, 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuis 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, '12 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

CLAIR F. HARNISH, '12 
JOHN W. ISCHY, '12 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '12 
EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 
AMOS H. WEIGLE, '13 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

V. D. MULHOLLEN, '13, 
ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

JOHN B. LYTER '14 
JOHN E. SHERK '14 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 



Address all business communications 
to V. D. Mulhollen, Box — , all 
other matter to Room 19, Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

replied, "I'm no moralist, I'm a 
political!." When promising young 
lawyers who become inveigled in 
swindling scandals are found out, 
and are told that their actions are 
contrary to right principles, flip- 
pantly declare that "The world does 
not run on principles," it is high time 
that we carefully avoid making such 
the custodians of our civil rights. 

For civic righteousness to triumph 
in our nation, it is imperative that 
the franchised citizenship makes an 
intelligent study of her civic life, and 
assumes an earnest interest in her poli- 
tical welfare. Savs Samuel Capen, 
one of the foremost citizens of Massa- 
chusetts : "I am more concerned over 
the percentage of citizens who have 
a vote, but do not use it, than I am 
for all for which the red flag of 
anarchy stands." To say that the 
majority of voters are cursed with the 
disposition of the political corrup- 
tionist is hardly permissible; hence, 
it follows, that if each voter who has 
a good sense of right, at the right 
time and every time, would do his 
political duty, civic righteousness 
would rapidly gain ground and have 
the esteem of ell honorable citizens. 

Let us remember then that the in- 
dividual who would hinder proper 



legislation, who would sell his vote, 
who would be indifferent to wholesome, 
moral issues, who would dare to at- 
tempt to vitiate the sanctity of the 
marriage bond, or dare to endorse 




L. L. SPESSARD '11 
Reader 



kindred civic vices, must ever be listed 
in the category of "undesirable cit- 
izens," since^he is an avowed enemy 
of civic righteousness, for it is that 
that exalteth a nation, but civic un- 
righteousness is a reproach to any 
people. 



Lecture 

The Saint Stephen's Sunday School 
class of the local U. B. church, in an 
effort to raise a pledge for the new 
church fund, presented Prof. Shenk in 
his lecture entitled, "Thou Art the 
Man" on Monday evening in the col- 
lege chapel, to an appreciative au- 
dience. 

The Professor paid his tribute to 
all systems of reform which as it were 
strive to brush back the waves of crime 
after they have become violent and 
unmanageable instead of striking at 
the very bottom of the evil by re- 
moving the cause of crime. Evils can 
not be legislated out of existence, by 
any body of lawmakers, they must be 
removed by an intelligent franchise. 
The modern fads such as the recall and 
short ballot are only a means to cover 
the issues of deeper significance. They 
all point backward to the primitive 
assemblies of Greece and Rome. 

An earnest appeal was made to the 
youth of the day for purity in all the 



walks of life. A proper civic condi- 
tion can come only thru every one's 
payment of special attention to their 
own duties. 

Lebanon Valley 

Man Honored 

PROF. J. H. ALLEMAN '02 RE- 
ELECTED SUPERINTENDENT 

OF DUBOIS' SCHOOLS 
The Dubois, Pa., Daily Express of 
Wednesday makes the following men- 
tion of the re-election of its school 
superintendent, Dr. J. H. Alleman, 
formerly of this city : 

At a meeting of the DuBois school 
board last evening, City Superinten- 
dent Dr. J. H. Alleman was unau- 
iinously chosen as the head of the 
DuBois schools for the succeeding 
term of three years. His salary was 
increased to $2,400, this increase 
being a recognition of the fine work 
and administrative ability shown by 
him during the past twelve years. 

Dr. Alleman did not solicit the vote 
of a single member of the board nor 
did he ask for an increase, but the 
vote was unanimous and the increase 
was made voluntarily and ^without 
opposition, as it is recognized that 
Dr. Alleman has done untold good for 
the public school system of DuBois. 

He has labored earnestly for its 
upbuilding, and has raised the stan- 
dard to a high degree. He is re- 
cognized throughout the State as an 
educator of great ability, and this year 
he had requests to make application 
in other cities, but he believes that 
the opportunities for work here are 
exceptional and preferred to remain. 

Steelton Here Saturday 

After the good showing of our team 
here last Friday we feel sure of 
another victory over the boys from 
the steel town, Nearly all the games 
from now until the end of the season 
will be on the home grounds, and 
with good loyal support there is no 
reason why L. V. should not pile up 
more victories. If you are loyal to 
the White and, Blue you'll come out 
and howl Saturday. L. V. expects 
every man (which embraces woman) 
to do his duty and then some. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Lebanon Valley Downs 

Delaware 8-5 



In a loosely played game L. V. beat 
Delaware by the socre of 8-. 5 
Raughley pitched excellent ball but 
the poor support behind him was'mainly 
responisble for most of the runs. 
Little did not have to exert himself at 
any time during the game. He had 
eight strike outs to hi's credit. One 
of the features of the game was Leh- 
man's homer in the fifth with one on 
base. Carmany and Lyter played a 
nice game in the field. Our boys 
showed a decided improvement in their 
hitting in Friday 's game. Out of the 
seven hits, there was one homer and 
three two baggers. 

The score by innings : 

First inning. Ward struck out. 
Ounn singled to center, stole second, 
out on throw from Lehman to Miller. 

Marshall singled, out at second 
Lehman to Carmany. 

Miller singled, reached third, out 
Marshall to Huston. Hummel out 
fl ied to Huston. Smith smashed out 
a two bagger. Harnish out, Rauhley 
to Hoke. 

Second inning. Hoke struck out. 
Jops flew out to Lyter. Harvey hit 
a single, reached second. Knopf out, 
Smith to Lehman. 

Lehman out, Raughley to Hoke 
Lyter reached first on an error. Loser 
reached first on an error. Lyter and 
Loser score on Carmany's two bagger. 
Little singled scoring Carmany. 
Miller reached first on an error, Hum- 
mel flew out to Marshall. Little and 
Miller scored on Smith's double. 
Harnish out Harvey to Hoke. 

Third inning. Houston out Carmany 
to Hoke. Raughley struck out. 
Ward struck out. 

Lehman out Dunn to Hoke. Lyter 
out Harvey to Hoke Loser struck out. 

Fourth inning. Dunn flew out to 
Lyter, Marshall singled, Hoke sirgled 
scoring Marshall. Joss flew out to 
Carmany, Harvey out, to Loser. 

Carmany reached first on an error. 
Little flew out to Harvey. Miller 
walked. Hummel out Harvey to Leh- 
man. Carmany scored. Smith flew 
out to Marshall. 

Fifth inning. Knopf walked, 



Huston flew out to Little Raughley 
singled. Ward and Little to Lehman 
Dunn reached first on passed ball. 
Knopf and Raughley scored. Marshall 
to left field and reached third on 
Hummel 's error. Dunn scored. Hoke 
struck out. 

Harnish singled. Lehman hit a 
homer to deep center scoring Harnish. 
Lyter flew out to Knopf. Loser nut to 
Hoke. Carmany struck out. 

Sixth inning. Joss flew out to 
Loser. Harvey out, Smith to Lehman. 
Knopf singled. Huston flew out to 
Carmany. 

Little out, Raughley to Hoke. 
Miller reached first on error. Hummel 
reached first on error. Smith out. 
Raughley to Hoke. Harnish out, to 
Hoke. 

Seventh inning. Raughley struck 
out. Ward walked. Dunn flew out to 
Harnish. Marshall struck out. 

Lehman out trying stretch single 
into a two bagger Hoke to Dunn. 
Lyter, out stealing Houston to Dunn. 
Loser flew out to Dunn. 

Eighth inning. Hoke struck out. 
Joss singled. Harvey hit to Smith. 
Joss and Harvey out Smith to Car- 
many to Lehman. 

Carmany struck out. Little flew out 
to catcher Miller out Harvey to Hoke. 

Ninth inning. Knopf flew out to 
Carmany. Huston got a pass, stole 
second and scored on wards out Little 
to Lehman Dunn flew out to Hummel. 

The important feature of the game 
was the long drive by Lehman. The 
pitcher sent the ball to the right place 
and Lehman landed upon it making 
one of the longest drives ever seen 
upon our field. 

The score : 

DELAWARE 

R. H. 0. A. E. 
Ward rf 1 

Dunn 2b 113 12 

Marshall If 12 2 10 

Hoke lb 1 11 1 1 

Joss 3b 10 

Harvey ss 1115 2 

Knoff cf 110 

Huston c 13 6 10 

Raughley p 110 3 1 



Totals 



5 8 24 12 7 



LEBANON VALLEY 

R. H. O. A. E. 
Miller c 119 

Hummel, If 111 

Smith, 2b 2 1 1 



Harnish, rf 
Lehman, lb 
J. Lyter, 3b 
Loser cf 
Carmany, ss 
Little, p 



10 




2 
2 



Totals 8 7 27 10 2 

Delaware 00130000 1—5 

Lebanon Valley 05012000 x— 8 

Two-base Hits Smith 2; Carmany; 
Home Run Lehman ; Left on Bases 
Lebanon Valley ; Delaware, 4; Struck 
Out by Little, 8; by Raughley, 3; 
Double Plays, Smith to Carmany to 
Lehman; First Base on Balls, off 
Little, 2; off Raughley 1, Timel hour, 
45 minutes. Umpire Barnhart. 
BASE BALL BINGLES 

Who says "Johnny" isn't our 
longest hitter? 

A terrorless game isn't an errorless 
one. 

Little had big support. 

One reason Delaware got a defeat 
was because she wasn't quick enough 
on 'em. 

Hummel struck a gopher hole when 
he started to go for that fly. 

The "Kid" had the english on his 
parabolas Friday. 

Lyter's a thief. See "stolen 
bases. " 

"Good" team here Saturday, Steel- 
ton, Y. M. C. A. 

The varsity will play the Steelton 
Y. M. C. A. team on the home grounds 
Saturday at 3 p. m. 



Senior Oratory Recitals 

Two of the seniors of the Depart- 
ment of Oratory, will give their 
recitals next week in Engle Hall. 
Miss Verda A. Snyder, on Tuesday 
evening, May 16, and Mrs. Nona 
Downey Hockenbury, on Thursday 
evening, May 18. 

Miss Snyder has made an attractive 
arrangement of "The Christmas 
Carol," by Charies Dickens. She 
will be assisted by Mr. Kimmel, 
basso, and Mr. Light, violinist, of 
Lebanon. Mies Snyder has been 
working faithfully under the direction 
of Miss Adams and we can bo assured 
the recital will be a thoroughly enjoy- 
able one. Her impersonation of 
Scrooge, the ghosts, and other charac- 
ters of Dickens' story, is excellent and 
discriminating. Mrs. Hockenbury 
will read her cutting of "Rebecca of 
Sunnybrook Farm, "by Kate Douglass 
Wiggin. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Calendar. 



Tuesday, 6 p. m. — Prayer Meeting. 

Thursday, 7:45 p. m.— Senior Reci- 
tal, Miss Detweiler. 

Friday, 7:15 p. m. --Societies. 

Saturday, 2:45 p. in., L. V. vs. 
Steelton Y.M. C. A. 5:30 Supper Art 
Department. 

Sunday 1 p. m. Christian Associa- 
tions. 




Lisa Lucinda Potter of York Pa., 
visited L. V. to attend Philo exercises. 
Lester A. Rodes was responsible. 

Miss Belle C. sister of Artus 0. 
Kauffman, '11, and Miss Anna Zeigler 
of Dallastown, Pa. attended the anni- 
versary Friday evening. 

Edna Harnish of Carlisle, Pa., 
visited her brother C. Ray Harnish 
over week-end. 

Miss Maud Shirey, of New Park, 
Pa., was entertained by Miss Bom- 
berger Friday and Saturday last. 

Miss Mary McKee, of Bryn Mawr, 
Pa., visited L. V. for Philo. 

Miss Jessie, sister of Paul R. 
Koontz, was the guest of Miss Mary 
Spayd Friday and Saturday. 

Earl Spessard, '11, sang and spoke 
at the C. E. Anniversary exercises 
of the Duncannon U. B. church, S. G. 
Zeigler, '11, pastor Sunday evening. 

Dr. Keister, president, has gone 
West for some time in the interests 
of the college. 

Misses McKee and Yarkers and 
Messrs. Brunner and Ehrhart enjoyed 
an outing at Mt. Gretna Saturday. 

Loua Chaney of Uager3town. Md., 
was the guest of her cousin Helen 
Weidler, '12, on Friday and Saturday. 

Miss Pearl Wolfe, of Shoemakers- 
ville was th9 guest of Grace Smith, 
Oratory, '12, over Philo Anniversary. 

The Misses Barbara and Blanche 
Hillard, of Harrisburg: Mary McKee, 
of Brjn Mawr; Mary Nissley of 
Middletown; Lulu and Esther Long, 
of Shippensburg were entertained at 
the home of the Spessard's during 
anniversary. 



Rev. £. S. Bowman Goes to 
Philadelphia 

The Rev. Dr. Edward S. Bowman, 
formerly of Dayton, 0., preached his 
inaugural sermon yesterday as pastor 
of the Emmanuel Presbyterian Church, 
West Philadelphia. He succeeds the 
Rev. David Garrett Smith, who or- 
ganized the congregation nearly 11 
years ago. 

Doctor Bowman is a popular mini- 
ster, and was wanted by a large por- 
tion of the congregation of Bethany 
Church to fill that pulpit. He is a 
graduate of Lebanon Valley College, 
and^was pastor of the United Brethren 
Church, in Harrisburg, for nine years. 
He left the United Brethren Church 
and took a post-graduate course in the 
Princeton Theological Seminary. 
For the past 19 months he has been 
pastor of the Oak Street Presbyterian 
Church in Dayton. During his ministry 
the church received 82 new members. 
Rev. Bowman was a member of the 
class of '90. 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



Lost 

An L. V. sweater was taken from 
the athletic field on Saturday either 
unintentionally or otherwise. The 
return of the same will be greatly 
appreciated by the owner. 

J. K. LEHMAN 



CLIONIAN 

Piano Solo, Katie Gingrich ; Presi- 
dent's Address, Lizzie Lau; Applied 
Quotations, Sara Zimmerman; Trio, 
Edith Lehman, Helen Brightbill, 
Lottie Spessara ; Sketch, Helen 
Weidler, Clara Horn, Florence Clip- 
pinger; Reading, Edna Yarkers; Vocal 
Solo, Myrl Turby ; Farewell, Carrie 
Light; Piano Solo, Sara Strickler. 
PHILOKOSMIAN 

Resume, H. H. McConnel ; Oration, 
Paul Loser ; Debate : Resolved, that 
Athletics are the best advertising 
medium of a college; Affirmative, 
Edward Kreider, L. A. Rodes; Nega- 
tive, D. E. Zimmerman, C. F. Harnish; 
Violin Solo, L. A. Rodes; The Ger- 
man as a Chemist, Harry Denlinger; 
Living Thoughts, Editor. 

KALOZETEAN 

Current Events, Allen Walters; 
Essay, Paul Strickler; Piano Solo, 
Allen Meyer; Debate: Resolved, 
That a College is Justified in using 
men on its Athletic Teams who are 
not bonafide students; Affirmative, 
John Lyter, Clyde Eby ; Negative P. 
B. Gibble.Wm Stager. 



Art Supper 

Ttie art department is going to have 
a supper Saturday evening May 13. 



Remember 

The Bizarre 1912 

JUST COMING FROM THE PRESS 

The ONLY Publication of the 
Year at 
Lebanon Valley College 

Leave your subscription with the Business Man- 
ager. Come early and avoid the rush. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



L. V. Academy Beats 

Lebanon High 

The Academy boys surprised the 
Lebanon High School team when they 
defeated them on their own ground on 
Tuesday by a score 9 to 1. Although 
the grounds were in no condition what- 
ever to play, our boys played through 
the game without an error. In the 
first inning the Academy scored three 
runs, the other six runs were scattered 
through the remaining innings. The 
Academy has three more games with 
Lebanon High, two will be played on 
our home field May 16th and May 30th 
A. m. 

Score : 

L. V. A. 9. Lebanon High 1. 



Alumni 



Preps vs. Albright Reserves 

Albright Reserves journeyed to Ann- 
ville on Saturday morning where they 
met the strong L. V. Academy team. 
The game resulted in a victory for the 
Reserves by the score of 11-8. In the 
seventh inning the Academy started a 
batting rally. When the smoked of 
battle had cleared away six runs were 
marked to their credit. In the eighth 
two more runs were scored by the 
Academy. The game was marred by 
many errors. Light pitched winning 
ball, his opponents having but six hits 
while he had fourteen strikeouts to 
his credit. The score : 

LEBANON VALLEY ACADEMY 

R. H. 0. A. E. 
Dunlap 3b 112 2 1 

Kreider ss 1 2 2 1 

M. Light c 1 1 12 1 2 

B. Light If 110 1 

Meyer lb 119 10 

Denlinger 2b rf 2 1 2 

Eby cf 1110 1 

Long rf 2b 1 2 2 

H. Light p 10 14 1 



Total 


8 


9 27 11 


11 


ALBRIGH 


T SECOND 






R. 


H. O. A. 


E. 


C. Smith rf 


1 


2 





Hopps If 


3 


2 





Krider lb 


2 


16 


1 


Lu*z c 


3 


2 12 





Hartzler 3b 





1 1 1 





Glassmyer cf p 





1 


1 


Musselman 2b 





2 4 


1 


J. Smith ss 


1 


2 





Erdman p cf 


1 


12 


2 


Totals 


11 


6 2 7 


5 


L. V. Academy 


00000062 


-8 


Albright Second 


10332002 0- 


11 



Edna Delilah Yeatts, '09, instructor 
in English at the Shippensburg State 
Normal School was here for the anni- 
versary, and incidaentally visited some 
of her friends. 

Victor Weidler, '10, was the guest 
of his sister and brother over Sunday. 

Adam Flook. '08. returned to col- 
lege for a few days at the week end. 

F. Berry Plummer, '05, was the 
guest of his brother over Anniversary. 

Harry Bomberger ; '10, visited 
friends Friday and Saturday. 

Miss Alice I utz, '09, conservatory, 
was visiting friends here over Sunday. 

Max F. Lehmn, '07, returned to 
school for the anniversary. 



Geological Expedition 

A number of the boys, accompanied 
by Prof. H. E. Wanner, made a trip 
to Cornwall recently in the interests 
of the class in Geology. While there 
they visited the large iron mines and 
explored the surrounding country. 
They returned after a strenuous day, 
exceedingly tired, but pleased with the 
many things they had seen and the 
splendid time the Professor had shown 
them. Those composing the party 
were: Artus O. Kauffman, '11, Oliver 
Butterwick, '12, C. C. Smith, '12, 
Clair F. Harnish, '12. Roger B. Savior, 
'11, Ivan Ressler, '13, Guy Wingerd, 
'12, Jesse Reed, '12, Francis Kennedy, 



BQNEBRHKE 



DAYTON, O, 



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1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
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2. The English. 

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4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy*' or 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Kxpenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
single students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 
For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin, 
Address the President, 

J. P. LANDIS 

Or J. E. FOUT 

Businsss Manager 



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STEPHEN HUBERTIS 

Book Binder 

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Magazines and College Books 
Rebound. 



College news 



11, J. C. Shively, '12, Don Keister, 
'12, E. H. Carmany, '12, Samuel B. 
Plummer, '12, P. F. Roberts, '13, and 
Prof. H. E Wanner. 



Faculty Musicians 

Profs. Lehman, Schroyer, and Long 
journeyed to Lemberger's and Mt. Nebo 
with Rev. A. S. Beckley, Sunday 
when rally day for Lebanon Valley 
College was observed. The quartette 
furnished the music for the occasion, 
with Prof. Sfhroyer directing, while 
Prof. Lehman lead the congregational 
music. 



Freshmen vs. Annville High 

The Freshmen received a close call 
at the hands of the Annville High 
School on Monday night on the athletic 
field. During the frst inning the 
Freshmen got six runs and then the 
boys blanked them with the score 11-6 
until the seventh when the Freshies 
braced up and captured a half dozen 
more making the score 12:11. This 
was a game conspicuous for its errors. 



Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. 

The regular missionary joint session 
was held on the campus. The three 
phases of a missionary's life were dis- 
cussed. Florence Clippinger, the 
leader, described what their physical 
conditions snould be and also the 
physical work they were expected to 
do. Mr. Richie spoke of the intellec- 
tual side. It is our duty to share our 
learning with those of the darker con- 
tinents. Mr. Leibold spoke of their 
great spiritual power. The program 
proved one of the most interesting of 
the year. 



Prep. Chicken and Noodle 
Supper 

The Academy in an effort to raise 
necessary funds for the baseball season, 
gave a chicken and noodle supper in 
the old Academy building on Saturday 
night. The supper was financially a 
success. They were well patronized 
by the good people of the town and 
disposed of all of their supplies. 



We saw a thing of greenish hue, 
And thought it was a lawn of 
grass. 

But when to it we closer drew, 

We found it was the Freshman 
class. 

-EXCHANGE 



jCebanon TSalley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

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COIiliEGE m^TS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, JWay 16, 1911 Ho. 32 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



L. V. vs. Steelton 

In a one sided game on Saturday the 
blue and white easily defeated Steel- 
ton Y. M. C. A. by the score 27-1. 
L. V. garnered a total of eighteen hits 
from the visiting pitchers, including 
four three baggers and three doubles. 
Lehman had four long hits to his 
credit. Little had two of the four 
three baggers. 

Hughes for the visitors was wild. 
He nit three men and walked three. 
Fifteen of the hits were gathered 
from his delivery in six and one-third 
innings. Irvin held L. V. to three 
hits in two and two-third innings. 
Little for the home team did not have 
to exert himself and only pitched five 
curved balls through the entire game. 
In the fifth inning he retired the 
side on three thrown balls. He re- 
ceived great support. Dunalp, who 
played for the visitors scored their 
only run. The game was but a good 
illustration of "drei-socker. " There 
was nothing to it but going to bat and 
then running around the bases. The 
score : 

STEELTON 





R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Miller ss 





1 


2 


6 


2 


Klerner 3b 











1 





Jeffries If 





1 


3 








Dunlap 2b 


1 





2 


4 


3 


Fackler ef 

















Irving lb p 





2 


10 








Hughes p lb 





1 


2 


1 


2 


Klugh rf 





1 


1 








Noll c 








3 


1 





Total 


1 


6 


3 


13 


7 


LEBANON VALLEY 








R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Miller c 


5 


2 


8 


3 





J. Lyter, 3b 


3 


1 


1 


1 





Lehman, lb 


3 


4 


11 








Harnish, rf 


3 


3 


1 


1 





Smith, 2b 


2 





1 


4 





Young, If 





1 











Loser cf 


3 


2 


1 








Carmany, ss 


4 


1 


4 


2 


2 


Little, p 


4 


3 





1 





Totals 


27 


18 


27 


12 


2 



Lebanon Valley 1 3 4 3 11 5 x-27 
Steelton 010 00 0—1 

Two baggers, Miller 2, Young; 
Three baggers, Lehman 2, Little 2 ; 
Struck out by Little 7, by Hughes 1, 
liases on balls of Hughes 3, off Irvin 2. 

BASE BALL BINGLES 

Bang ! Bang ! Bang ! Bang ! What a 
merry-go-round ! 

For sale : Worn out score-keeper. 

Another Normal game Saturday. 

We got batting practice anyhow. 

Little fans a chap in ease. Ever 
seen a Japanese fan? 

High-balls and base balls are opposite 
extremes. 

The pitcher that goes to the well 
too often gets soaken. 

Three baggers were plentiful from 

Lehman down to Little, or from little 

- 

up. 

Everybody out to beat E. Oram 
Lyte's bunch Saturday. Help put out 
their light. We can do it, if we 
will. If we wont Millers— ville. 

Millersviile vs. Varsity 

The Millersviile S. N. S. team will 
be here Saturday, May 20 for a game 
upon our grounds. This will be a 
good game for they gave the varsity a 
kalosomining several weeks ago upon 
their own grounds to the tune of 4:0. 
This was our only shut out of the 
teason and the boys will be after their 
opponents scalps. Remember the 
date and be on hand and encourage the 
team to do its very best. 

Piano Recital 

On the evening of May 4, Miss Mae 
Meyer, gave a very pleasing musical 
recital in Engle conservatory. Miss 
Meyer is a member of the senior class 
in Music. She is an accomplished 
musician and her recital reflected much 
credit to herself and the department 
she represents. Mr. Harry Ulrich. 
'14, a baritone soloist assisted Miss 
Meyer. 



Calendar. 



Tuesday, May 16, Senior Recital 
Verda A. Snyder. 6 p. m. Prayer 
Meeting. 

Wednesday May 17—12:30 Special 
Business Session Y. M. C. A. library. 

Thursday May 18, 7 p. m. Minis- 
terial Association at home of P. B. 
Gibble. 

Friday May 19, 7 :15 —Societies :joint 
session Clio-Kalo. 

• Saturday May 20, 2:30 p. m. Base- 
ball L. V. vs. Millersviile S. N. S. 

Sunday May 21 —1 p. m. Y. M. and 
Y. W. C. A. 

Tuesday May 23— Senior Recital 
Edith Gingrich. 

Program 

Mathematical Round Table, May 24, 
1911 ; Experiments in Teaching Mathe- 
matic?. L. A. Rodes, Elizabeth A. 
Lau; Idolatry in Mathematics, Claude 
Reddick. 

Department, of Music 
Summer Session 

Prof. Sheldon will remain after the 
close of the college year in June to 
conduct a summer session. Courses 
will be offered in Pianoforte, Pipe- 
organ, and Harmony. The session 
will begin June 12, and will con- 
tinue for six weeks. 

1913 Elects Bizarre Staff 

The class of 1913 elected the 
following staff to produce the Bizarre 
1913: Editor-in-chief, A. H. Weigle; 
Ass't Editor-in-chief, G. A. Richie; 
Associate Editors, C. Y. Ulrich, Paul 
Loser; Department Editors, Edna 
Yarkers, Clara K. Horn, Edith M. 
Lehman, G. A. Williams; Poetess, 
Sara Zimmerman ; Business Mgr., V. 
D. Mulhollen; Ass't Business Mgrs., 
Boaz. G. Light, Earl G. Loser; 
Artist Florence Christeson; Ass't 
Artist, Florence Clippinger. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College Jlecus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, '12 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
CLAIR F. HARNISH, '12 
JOHN W. ISCHY, '12 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '12 
EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 
AMOS H. WEIGLE, '13 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

V. D. MULHOLLEN, '13, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

JOHN B. LYTER '14 
JOHN E. SHERK '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to V. D. Mulhollen, Box — , all 
other matter to Room 19, Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

The base ball season so far at 
Lebanon Valley has been a decided 
success. The team has lost only three 
games out of the seven played, and 
the scores in those games were credit- 
able ones. We admit that the number 
of games on our pchedule are scanty, 
but the student body, in the main, is 
to be blamed for this deficiency. 
Can the manager schedule a heavy 
season when he lacks the funds with 
which to back it? This lack is due to 
a large number of the students not 
doing their part, namely, paying their 
athletic dues. If each student would 
do his part we could have two games 
each week and have as many home 
games as visiting games. The home 
games are the ones that bring out col- 
lege spirit and enthusiasm. Smaller 
colleges than ours can have a full and 
successful schedule and there is no rea- 
son why we cannot. May those who 
have not done their little part, "feel 
their nerve," and "get wise. " 

Lebanon Valley has excellent ma- 
terial for a base ball team and had 
she a coach to develop the same, we 
are sure that it would be able to go 
against any college team and come 
back with a victory to its credit. 
There are many fellows here who could 
be developed into professional players 
but there is no person present who is 



able to instruct them. Again we can 
point to those smaller colleges and 
look|with shame at our own. Come let 
us all assist in the base ball season at 
Lebanon Valley. 

The work of the Womans' Board of 
Lebanon Valley College is doing ex- 
cellent work. The campus is being 
brought into fine shape through their 
efforts. The rough places are being 
smoothed and bare places covered with 
a soft green coat of grass. Through 
their efforts the superintendent of 
grounds and buildings is at work daily 
keeping the walks in condition and 
the grass and dandelions from be- 
coming too tall. All the stones and 
debris have been cleared from the lawn 
to such an extent that it is beginning 
to rival the most beautiful lawn of 
some artistic home. 

The work of the new senior-junior 
Council must not be over looked. Be- 
fore they took charge of affairs around 
the boys' dormitory this spring, the 
hall ways and closets were filled with 
refuse to such an extent that it was 
difficult to make one's way to his 
room. Now things have changed. 
The halls and 100ms are cleared with 
the utmost care and every thing is as 
clean as a newly built house not yet 
occupied. This one instance goes to 
prove that the best and only method 
of governing around Lebanon Valley is 
that of* the student government. 

With the hearty cooperation of the 
faculty, the student government will 
be a great success and much of the 
trouble will be eradicated. May the 
improvement continue and be carried 
into the on-coming year. 

Turn on the Light* 

The following editorial which ap- 
peared in the March number of the 
Hiram "Advance" appeals to us as 
displaying the true college spirit. 

"There has always been a plea ad- 
vanced that nothing should be 
published in the college paper that 
might show outsiders things were not 
all right in Hiram. If an article 
were published condemning rabid 
society spirit, a howl has been raised 
that the outside ought not know such 
things. If we 'got after' delinquent 
officers it was 'poor taste; 'twill hurt 
the college.' Now we realize quite 



clearly that the Advance is not read 
by the whole nation. We know it is 
not read entirely by many students. 
Indeed there are few outside of Hiram 
who do more than glance through it. 
This constant fear that something in 
it will 'hurt us outside' has little 
foundation. If anyone does happen to- 
read such an article, instead of saying, 
'there's z poor college,' he says, 
'there's a college paper that is trying 
to influence student life for good.' If 
we have published things that hurt, 
it has been with the constant aim that 
conditions in Hiram college might be 
bettered. It is our opinion that such 
a purpose should be one of the chief 
ends of the Advance. We hope thafe-- 
whenever publicity will do good,, the 
light will be turned on. " —Exchange 

Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting Sunday afternoon was 
led by Warren B. Hayes. His sub- 
ject, "The Limitations of Life" was 
well discussed after which there was 
a general discussion. The substance 
of the remarks may be summed up in 
part in "Every man in his life time 
needs to thank his faults" and limita- 
tions. 

There will be a special business 
session of the Y. M. C. A., Wednes- 
day May 17 at 12:30 prompt. The 
question for decision is the all-impor- 
tant one concerning summer-con- 
ferences and our delegation there. 
We are especially urged to send dele- 
gates to Pocono Pines this summer. 
We are assured that Pocono will be 
on a par with NGrthfield and has the 
advantage of being less distant. This 
conference lasts from June 14 to 22nd. 

Senior Recital 

The second Pianoforte Recital was 
given by Miss Ruth Christina Det- 
weiler in Engle Auditorium, Thurs- 
day, May 11, 1911 at 8 p. m. She 
was verv ably assisted by Misses Grace 
Naomi Smith and Edna E. Yarkers 
both members of the Oratory depart- 
ment. Miss Detweiler rendered her 
selections on the piano in a very ex- 
cellent manner before an appreciative 
audience. She was presented a large 
number of carnations and roses by her 
many friends. She snowed, in her 
recital, some of the splendid work 
that is being done by the department 
of Music. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



PHILOKOSMIAN 
Resume, Robert Hartz ; Mayor Rey- 
burn, Henry Kreider; Debate: Re- 
solved, That the Influence of the Ame- 
rican Stage is uplifting rather than 
Demoralizing; Affirmative P. F. 
Roberts, S. O. Grimm; Negative, G. 
A. Richie, A. H. Weigle; Piano Solo, 
Earl Loser; A Freshman's Impres- 
sions of the L. V. Faculty, Jno. 
Shirk. 

Clio.-Kalo. Joint* Session 

Piano Solo, Vera Myers ; Pennsy- 
lvania Dutch Dialogue, C. Y. Ulrich, 
D. E. Young ; Oration, H. E. Snavely; 
Vocal Solo, H. E. Ulrich; Original 
Story, Helen Brightbill; Mock Trial, 
Charlton, Ressler, Ellis, Dunlap, 
Kennedy, Landis; Piano Duett, Mary 
Spayd, Katie Gingrich; Olive Branch 
and Examiner, Editors. 



L. V. Academy vs. Reading 
High School 

L. V. Academy journeyed to 
Reading on Friday where they met 
defeat at the hands of the strong 
Reading High][team to the tune of 6-1 
Reading won by superior all-around 
playing and daring base running. The 
Preps showed the lack of practice in 
their team work. They out-hit the 
boys from the pretzel town but could 
not hit when hits meant runs. The 
score : 

READING H. S. 

.R H. O. A. E. 
Reysnyder cf 10 

Posey ss 2 15 10 

Hartman 3b 2 2 5 1 

Snell c 10 6 3 

Wanner lb 2 6 2 1 

G. Reipsnyder If 
Bates 22b 12 
Sphon rf 2 
Kauffman p 110 2 

Totals 6 6 27 11 1 
LEBANON VALLEY ACADEMY 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Dunlap 3b 11111 

Kreider ss 10 1 

M. Light c 2 1110 

H. Light p 114 
Long 2b 13 
Denlinger rf 10 
Meyer lb 3 
Young lb 10 
Eby cf 4 
B. Light If 2 



Senior Oratory Recital 

On Thursday evening May 18, at 
7:45 p. in. Mrs. Nora Downey 
Hockenbury will read her cutting of 
"Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm" by 
Kate Douglass Wiggin. Her imper- 
sonations are good and true, that of 
Rebecca being especially excellent. 
She will be assisted by Miss Estelle 
Butler, contralto, of Carlisle, Pa. 
The public is invited to attend this 
recital. 




Alumni 



Max F. Lehman, '07, has been 
given a scholarship in the mathemati- 
cal course at the University of Penn. 

John H. Sprecher, '07 is principal 
of the Honeybrook borough schools. 
He has been re-elected for next term 
with an increase in salary. 





Items of Interest 

Miss Dodge has been called away to 
New Egland because of the death of 
her aunt. The News extends to her 
its heartiest sympathy. 

Prof. Shenk delivered the com- 
mencement address at the graduating 
exercises of the High School at Honey 
Brook, Chester Countj, Pa., Friday 
night, May 12, John H. Sprecher, '07, 
Principal. 



BOWEBBflKE 
SEPIWY 



DAYTON, a 



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Total 



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The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
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2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy' 1 or 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
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Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
single students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 
For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin, 
Address the President, 

J. P. LANDIS 

Or J. K. FOUT 

Business Manager 



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W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
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Send for it today. 

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W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 
STEPHEN HUBERTIS 

Book Binder 

320 Market St., HARRISBURG, PA. 

Magazines and College Books 
Rebound. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



S. G. Ziegler, 11 conducted a funeral 
at Duncannon Monday. 

0. Butterwick, '12 was in Harris- 
burg Monday. 

Landis Klinger, '13 spent Thursday 
evening in Lebanon. 

Edna Yarkers, '13, took a flying 
trip to Lebanon Saturday. 

0. T. Ehrhart, '11, was in Lebanon 
Saturday. 

Prof. Shenk made an address at the 
anniversary exercises of the C. E. 
society at Avon, Pa., Sunday night, 
May 14. 

H. Raymond Bowers, Lemoyne, Pa., 
spent Sunday with his cousins, C. F. 
Harnish, '12 and L. B. Harnish, 
'14. 

Leray Harnish, '14 and Helen 
Brightbill spent Sunday at Lt. Gretna. 

A. H. Weigel, 13, was entertained 
by J. W. Ischy, '12, Lebanon, 
Wednesday night. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting Sunday afternoon was 
a continuation of the life of Alice 
Freeman Palmer. The first years of 
her married life were carefully de- 
scribed. During this time she was 
abroad several times, held the position 
of deanship of Ladies in a Chicago 
school and for nine years was presi- 
dent of the society, which later formed 
RadcUfYe College. Grace Smith was 
the leader. 



Supper by Art Department* 

The art department gave a supper 
Saturday evening for the purpose of 
raising funds to purchase some neces- 
sary equipment for the department. 
The room was decorated with flowers 
and lighted by Japanese lanterns. 
They were well patronized and dis- 
posed of all of their provisions. 



President Returns 

President Keisterhas returned from 
a very pleasant trip to the West. 
His efforts were more successful than 
was anticipated, since he secured some 
splendid financial assistance which will 
make the close of this year as splendid 
as the last. 



jCebanon Valley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Groicp System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

ZRev. jCawrence Jfeister, SPres. 
jfnnville, fPa. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

TheJournal PublishingCo. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 
826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 

Who made a home run ? No one. 
But you will if you select your Bails, 
Bats and Gloves From SPESSARD'S 
carefully selected stock of Baseball 
goods. . 

H. E. SPESSARD'S BOOKSTORE 

Journal Building ANNVILLE, PA. 

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FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward "90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

CFull line of College Post Cards 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

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COMPANY 

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the World 

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COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume II. flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, IWay 23, 1911 Jio. 33 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Lebanon Valley De- 
feats Millersville 

ADMINISTERS FIRST DEFEAT IN 
SEVERAL YEARS 

The strong Millersville State Nor- 
mal School ball tossers arrived here 
on Saturday morning with every ex- 
pectation of running away with a vic- 
tory over Lebanon Valley. But lo! 
imagine their surprise and mortifica- 
tion, when they discovered the score 
to be 9-1 in L. V's favor after the 
dust of battle had cleared away. 
This is the first time in four games 
that we scored on Millersville, which 
makes the victory more brilliant. 

L. V. was right there with the 
stick and got hits when they meant 
runs. Lehman got in another of his 
"drei-sockers" in the fifth inning. 
Loser and Carmany starred at bat. 
Lehman and Lyter played a great field- 
ing game. Lehman speared several 
line drives, for one of which he had 
to send in a "hurry-up" call for his 
aeroplane in order to reach it. Loser 
covered a lot of ground in center and 
made several pretty catches. Little 
pitched tip-top ball, only passing one 
man and allowing four hits. He 
struck out seven of the down-state 
sluggers. Not satisfied with this the 
110-pound prince of the mound added 
two healthy swats to his credit. 

Weller was not in his usual good 
form and was relieved in the fifth by 
Skiles, who was unable to stop the 
hits and the score began to roll up 
faster than ever. During his short 
stay in the box Weller hit one, gave 
two passes to first base, and was 
found for six hits. Skiles passed one 
and was also found for a like number 
of hits. 

The game was exciting to the finish 
and good support was given to all the 



pitchers. The score : 



MILLERSVILLE S. N. S. 



Burke 3b 


1 





4 


1 





Arthur lb 








10 








Snyder If 





2 











Zei linger rf 








1 





1 


Sharkey cf 





1 











Skiles ss p 








1 


1 





Stroup 2b 








2 


5 


1 


Hall c 





1 


6 


1 





Weller p ss 











1 





Totals 


1 


4 


24 


9 


2 


LEBANON VALLEY 








R. 


H. 


O. 


A. 


E. 


Miller c 


1 


1 


7 


2 





J. Lyter 3b 








4 


1 





Lehman lb 


1 


2 


12 








Harnish rf 


1 














Smith, 2b 


2 


1 


1 


3 





Loser cf 


2 


3 


3 





1 


Carmany ss 


2 


2 





2 


1 


Little p 





2 





2 


1 


Young If 





1 











Totals 


9 12 


27 


10 


3 


Lebanon Valley 


3 1 2 3 x 


-9 


Millersville N. S. 


000100000 


-1 



Albright Saturday 

The varsity will play Albright 
Saturday afternoon at 2:45 p. m. 
This game has been hastily arranged 
to take the place of the one that was 
prevented by rain April 22. The team 
is in splendid condition and will give 
our opponents "the time of their 
lives." This will be the big game of 
the season upon our field. Little will 
doubtless be at his best. Come, one 
and all, and let yourselves be heard 

Base Ball Bingles 

Gee, if Little were big!. 

Johnny had a "drei-socker. " 

The machinery worked like a charm. 

With Johnny a hit is almost as 
good as a mile. 

Lyter plays around third like a big 
leaguer. 

Smith has had only three errors this 
season. 

(Continued On pa^e 2) 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, 23, 6 p. m. — Prayer 
Meeting; 8 p. m.— Senior Recital, 
Edith Alice Gingrich. 

Wednesday 24, 7 p. m.— Mathema- 
tical Round " Table, Mathematics 
Room. 

Thursday 25, 8 p. m.- -Senior Reci- 
tal, Ora B. Bachman. 

Friday 23, 7 :15— Societies. 

Saturday 27, 2:45 p. m. —Varsity 
vs. Albright. 

Sunday 28, 1 p. m. Y. M. C. A. 
Monday 29, and Tuesday 30, Holi- 
days. 

Wednesday 31, 8 a. rn.— Semester 
Exams begin. 

Exercises of Com- 
mencement Week 

Friday, June 2—8 p. m. President's 
Reception to Senior Class. 

Saturday, June 3— 7 :45 p. m. Aca- 
demy Commencement. 

Sunday, June 4— 10:30 a. m. 
Baccalaureate Sermon by President 
Keister. 6 p. m. Union Campus 
Praise Service. 7:30 p. m. Annual 
Address before the Christian Associa- 
tions. 

Monday, June 5—12 to 5 p. m. Art 
Exhibit in New Studio. 8 p. rr. 
Exercises by the Graduating Class Con- 
servatory of Music and School of Ora- 
tory. 

Tuesday, June 6—9 a. m. Annual 
Meeting of Board of Trustees. 2 p. 
m. Class Day Exercises. 2 to 5 p. m. 
Art Exhibit. 7:30 p. m. Junior Ora- 
torical Contest. 

Wednesday, June 7— 10 a. ni. Forty- 
fifth Annual Commencement. Orator, 
Hon. Franklin Spencer Edmonds, of 
Philadelphia. Subject: "Leadership 
in a Democracy." Conferring De- 
grees. 12 m. Annual Alumni Dinner 
and Re-union. 1 to 3 p. m. Art 
Ehxibit. 7:15 p. m. Dramatic and 
Musical Entertainment. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College flecus 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, '12 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

OLA.IR F. HARNISH, '12 
JOHN W. ISCHY, '12 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '12 
EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 
AMOS H. WEIGLE, '13 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

V. D. MULHOLLEN, '13, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 
JOHN E. SHERK '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 c(s. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to V. D. Mulhollen, Box — , all 
other matter to Room 19, Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



The Close at Hand 

There remain loss than two weeks 
of our college year plus the events of 
commencement week. That means 
that this is the last week before 
' ' finals"begin in earnest. The year is 
rapidly drawing to a close and in this 
race, as well as others, much depends 
upon the finish. We cannot count the 
year an unqualified success unless we 
end up the year's work as brilliantly 
as we began it last September. We 
realize ihat the time of year is like- 
wise at hand when work seems to be an 
unnecessary burden and when our in- 
clinations would lead us out under the 
shade of the trees there to repose in 
quiet comfort. Social matters are 
also present to make an extra demand 
upon our time. But let us not forget 
entirely that campus work does not' 
give us the kind of credit that we de- 
sire at this season. Our social de- 
mands can be postponed rn anticipation 
of the coming vacation, and with a 
little extra effort we can endure the 
tremendous heat which the weather 
man is seeing fit to shower upon us. 

This is our last week for actual class 
work and for refreshing our memories 
with the knowledge that we have al- 
ready forgotten but which we must 
needs know when the Profs, have their 
say. Let this remind you that next 



week you will be called uuon to ac- 
count for your year's work. No 
matter what ycu have done throughout 
the year, whether you have studied or 
not, now is the time to hustle around 
and make the finish commensurate 
with your ability. Let not the result 
be less than your best. 

The Seniors, no doubt, have al- 
most completed their last ' 'quizzes" 
and will soon leave the college for 
good. Their days are few and doubt- 
less they will need the intervening 
time to rest from their arduous labors, 
preparatory to their final exercises. 

Regular examinations will be held 
next Wednesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day. The faculty, no doubt, have rea- 
lized the needs of some fcr a little 
more "cramming" and have decided to 
give us Monday and Tuesday to do it. 
But Tuesday is a holiday which we 
may have to celebrate. Then for the 
exams. Let each try to do himself 
justice and complete the year to his 
own and his Professors' satisfaction. 

Tennis Tournament 

at Annville 

LEBANON VALLEY TENNIS LEAG- 
UE HERSHEY VERSUS ANNVILLE 

The Annville team of the Leban n 
Valley Tennis League opened the season 
at home with Hershey and defeated 
them in both doubles and singles. 

For the home team Ellis and Saylor 
defeated Marquet and Graeff, of 
Hershey. Score 6-1, 6-2. In singles 
Kreider defeated Groeff, of Kershey 
by the score of 5-7, 6-1, 6-0. This 
was the first of twenty tournaments 
to be played by the Annville team this 
summer. Ten of these are to be played 
at home. 

There are six teams, Hershey, 
Myerstown, Hummelstown, Lebanon, 
Sinking Springs, and Annville, repre- 
sented in the League. The North 
American has presented a cup to be 
given as a trophy to the winner 

Next Saturday, May 27, Annville 
plays Sinking Springs at home and 
the boy3 hope for a victory. 

The Annville team is almost en- 
tirely composed of Lebanon Valley 
students and the boys play their games 
on the college courts. 



L. V. Academy 9 vs Lebanon 
HighO 

The Academy clearly showed its 
superiority over the Lebanon High 
School team by defeating them 9 to 0. 
The Academy boys played together 



from the start and 


the way they hit 


the ball made it necessary 


for Lebanon 


High to put a second pitcner in the 


box. This is the 


third 


game with 


Lebanon High and 


the boys are con- 


fident of winning 


three 


out of four 


games. The score 






HIGH SCHOOL 




R. 


H. O. A. E. 


Walters cf 





2 


K.H'ow 3b 





3 2 


E. Light If 





2 10 1 


A. H'ow ss 





2 4 1 


P'schke lb 





18 10 


Bowman c 





8 3 


L. Light rf 





10 


Spangler 2b 





14 


McG'ern p 





3 


Clark lb 





2 


Totals 





3 27 14 6 


LEBANON VALLEY ACADEMY 




R. 


H. O. A. E. 


Dunlap 3h 


1 


2 13 


Kreider ss 





110 1 


H. Light p 


3 


3 2 3 


M. Light c 





I 15 2 


Eby cf 


1 


110 


Long 2b 


2 


110 


Denlinger rf 


1 


10 


Meyer lb 





6 


B. Light If 


1 


10 


Total 


9 


11 27 8 1 


High School 


00000000 0-0 



Academy 1 5 1 1 1-9 

Base Ball Bingles 

Continued from page 1 

Seven Miller3villian split the air, 
only one got an excursion to first and 
a quadruple accidently "put them 
where they ain't. ' ' 

The varsity showed us the best game 
for three years. 

This ;s but a promise of what they'll 
do if the student body gives them the 
support they deserve. 

Don't root when they win and squeal 
when they lose unless you are anxious 
to reveal your natural traits. 

Next, a triplet with Albright. 

Everybody ginger up to take the 
series. 

Don't blame the Head for dyspepsia, 
when the stomach isn't perform- 
ing its proper functions. 

Varsity, Academy and Tennis team, 
these three ! 

Saturday must have been L. V. Day 
in Athletics. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS 





WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


00 


Science d 
Mathematics a2 
English '■'> 
German 2 
Greek 2 
Chemistry 1 


English 1 
English b 
Mathematics 5 
Greek lc 


Latin a 
German 1 
Latin 4 
English 8 


o 


English d 
Latin 3 
Latin 1 


Mathematics d 
Physics 1 
Economics 2 
Bible 1 


Mathematics c 
Mathematics 2 
Greek lb 




German b 
French I 
English 2 
German 3 


German a 
Biology la 


Latin b 
Greek 2 
Greek 1 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 

Vocal Duet, Evelyn Weidman, 
Naomi Ely; Current Events, Lillian 
Hawk; Parody, Edith Lehman; Piano 
Solo, Anna Fry: Paper, Myrle Behney ; 
Reading, Carrie Light; Instrumental 
Solo, Susie Schell. 

KALOZETEAN 

Current Events, Edgar Landis; 
Reading, Carl Schmidt; Clarinet Solo, 
Avon Light; Essay, John Lyter; Ex- 
tempore Quartette, Gibble, Long, 
Shearer, Hayes; Quotations. 



Entertainment of Sensors 

The Philos will entertain the mem- 
bers of the Senior class Fiiday night 
May 26. The program : 

Greetings to 1911, V. D. Mulhollen; 
Reading, A. H. Weigle; Pennsylvania 
Dutch Impressions of the Class of 1911, 
T. [J. Leibold; Parody 1911, Olivef 
Butterwick; Quartette, Smith, Rodes, 
Klinger, Anderson ; Prophecy, G. A. 
Richie; Farewell to 1911, Paul Loser; 
Living Thoughts, Editor. 



Y. W. C. A. 

On Sunday afternoon the Y. W. C. 
A. completed the study of the life of 
Alice Freeman Palmer. Miss Clip- 
pinger led the meating and discussed 
the last years of Mrs. Palmer life and 
her death. 

The study of this noble woman's 
career has been an inspiration to the 
association girls. Mrs. Palmer is a 
splendid example of one who has sur- 
mounted the greatest difficulties and 
raised herself to a position where she 
could lead a life of the most useful- 
ness. Her life was a beautiful one of 
-ervice for others. 



Baseball— Alumni Varsity 

We notice that manager Brunner 
has scheduled a game between the 
varsity and the Alumni on Wednes- 
day, June 7. This game is intended 
to arouse the interest in the college 
amongst its graduates which we so 
much need. Manager Brunner has a 
splendid team upon the field this season 
and he is prepared to "trim" those 
who have gone before Now, 
"Grads, "be up and doing, and be on 
hand during commencement week and 
bring the best team you have and 
make this the best game of the season- 
abounding in enthusiasm and interest 
in yo'jr Alma Mater. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The mee ing Sunday afternoon was 
addressed by P. R. Koontz. He spoke 
upon the subject." Vacation," scrip- 
ture lesson taken from Phillipians 4. 
The leader gave us an excellent talk 
upon the obligations of Christian Work 
during the vacation season. 



B 



SEPIIPY 



DAYTON, O, 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy" or 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, 'leaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
single students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 
Km further information or Catalogue-Bulletin, 
Address the President, 

J. P. LANDIS 

or .1. K FOUT 

Business Manager 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
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PHILADELPHIA 



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Are the largest 
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IF YOU 



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ter es t-* 
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Athletic Sport you 
should have a copy 
of the Spalding 
Catalogue. It's a 
complete encyclo- 
pedia o f What's 
New in Sport and 
is sent free on 
request. 



A. G Spalding & Bro. 

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L $100 Typewriter $32.50 



Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year,s guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase Iheir efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 
STEPHEN HUBERTIS 

Book Binder 

320 Market St., HARRISBUR.G* PA. 

Magazines and College Books 
Rebound. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



The Senior Oratory Recitals 

The Senior Oratory Recitals which 
were given last week were both of a 
very high order, showing not only 
thoro, painstaking preparation for 
these particular events, but conscien- 
tious, well-directed work during the 
course, and marked ability on the part 
of the readers. Both performances 
were most heartily received and 
thoroly enjoyed by the full house which 
greeted each. The long and difficult 
programs were presented without a 
break to mar them. 

Miss Verda Snyder's reading of 
Dickens' story, "The Christmas 
Carol," was thoroly enjoyed. Her 
impersonation of Scrooge and the 
different characters showed discrimina- 
tion and versatility. She was assisted 
by Mr. Charles Kimmel, Basso, and 
Mr. Fred Light, Violinist, both of 
Lebanon. 

Mrs. Hockenbury's reading of 
"Rebecca of Sunnybro^k Farm," by 
Kate Douglas Wiggin, was also en- 
joyed by all. She presented Rebecca 
with great sweetness and all the char- 
acters in the development of the story 
were well suggested. She held the 
'audience with ease. 

Miss Estelle Butler, Contralto, of 
Carlisle, a former class-mate assisted 
her with three songs ; Miss Meda Diehm 
accompanist. 

These were the last of the recitals 
given by the department, Mr. lschy's 
recital of "Seven Oaks" preceding. 

It was evident to all who attended 
these recitals that Miss Adams' work 
as teacher of Oratory is bringing 
splendid results, for much of the suc- 
cess of these performances was due 
to the superior instruction which she 
is imparting to her classes. 



jC eh an on fyalley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art^ Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
jCawrence Jfeister, ZPres. 



Have Your Printing Done by 

TheJournal Publishing Co. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Of Milwaukee, Wis. 



Who made a home run '? No one. 
But you will if you select .your Balls, 
Bats and Cloves From SPESSARD S 
carefully selected stock of Baseball 
goods. 

H. E. SPESSARD'S BOOKSTORE 

Journal Building ANNVILLE, PA. 



Jlmurilk national Bank 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoe» 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

£\ Full line of College Post Cards 
M I Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 

Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE, PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
COMPANY 

The Largest College Engraving House in 
the World 

Commencement Invitations 
Class Day Programs and 
Class Pins 



Dance Progrms 
and 

Invitations 
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Leather Dance 
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Fraternity 
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Wedding Invitations and Calling Cards 
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Represented at L. V. C. by 
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Printing and Developing for Amateurs 

HARPEL'S ART STORE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Learn Wireless & R. R. Telegraphy 

Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account oi 
s-liour law and extensive "wireless"' develop- 
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Telegraph Officials and positively place all stu- 
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la., Columbia, 8. C, Portland, Ore. 

Cfie Electric City 
Engraving £o. 

The largest specialists in 
^-•College Kngravings in the 
country. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

Rev. A. A. Long, D. D., Pastor of 
First Church, Altoona, was toast- 
master at the Banquet of the Alumni 
of Bonebrake Theological Seminary 
two weeks ago. 

President W. G. Clippinger, '99, 
delivered the address to the graduates 
of Bonebrake Theological Seminary. 

President B. F. Daugherty of West- 
fielJ College, attended a meeting of the 
Board of Education in Dayton, Ohio. 

John R. Geyer, '98, of Harrisburg, 
visited friends here on Wednesday. 



Capital - - $100,000.00 
Surplus and Undi- 
vided Profits 122,000.00 
Deposits - - 400,000.00 
Uesources - 680,000.00 



3 Per Cent. Paid on Special Deposits 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

%, SCHOOL of VV 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Cataloflue. TROY, N.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Volume II. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, JWay 30, 1911 No. 34 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



L. V. 3-Albright4 

In one of the most exciting games 
of the season Albright defeated 
Lebanon Valley by the score of 4—3. 

It was a pitchers battle supreme. 
Albright by taking advantage of our 
loose playing in the first two innings 
scored three of their four runs. 

Aft^r the second inning the up- 
holders of the blue and white settled 
down and showed the grand stand seven 
innings of real base ball, the like of 
which hadn't been seen on our athletic 
field for many moons. For the first 
six innings Weaver held Lebanon 
Valley hitless and retired the boys in 
one, two, three fashion. In the 
seventh inning we got our first hit, 
but could not make it count. 

In the ninth Dunlap opened up by 
getting to first on Hindel's error. 
Miller was next up and smashed out a 
two bagger, scoring Dunlap from first. 
The wiry little Irishamn gained the 
plate by a pretty slide. Lyter 
grounded to pitcher and was safe at 
first When Miller was caught at third. 
Lehman was next up smashed out a 
pretty triple scoring Lyter. Harnish 
scored Lehman by an infield hit. 
Smith flew out to Kelchner. Loser 
struck out. 

The fielding was good. Lyter 
showed a pretty piece of headwork 
when he held a man on third and threw 
the runner out at first by fielding a 
slow bunt. Dunlap made a sensational 
catch of a line drive in the eighth. 

Foltz the first man up for Albright 
obtained a free pass to first: was 
advanced to second by Kerner's 
out. Smoyer singled. Foltz scored 
on a passed ball. Kelchner flew out 
to Lehman. In the second Shuman 
singled and scored on Weaver's and 
Yost's outs. Zerbe singled and scored 
on Hummel's triple. Foltz ended 
the inning by flying out to Young. 



Albright scored their fourth run in 
the fourth, Shuman drew a pass. 
Weaver got to first on an error. Yost 
struck ont. Zerbe scored Shuman 
when he was safe on first by an 
error. The scores 

ALBRIGHT 





R. 


H. 


O. A. 


E. 


Foltz c 







5 1 


1 


Kerner 3b 





1 


2 





Smoyer ss 








2 6 





Kelchner 2b 


1 





3 2 





Shuman rf 





1 








Weaver p 








4 





Yost cf 














Zerby lb 


1 


1 


13 





Hummel If 


1 


2 


2 





Hindle rf 











1 


lotal 




4 


5 27 13 2 


LEBANON VALLEY 






R. 


H. O. A. 


E. 


Miller c 





1 


5 2 





J. Lyter 3b 


1 





2 2 





Lehman lb 


1 


2 


12 2 


1 


Harnish rf 





1 


1 


1 


Smith, 2b 








1 2 





Loser cf 








1 





Carmany ss 





1 


3 2 


1 


Little p 








1 2 


1 


Young If 








1 





Dunlap If 


1 





1 





Totals 


a 


5 


27 13 


4 


Lebanon Valley 


000000003 


-3 


Albright 


120100000 


-4 



Two base hits— Miller; Three base 
hits— Lehman; Hummel: Struck out, 
by Little— 5; by Weaver— 4, Bases on 
balls, off Little— 2. Time 1:45. 
Umpire, Barnhart. 



New U. B. Church 

The newly purchased site at the 
corner of Main Street and College 
Avenue has been cleared and the work 
of building the new edifice has begun. 
The work of excavation is almost com- 
pleted. Upon the site will be built 
an imposing structure. 

Prof. C. B. Pennypacker, principal 
of York High School, will make the 
address before the Christian associa- 
tions Sunday evening June, 4. 



Calendar. 

Monday, 29— Holiday. 

Tuesday, 30— Decoration Day— Holi- 
day. Varsity vs. Albright at Myers- 
town (Two games) 10 a. m. and 2 p. 
m. 

Wednesday, 31— Semester examina- 
tions begin. 

Thursday, June 1— Examinations ; 
8 p. m., Senior Recital, Miss Ora B, 
Bachman. 

Friday, 2 — Examinations end. 

6:30 Societies. 

Saturday 3 — 8 p. m. Academy Com- 
mencement. 

Sunday 4—10 :30 a. m. Baccalaureate 
Sermon, President Keister. 6 p. m. 
Union Campus Praise Service. 7:30 
p. m. Christian Associations. 

Monday, 5— Art Exhibit. 8:p. m. 
Conservatory Commencement. 

Tuesday, 6—9 a. m. meeting of 
Board of Trustees. 2 p. m. Class 
Day. 7:30 p. m. Junior Oratorical 
contest. 

Wednesday, 7—10 a. m. , 44th Com- 
mencement; 12:00, Alumni Dinner 
and Reunion. 

Botany Class at Penryn 

Prof. Derickson took the class in 
Botany upon a most interesting ex- 
pedition Saturday the 20th. They left 
Annville at 6:30 in the morning, and 
proceeded over the Cornwall Railroad 
to Miner's Village. From thence they 
tramped over mountains and through 
swamps gathering up many interesting 
specimens, and arrived at Penryn Park 
at noon. The party returned at 2 :15 
in time to see the game. Those com- 
posing the party: Prof. S. H. 
Derickson, Samuel O. Grimm, Artus 
O. Kauffman, Harry Charlton, Chas. 
Arndt, G. A. Richie, H. E. Snavely, 
IvanRessler, George Williams, Reu- 
ben Williams, Claude Reddick, Leray 
B. Harnish, Russel Weidler, Edward 
Mutch. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fie&us 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, '12 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

CLAIR P. HARNISH, '12 
JOHN W. ISCHY, '12 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
IVAN, L. RESSLER, '12 
EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 
AMOS H. WEIGLE, '13 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

V. D. MULHOLLEN, '13, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

JOHN B. LYTER '14 
JOHN E. SHERK '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies j cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 
to V. D. Mulhollen, Box — , all 
' other matter to Room 19, Adminis- 
tration Building- Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Notice 

The time has come when our edij 
torial duties for the year are almost 
over. The last number of the 
"News" will be issued several days 
late in order that all the Commence- 
ment news can be secured. Com- 
mencement day comes next Wednesday 
and it is our purpose to issue the Com- 
mencement number as soon as possible 
after the close of the exercises at 
noon on Wednesday, June 7. 



The New Chapel 

The new Chapel ? Well, the Alumni 
of Lebanon Valley College that come 
back for commencement this year will 
think it is a new chapel. It has been 
noticed of late that this particular 
part of the college possessions was 
some-wbat out of harmony with the 
general surroundings, and had a ten- 
dency to dispel the good impressions 
which the group of handsome college 
buildings and the beautiful campus 
created. It is particularly important 
that this auditorium should make an 
attractive appearance, for here practi- 
cally all the public performances of the 
school year are given, and strangers 
attending these events naturally form 
their opinion of the college from the 
impressions which they receive of 
Engle Conservatory. The Woman's 
Board which has been doing so much to 



improve conditions about the col- 
lege has been devoting all its 
energies to the improvements to the 
campus, undertaken last year. 
Consequently they could not take 
up this matter as they would, un- 
doubtedly, otherwise have done. 
Not only was the atmosphere of the 
place "out of harmony" but every 
time there was any occasion for 
decorating the hall, the committee in 
charge must needs spend a tremendous 
amount of time and energy in over- 
coming the difficulties which the pecu- 
liar arrangement of the hall presented. 

Now all this will be obviated. 
Some time ago an entertainment was 
given under the direction of Professors 
Adams and Sheldon, to raise funds in 
order to purchase window shades, etc., 
for the chapel. These funds were 
turned over to the Woman's Board, 
and it was found that after the desired 
purchase had been made there still 
remained a balance of almost twenty- 
five dollars in the treasury. Now it 
seems that it is against the constitu- 
tion and by-laws of this organization 
to have any money lying idle on their 
hands when it might be invested to 
good advantage in needed improve- 
ments. So with this small amount a 
a nest -egg, they began to plan some 
improvements to the (hapel which 
would be permanent, and upon 
receiving a promise of co-operation 
from Miss Adam proceeded at once to 
carry their plan into effect. Miss 
Adams drew the plans of the arches to 
be erected, and submitted them to 
Mrs. Keister who is president of the 
Woman's Board. The plans were ap- 
proved and the arches are already well 
under way toward completion. The 
net proceeds realized from the "Ora- 
tory Dramatics," to be given under 
Miss Adams' direction on^the evening 
of June seventh, will be contributed 
to this fund, and it is hoped will 
almost, if not entirely, pay off all 
debts incurred in making these im- 
provements. 

As before stated this will mean a 
great change in the appearance of the 
chapel. Not only will it make the 
place more beautiful and make it 
more suitable for holding the many 
public exercises incident to college 
work, but we believe the beautifying of 
the chapel will have a tendency to pro- 



duce a spirit of greater reverence, on 
the part of the students at the daily 
chapel exercises. And when once the 
walls have been beautified with ap- 
propriate paintings, which no doubt 
the different classes and organizations 
of the college will in time provide, we 
shall have a chapel whose appearance 
will be a credit to the institution of 
which it is a part. 

In the mean time it should be re- 
membered that it is largely due to the 
efforts of Miss Adam3 that these im- 
provements have been made possible. 
Not only was it largely thru her in- 
fluence that the Woman's Board under- 
took the work, but she is now devoting 
every minute of available time to 
training the participants in the "Ora- 
tory Dramatics." The oratory stu- 
dents will also be assisted on this oc- 
casion by the music students, and it is 
confidently expected that this will be 
the greatest success of the school 
year. 

Prof.H.H.Baish, W 
Re-elected Supt. 
Altoona Schools 

By an unaminous vote of the Altoona 
school board yesterday afternoon the 
present superintendent of schools, 
Prof. Henry H. Baish, was re-elected 
to another term of three years at the 
same salary, $?,400 per year. By 
actual time the calling of the roll and 
the election of the superintendent took 
exactly one minute and ten seconds. 

The election of Superintendent Baish 
as head of the city schools for 
another term marks an epoch in the 
life of a man whose rise in educa- 
tional lines has been rapid. About 
sixteen years ago, he began his teach- 
ing career in this city as one of the in- 
structors in the city schools. Soon 
afterwards he left the city and com- 
pleted a course at the Cumberland 
Valley State Normal school and re- 
turned to Altoona for four years. He 
then completed a classical course at 
the Lebanon Valley college, and re- 
turned to this city for another teaching 
period of seven years. He served as 
instructor here in 1908, when he was 
elected to the position of superinten- 
dent of the Altoona schools. 



COLLEGE ^N"E W S 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Just Because, Sedic Rine ; Quartette, 
C. C. Smith, Guy Wingerd, Titus 
Leibold, Maurice Leister; My English 
Grades, N. B. S. Thomas; Debate: 
Resolved, that a crab is a bug; Affir- 
mative, C. F. Harnish, A H. 
Weigle; Negative, L. B. Harnish, 
P. R. Roberts; When I'm an old 
Alumnus, V. D. Mulhollen; Living 
Thoughts, Editor 

The following is a true report of 
moneys received, ana spent, for now 
uniforms for the college base ball 
team this spring : 

RECEIVED 

President L. Keister $10.00 

Dr. and Mrs. G. A. Gerberich ..10.00 

Mrs. J. S. Mills 14.50 

Alfred K. Mills ..14.75 

J. C. Strock .5.00 

Hon. W. H. Ulricb .... 5.00 

Thomas Miller ....1.00 

A, S. Kreider.... ..2.00 

Prof. H. H. Baish . ... ..2.00 

Dr. M. W. Brunner .... ... .1.00 

Miss Ora M. Harnish .... ... .3.00 

Total 68.25 
PAID OUT 
To the Spalding agent, for ten un- 

forms. .$67.50 

For expressage on same .75 

Total 68.25 

Commenting on the above report, I 
would say I wrote to a considerable 
number of the alumni for help in this 
matter. A number, interested in 
other matters concerning the college, 
were not asked to help in this. In 
only one case did I receive a reply 
abruptly refusing aid. This was from 
a man who benefited greatly from the 
college in his student days. In many 
cases I received no replies at all. 

It is a curious commentary that a 
number of the men who made the most 
noise about athletics, in their student 
days, did not as much as answer the 
letters sent them appealing for money. 

In talking to a number of the 
alumni concerning the athletic situa- 
tion, it was the consensus of opinion 
that the best results could be obtained 
by having a combined board, com- 
posed of alumni, faculty and student 
members in control of all athletics in 
the college, with power to displace 
either captains or managers should the 
occasion, in the mind of such a board, 



demand. With such a board in control, 
money would not be spent recklessly, 
and no man would keep a place on any 
team, except he earned the place by 
working for it. 

It would seem that first things ought 
to come fiist, and that the first thing 
any college administration ought to be 
concerned with would be the general 
financial and scholarly advancement of 
a college rather than the reckless ex- 
penditure of constituents money on 
athlectis or any other lesser branch of 
college activity. .Lebanon Valley has 
suffered too much from the latter 
policy ; in the past. 

The base ball team this year is com- 
posed of college students, and not 
professional athletes. Nothing but 
good words can be said of the excellent 
work the team has done this spring. 

ALFRED K. MILLS, '04. 



Senior Recital by Miss Edith 
Gingrich 

The third of the recitals given by 
the graduating class in music was 
given Tuesday night, May 23 by Miss 
Edith A. Gingrich. Considering the 
fact that the night was disagreeable 
because of a down pour of rain, a 
splendid audience was present. The 
splendid rendition of the numbers on 
the program showed that they were 
prepared with the utmost care. The 
program was beautifully and excel- 
lently presented, commensurate wirh 
the well-known ability of the partici- 
pants. 

Miss Gingrich was assisted by E. 
A. Spessard, '11, who sang twn solos. 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



She was piesented many flowers 
and other gifts by her friends. 



Alumni 



Miss Helen Ethel Myers, '07, assis- 
tant librarian at the University of 
Chicago, is spending her vacation at 
her home at Mt Joy trying to recupe- 
rate her health which has been broken 
jdown by her arduous duties. 

Prof. Schlichter, '97, will be here 
for Commencement. 



Postponed 

Unfortunately it has been impossible 
to make the necessary arrangements 
with the organizations in Harrisburg 
to distribute the flowers which the 
members of the "Wild Flower Club" 
expected to send to the hospitals and 
mission stations of that city during 
the coming summer, so that any or- 
ganized effort in that direction will 
not be practicable this year. A delay 
in getting in touch with the right 
persons makes it impossible to properly 
organize the work before commence- 
ment. Arrangements will be made, 
however, so that next year the work 
may start promptly, and it is to be 
hoped that the in terest manifested in 
this work, by the students, will con- 
tinue until it can take some definite 
practical form. 

Do not forget the motto, "Sunshine 
enough for all," and remember, too, 
that there will be innumerable oppor- 
tunities to disseminate sunshine 
whether or not you are a member of an 
organization with that object in view. 



Items of Interest 



Rev. A. N. Horn, of Enola, was 
the guest of his daughter, Miss Clara, 
Friday. 

Two house parties are at Mt. 
Gretna and one at Valley Glen resting 
for the examinations that are to come. 

We're off to Myerstown to-morrow. 



jCehanon 7/alley 
College 



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Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
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Write for catalogue 

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Jtnnville, ZPa. 

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A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

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Represented at College 

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Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets* 
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rfS II Dericisoo r-Io 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 

COIiliEGE ]MEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume II. Annville, Pa., Thursday, June 8, 1911 ]Mo. 35 

Entered as second-class matter November u, 1910, at the po st office at Annville, Fa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 

COMMENCEMEN T EXER CISES A ND 

EVENTS OF T HE WEEK ATTRACT MANY 

Hon. Franklin Spencer Edmonds, of Philadelphia, Delivers the Address to the Graduat- 
ing Class on "Leadership in a Democracy" 



The forty-fifth annual commence- 
ment of Lebanon Valley College took 
place on Wednesday morning, June 7. 
The Honorable Franklin Spencer Ed- 
nronds, of Philadelphia, delivered the 
commencement address, his subject 
being, "Leadership in a Democracy." 
Mr. Edmonds is not only a fluent 
and forceful speaker, but his thoro 
knowledge of all phases of his subject 
and his broadness of that, make him 
not only an entertaining speaker but 
one who brings to his hearers some 
lesson of fundamental truth to cairy 
away with them. The graduating 
class expected great things from Mr. 
Edmonds, and they were not disap- 
pointed. . 

His subject is one that is of vital 
importance to America as a nation, 
and particularly to the men and women 
who are in American colleges pre- 
paring for leadership. He impressed 
upon the mind of his hearers the im- 
portance of taking seriously the oppor- 
tunities for becoming a leader among 
men, which a college course brings 
with it. As his first fundamental 
principal he insists that success con- 
sists in making one's self useful to 
his fellowmen, and that no one is 
successful who does not make society 
better by living in it. He showed 
that the American people demand cer- 
tain characteristics in their leaders, 
and two of the essential qualities are, 
"Positive Honesty," and Efficiency." 
These are things in which the Ame- 
rican people are advancing and they 
will not accept a man as their leader 
who does not possess them. The 



following area few sentences that are 
characteristic of the whole address : 
"The man who does a deed that will 
make him afraid of public opinion, 
makes of himself a slave." "If you 
would win, you must study your sub- 
ject as thoroly as, or more thoroly, 
than your opponent' "Go forth as a 
leader into the world just don't go 
forth to show your ignorance, don't 
play a game of which you know noth- 
ing." "Society is your problem, but 
your greatest problem is yourself. 
Do not take yourself for granted, if 
you do not fit into your place the 
trouble may be in you, and not in your 
place." "I urge you in your plan of 
life, that you will let the preaching 
of your daily life, speak to the 
world the things for which you 
should stand. " After the address 
the diolomas were awarded and the 
degree conferred by President Keister. 
The following received the degree of 
Bachelor of Acts : W. Brunner, 
O. T. Ehrhart, W. O. Ellis, F. L. 
Frost, P. M. Holdeman, A. 0. Kauff- 
rnan, f. R. Kennedy, P. R. Koontz, 
J. K. Lehman, J. E. Marshall, R. B. 
Saylor, W. C. Shoop, E. A. Spes- 
sard, L. L. Spessard, S. G. Ziegler 
and A. M. Lindsay. 

Senior Class Entertained 

On Friday evening, June 2, Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Keister entertained the 
Senior classes at the annual reception. 
The parlors and porches were taste- 
fully decorated with plants and flower. 
A white rose, the class flower of the 
Literary Senior Class, was given to 



each member of the class as a favor. 
Delicious refreshments were served. 
Besides the Senior classes, nearly 
every member of the faculty end a few 
other guests were present. 

Academy Commencement 

The third annual commencement of 
Lebanon Valley Academy was held 
Saturday evening, June the third. 
The chapel was decorated prettily with 
roses, pennants and crepe paper in 
green and white, their class colors. A 
large audience greeted the class. 
Each participant deserves praise for 
the program, which was as follows : 
Selection, Washington Band; Presi- 
dent's Address, Samuel B. Groh; Two 
Piano Duett, "March Heroique," 
Mary Spayd and Ruth E. Engle; class 
History, Ruth V. Engle: Eulogy, 
Horace Mann. Ruth E. Engle; Trom- 
bone Solo, Harry M. Bender ; Reading, 
"Night Run of the Overland, "Helen 
Brightbill; Presentation, LaRene 
Engle; Vocal Duett, Helen Brightbill 
and Mary Spayd; Presentation of 
Diplomas by E. E. McCurdy; class 
song. Helen Brightbill received the 
scholarship. The class roll is as 
follows: Helen E. Brightbill, Harry 
M. Bender. LaRene R. Engle, Ruth 
E. Engle, Ruth V. Engle. Samuel 
B. Groh, Mary A. Spayd. 



The Baccalaureate Sermon 

President Keister preached a strong 
sermon to the graduating class and 
their friends, choosing for his subject, 
"How Joseph Became Prime 
Minister." Taking the story of 




2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Joseph's life he presented it in such a 
way, that his listeners, however con- 
versant they may have been with the 
story, could not fail to see in it, new 
meaning and new truths, of which 
they had never before had any intima- 
tion. In his usual clear and logical 
way he demonstrated that the princi- 
ples which made for greatness in the 
life of Joseph are the same principles 
that make for greatness in the life of 
any young man today. He empha- 
sized the fact that there are two ele- 
ments in life, the human and the 
divine, and that there are four methods 
of life: we may exalt the human to 
the exclusion of the divine; we may 
exalt the divine to the exclusion of the 
human; we may exalt both subordina- 
ting the divine to the human; we may 
exalt both subordinating the human 
to the divine. The last method is the 
one that brings greatness, the one 
that Joseph and all great and successful 
men followed. He also said that 
Joseph had demonstrated that it is 
not the problem of life to get a living 
or to gain a great name, but to build 
true characters and true manhood. 
The President's closing words to the 
class were full of inspiration and 
encouragement, emphasizing the fact 
that true nobility and greatness are 
within the reach of all who aspire and 
strive for them. 

Union Campus Praise Service 

The Union Campus Praise Service 
was held Sunday June 4, at 6 p. m. 
under the trees on the Campus under 
the leadership of S. O. Grimm. He 
read from the 145th and 146th Psalms 
for a scripture lesson. There was a 
good number present, among which 
were the seniors and a number of the 
faculty. The meeting was given 
mostly to t e Seniors who gave their 
experience during their membership in 
the Y. M. C. A. and also left some 
advice and words of encouragement to 
the members who remain to continue 
the work next year. Several of the 
Alumni and members of the faculty 
gave inspiring talks. The meeting 
was full of interest, due some what, 
to the pleasant atmosphere and sur- 
roundings of the open air meeting. 

Address to Christian Associa- 
tions 

The annual address was delivered 



before the Christian Associations in 
the Engle Auditorium by Prof. C. B. 
Pennypacker. principal of the "Vork 
High School, Sunday evening, .lune 
4th. O. T. Ehrhart, '11, delivered 
the invocation and Dr. Keister read 
the scripture lesson and offered prayer. 
The choir, directed by Prof. Sheldon, 
rendered the music for the program 
which included two anthems. The 
offering of the evening will be devoted 
to sending young people to the summer 
conferences of the respective associa- 
tions. 

Prof. Pennypacker delivered a most, 
interesting address upon the subject: 
"Fundamentals in Religion." His 
address attracted much notice and at- 
tention because it was the expression 
of the speaker's breliefs told in un- 
varnished language. The speaker pre- 
sented the truth about religion as he 
was able to understand it from the 
laymen's point of view and not from 
that of the theologian Consequently, 
the address was very well received by 
the fair sized audience present When 
it was over, comments and differences 
of opinion were heard indicating that 
it had made an impression upon the 
hearers. 

We can give but a very brief sum - 
mary of the addiess: The fundamen- 
tals of religion are faith, hope and 
charity. We must not be Puritanic 
in our opinions about"religion, but in- 
stead, should enjoy our religion as 
much as anything in life. Religion 
is the expression of the true, of the 
good, of the highest ideals of human 
experience. Religion is based upon 
the brotherhood of man and the fath- 
erhood of God. It is useless for us to 
question the truths of the Bible or 
speculate whether sc.ence and the 
Bible agree, whether the world was 
made by God or according to the neb- 
ular hypothesis, or was created spon- 
taneously. "I love the Church for 
the work it has done and I hope that 
it shall ever increase in power and 
efficiency. ' ' 

In th« church is the ph ce for work 
and not out of it. But it is hard to 
get men into church The obstacle in 
the way being the method of the 
church which is man-made. Everyone 
confessing a desire to cease to do evil 
and to do well instead should be ad- 
milted to the church. Religion and 



education always hold on to the old 
the longest. The church fails when 
it ignores the questions of the daj . 
The Church is indifferent to intemper- 
ance and other institutions must take 
up the work. 

Love, or charity, and not fear, is 
the greatest impelling force in reli- 
gion. But many do not know the 
alphabet in charity. The Church fails 
to apply its action to practical ethics. 
The Church should aim to do the 
greatest good to the greatest number, 
but the Church is too largely con- 
trolled by worldly agencies. Through 
religious teachings we may find "the 
peace that passeth all understanding." 

Commencement of Conserva- 
tory And School of Oratory 

The annual exercises of the Con- 
servatory of Music were held Monday 
evening June, 5, at 8:00. In conjunc- 
tion with the graduates in Oratory a 
very creditable program was rendered. 
This was the first class graduating 
from the Oratory department. There 
were four graduates in music and three 
in oratory whose names will appear in 
the program. The program through- 
out was especially good. The num- 
bers rendered by the graduates in 
music were heavy, displaying in tech- 
nique and power of expression. The 
renditions by the graduates in oratory 
were as good as any we have heard 
this year. The program : 

Invocation; Scherzvo, Op. 31, Edith 
Alice Gingrich ; Silence, Nona Downey 
Hockenbury ; Concert Etude, Op. 36, 
Elizabeth May Meyer; Monalogue, 
entertaining a Neighbor's Child, Verda 
A. Snyder; Fantaisie, Op. 49, Ora 
Belle Bachman ; My Last Duchess, 
John Wesley Ischy; a Aven, Carnival, 
Op. 9— b Marche des "Davids- 
bundler, " Ruth C. Detweiler The. 
last number was the presentation of 
Diplomas by President Keister. 

Class Day 

The class exercises rendered on 
Tuesday afternoon were notaLle for 
originality and wit. The program was 
made up principally of three clever 
class songs and two class meetings, 
one representing the last one held in 
1911 and the other one held twenty 
five years later. The songs, both 
Continued on page 2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



3 



Lebanon Valley and Al- 
bright Divide Honors 

L. V.-7 Albright-3 

Lebanon Valley base ball team, 
accompanied by a large band of 
rooters, went to Myerstown on Memo- 
rial Day where they played two games 
with Albrignt. L. V. lost the morn- 
ing game by the score of two to one. 
The second game was turned into a 
brilliant victory by the score of seven 
to three. 

THE MORNING GAME 

Albright opened up in the first 
inning. Foltz hit to E. Miller and 
reached second on his overthrow to 
Lehman. Kerner advanced Foltz to 
third when he grounded out, E. Miller 
to Lehman. J. Kelchner tripled to left 
scoring Foltz. Smoyer and Shuman 
struck out. Albright got their second 
tally in the second when Weaver scored 
on two successive errors. 

During the remainder of the game 
Albright was not dangerous. Only 
four hits were netted from Little's 
delivery. Our "Muggsy" was there 
with the goods.. He struck out four 
of Albright's Sluggers. He did not 
give a single pass to first base. 

L. V. got their only run in the 
fourth on Miller's home run - He hit 
to deep right and the ball was lo3t in 
the tall grass and he had crossed 
the plate before the ball was fuund. 
L. V. gathered up three hits 
from Weaver. Sensational fielding 
spoiled several runs for both 
sides. Lehman starred at first 
base. Dunlap played a star game in 
the field for L. V. In the fourth he 
made a sensational throw from center 
to home catching a runner at the 
plate. The scoie : 

L. V. C. 

R. H. O. A.E. 

J. Miller, c 1 8 2 

Lyter, lb 1 2 

Zehman, lb 9 

E. Miller, ss. o 2 2 

Harnish, rf 2 1 

Smith, 3b 1 1 

Dunlap, of o 2 1 

Carmany, If. . 

Little, p o 1 1 

Totals 1 2 24 9 1 

ALBRIGHT. 

R. H. O. A.E. 
Foltz, cf 1 1 9 1 



Kremer, lb 1 1 

Moyer, ss 2 2 

J. Kelchner, 2b 1 2 3 

Shumon, rf 1 1 

Weaver, p 1 1 3 

C. Kelchner, cf 1 1 2 

Gerbe, lb 10 

Hummel, If 1 1 

Totals 2 6 27 10 

Lebanon Valley 10 0—1 

Albright llOOOOOOx— 2 

Two-base Hits, Lehman ; Three-base 
Hits, Loser; Home Runs, Lyter, J. 
Kelchner; Struck Out by I ittle 4; by 
Yost 2 ; by Weaver 2. Time 1 hour, 45 
minutes. Umpire Clemens. 



THE AFTERNOON GAME 
At 3 p. m. the defenders of the blue 
and the white commenced the battle 
well prepared, and Albright met its 
Waterloo. This time it was to the 
tune of 7 to 3. Little was upon the 
mound for the second game of the day 
and dealt out to his opponents curves 
and drops sufficient to break their 
backs. Their was nothing to it bui 
Lebanon Valley. Yost hsd to be taken 
out of the box and Weaver finished 
the game much against his inclinations. 
In both games Little gave Albright 
but ten hits. 

We got our first run in the fourth 
inning when E. Miller singled and was 
advanced to third en an error. He 
scored on Smith's out to center. In 
the sixth, L. V. scored two more runs. 
Lehman opened with a single. 
Miller got to base on an error ad- 
vancing Lehn an to third. Both scored 
when Harnish double to center. Smith 
singled, but no runs were scored. In 
the seventh we scored four more runs. 
Loser opened with a slashing three 
bagger. Little scored him with a 
single. A. Miller singled. Lyt*>r 
scored Miller and Little with a long 
home run. Lyter again lost the ball 
in the tall grass. Lehman, next up, 
hit a pretty two bagger but died on 
base. Yost was then replaced by 
Weaver from whom only one safe hit 
was made. 

Yost made a poor showing in the 
box and was hit all over the field. 
Little pitched the second game for 
Lebanon Valley and was stronger in 
this contest than in the morning game. 
Only three hits were gathered from 
him. 

Alright got two of the runs in the 



first inning when he reached first on 
an error. Kelchner drove him home 
with a homer. They scored another 
run in the ninth when Shuman singled, 
s'.ole second, and scored when Kolchner 
got on base on an error. 

Smith starred in the field for L. 
V., while the hitting honors were 
divided between Harnish, Loser, and 
Lyter. The score : 

L. V. C. 

R. H. O. A E. 

J. Miller, c 1 G 1 

Lyter, 3b 1 1 3 1 

Lehman, lb 1 2 17 1 

E. Miller, ss 2 1 1 4 1 

Harnish, r f 1 1 

Smith, 3b 4 

Dunlay, cf 2 1 

Loser, If... 1 3 

Little, p 1 2 1 3 

Totals 7 10 27 15 5 

ALBRIGHT. 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Foltz, cf 1 7 3 

Kerncer, lb 1 1 

Moyer, ss 1 3 3 

J. Kelchner, 2b 1 1 1 2 1 

Shuman, rf 1 1 1 01 

Weaver, p 1 1 

C. Kelchner, cf 3 1 

Yost, p 1 2 1 

Gerbe, lb 8 1 

Hummel, I f 2 

Totals 3 5 27 12 4 

Albright 20000000 1—3 

Lebanon Valley ..00010240 0—7 

Three-base Hits, J. Kelchner; Heme 
Runs, Miller; Struck Out, by Little 
6; by Weaver 7. Time 2 hours 5 
minutes. Umpire Clemens. 



L. V. 9 ; Alumni 1 

In the last game of the season 
Lebanon Valley defeated the Alumni 
in a listless game to the tune of 9-1. 
The Alumni had a galaxy of former 
stars and captains in their line-up, 
but were unable to find the exlusive pill 
shot over the pan by Little. Shaffer 
had their only hit on a Texas leaguer 
over third which should have been 
fielded. Stehman, Strock, Shaeffer 
and Koontz played classy ball for the 
Alumni , while Little and Lehman 
starred for the Varsity. Rutherford 
was hit hard and only the clever fielding 
behind him saved more runs from 
crossing the plate. Little did not 
have to exert himself during the game. 
In the tnird inning he struck out the 
side. Only twenty seven men faced 
Little in eight innings. Lehman con- 
tinued his hitting. He added a three 



4 



COLLEGE NEWS 



bagger and a home run to his credit. 
This brings him up to a total of two 
homers, six triples, two two baggers 
and four singles a total of fourteen 
hits in twelve games. He hit for a 
total of thirty four bases which puts 
him first in the precentage list of our 
batters. T! e score : 

LEBANON VALLEY 

R. H. 0. A. E. 
J. Lyter 3b 112 2 

Smith, 2b 2 1111 

Lehman lb 2 2 7 

Harnish rf i 1 1 0' 

P. Loser c 1 12 1 

Little p 10 

Dunlap ss 110 

E. Loser If 10 10 

Heffelfinger cf 110 



Totals 



9 7 24 5 1 



ALUMNI 



R.. H. O 













1 1 21 11 3 



Albert ss 
Strock 3b 
Stehman lb 
Shaffer 2o 
Plummer If 
Koontz c 
Arndt rf 
•T. Kreider cf 
M. Lehman cf 
Rutherford p 

Totals 

Lebanon Valley 3 1 2 3 x-9 
Alumni 1 0—1 

Two-base Hits, Shaffer; Home 
Runs, Lehman ; Left on Bases, Leh- 
man ; Struck Out bv Little twelve, by 
Rutherford fhe; Double Plays Dunlap 
to Lyter; First base on Balls off Little 
two; off Rutherford 3 Time 1:55. 
Umpire Guyer. 

Base Ball Summary 

The manager of the base ball team 
wishes to take this means to thank 
the fellows whoso nobly assisted him 
through such a successful season. 
That the season has been a success 
goes without saying. The team won 
six games, tied two and lost four. 
One of the defeats was received at the 
hands of York Tri-State and was a 
very creditable score. In one of the 
two which were tied we should have 
had a victory, but bad umpiring was 
the cause of the tie. In no game ex- 
cept the York Tri-State game has any 
team scored over five runs. Following 
is a summary of the batting and 
fielding records of the various players: 




Lyter .... Ga, ?f? 8 8* it 2 F - Berr y Firmer, '05, is here fo 

KK::::::::::::::::;::::: \\ ?1? 10 ? % \ commencement. 

Smith 11 7 6 9 26 2 

Duniay ..'.,.'.7.7.7.' 310 14 1 Miss Lillian Burkey, '03, Conserva- 

Carmany 10 9 5 20 15 11 . , , 

Young 3 o 2 i o o tory, has accepted a position as organist 

Loser 7 5 8 7 1 , . . .. 

Hummel e 2 4 4 s o and musical director in St. Jame's 

E. Miller 3 3 5483 

\. Miiiier 7 9 9 45 io o Lutheran Church, Lebanon, fa. 

kittle 11 7 S 5 16 5 

Totals ~ £ nm 8* 54 "I H " BaiSh ' ' 01 ' A,t0 ° na 58 ber<? 3t - 

From the above summary one will tendin S meeting of Trustee Board, 

see that Harnish leads in the number Prof * Baisb is an Alumni trustee. He 

of hits, while Carman;/ leads in run has been re - e, ected superintendent of 

getting. Lyter excelled in base run- tne A,toona Publ 'c Schools, 

ning throughout the season. Lehman F - A - Rutherford, '10, and F. E. 

had the largest number of long hits Shaffer, '10, medical students at Johns 

to his credit. Among his twelve hits Hopkins, were here during commence- 

he had one home run, five trip'es and ment. 

two doubles. A. Miller and Lyter Deleth Weidler, '09, and Victor 

each had a home run. Weidler, '10, J. Warren Stehman, 

'09, Frank Hartman, '08, Conserva- 
tory , were some of the other Alumni 

Allimni rft present for commencement. 

W. J. Sanders, '02, is teaching 

English in the McKinley High School, 

Paul Smith, '03, was in town re- St< Louis . This is h j g third year in 

cently visiting his father Paul P. hjg present position . 

Smith. Mr. Smith is connected with ... 

4l „, , „ . .... „ , Miss Reba Lehman, '00, arrived 

the Westinghouse firm in New York. „, , , 

T r, 0l , . , , Wednesday, toj late for conimence- 

J. C. Strock, '10, was married last . . . .. . „ 

...... . „ . . ■ , ment but in time for the Alumni Ban- 
week to Minnie Emrich, of Lebanon. ... T , 

e , , , , ,. quet. Miss Lehman is located at Haz- 
Mr. Strock returned from his year s 

elton, Pa. 

work in the West to go upon his honey- 
moon. Hiram E. Steinmetz, '74, is recall- 

W. E. Harnish, '10, will again re- ing P ,easant reminiscences with his 

turn to Cass City, Michigan, next claS3mate - Prof - Lehman - He has 

year missed but one or two commencements 

w a J-,,*,™., in u since graduation. 
W. A. drunner, 11, has securea a 

poistion at York, Pa., in the High Miss 0ra M - Harnish, '06, principal 

School. Burd School, Philadelphia, was pre- 

J. H. Sprecher, '07, late principal vented from attending the Alumni ban- 
of Honey Brook Borough High School ^ uet and responding to the toast "The 
was elected principal of Parkesburg College Woman," by the serious ill- 
High School at a salary of $1000 rer ness of or,e nf the students, 
year. He is now looking for an assis- Mrs. Dr. Philips, nee Enid Daniel, 
tant in his work. '00, is living in Kansas City, Missouri, 

The largest class at Lebanon High a"d is secretary of the Woman's Club 

School was graduated this year under of 600 members, and is head of the de- 

the supervision of Prof. E. M. Bals- partment of Education in the club, 

baugh, '01. The Commencement exer- Col. W. R. Kohr, '04, has resigned 

cises were very highly commended. at St. Charles Military Academy and 

W. C. Plummer, '1C, has returned will go to Missouri Military Academy 

from Beardstown, 111 , where he was at Mexico, Missouri, 

teaching Mathematics, for the events Chas. H. Fisher, '03, Professor of 

of Commencement week. Latin in the York High School, accom- 

H. H. Burd, '01, was elected prin- panied by his wife, formerly Mary 

c'pal of the central grammar school, Light, '04, were visitors here during 

Altoona, Pa. He was formerly ward the week. Prof. Fisher responded to 

principal and has received a good ad- the toast "The Conservation of the 

vance in salary. Small College" in which he pointed 

Edith Freed, '10. has returned for but some interesting suggestions for 

commencement. the policy of a small college. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



5 



Class Day 

Continued from page 2 



words and music, were composed by 
Mr. Earle A. Spessard. These comp- 
ositions all reflected great credit on 
their author who shows marked musical 
ability. After the singing of the 
March song, the president's address 
was delivered by John K. Lehman 
which was brimming over with cordia- 
lity and good will. The last class 
meeting asjwell as the one representing 
the reunion a quarter of a century 
hence provided a means of airing the 
jukes incident to the college life of 
the past year. Some of the ccstumes 
depecting the changes wrought in the 
several members in the period of 
twenty five years called forth great 
applause. At the conclusion of the 
program streamers of the class colors 
red and white came down over the 
class assembled in the center of the 
stage where they gave their class yell. 



Oratorical Contest 

First Prize - Guy Wingerd 
Second Prize - J. W. Ischy 
Third Prize - A. S. Beckley 

The annual Junior oratorical contest 
was held Tuesday evening at 8:00 in 
the Engle Auditorium. Six Juniors 
competed for the prizes. The 
following was the order of rendition : 

Music, orchestra ; Invocation ; music, 
orchestra; "Truth and Dogma," 
Arthur S. Beckley , "The Boy With 
the Hoe," J. W. Ischy; Quartet; 
"The Life Superb," Josiah F. Reed; 
"The American Volunteer," Chester 
E. Rettew; Quartet; "The Ruins of 
Time," N. B. S. Thomas; "Our 
Perversion of Democracy," Guy 
Wingerd; Music, orchestra; Awarding 
of prizes; Music , orchestra. 

The Judges of Delivery were : Rev. 
J. Leonard Hynson, Lebanon, Pa., E. 
D. Siegrist, Esq. , Lebanon, Pa., Rev. 
D. Burt Smith, Hummelstown, <>a. 

The Judges of Composition were — 
Prof. H. H. Baiah. '01, Altoona, Pa., 
Rev. S. E. Rupp, Lebanon, Pa. 

This was an unusually interesting 
contest. Each oration was prepared 
and delivered with such merit that it 



was difficult to determine which would 
be the victors. For one hour and a 
half one of the largest audiences at a 
similar occasion for a number of jears, 
listened to the orators of the evening. 

Mr. Beckley i n "Truth and 
Dogma," presented his oration in a 
clear and forceful manner, holding the 
attention of the audience to the end. 
He brought out the dogmatic views 
of the old philosophers and also the 
truths which they presented. He show- 
ed how in Dogma alone it was practi- 
cally a case of "The blind leading the 
blind." He pointed to the noble 
achievements of Columbus and Alex- 




GUY WINGERD '12 
Winner of First Prize 820 



ander Hamilton." To go from the 
Region of Dogma to the Kingdom of 
Truth one must enter as a little child. 

Mr. Ischy in "The Boy With the 
Hoe" showed the advantage a country 
boy bad over the city boy. "From 
the ranks of these common country 
people the famous sons of America 
come." The halls of fame are decked 
with the pictures of the same. He 
compared the boy who must spend his 
life in th« city to an eagle imprisoned 
in a narrow cage when he ought to be 
monarch of the air. The country boy 
of yesterday holds the financial posi- 
tions and positions of trust of today. 
He is like a loft/ peak extending far 
above the mountains surrounding it. 

Mr. Reed in "The Life Superb" 
showed that the high ideals of many 
are hardly attainable. Noble life lies 
in common place things and come from 
the same. Man's character is the 



great thing in life. The Greeks and 
Romans had the best of culture but 
had no honor for themselves. The 
home is the place where the youth 
must get his ideals. It is only the 
real and genuine that stands the test 
of time. 

Mr. Rettew in "The American 
Volunteer" brought out the longing 
for freedom of the original thirteen 
colonies so that when the critical 
time came there were many volunteers 
for the cause and the result was that 
the colonies became free and indepen- 
dent. Same was true in the Civil 
War. But such is no longer the case 
under our modern institutions permit- 
ting child-labor in factories and sweat 
shops. Throughout his oration he 
vividly presented the injustice and in- 
humanitarian consequences of that 
abominable practice. 

Mr. Thomas in "The Ruins of 
Time" clearly presented the ruins of 
Empires and the reasons for and results 
of the same. The record of ages 
beholds its own destiny. As with 
triumphant time, so is it with man 
and Empire; they rise, flourish and 
pass away. The cities of Antiquity 
are buried under the ruins of time. 

Mr. Wingerd in "Our Perversion 
of Democracy" raised the question 
whether our beloved republic was free 
from peril or not. He showed how 
the Pilgrim fathers founded our nation 
and gave us our free homes. He 
pointed out that )aw is the greatest 
thing and if we reject it we reject the 
basis of government. In states like 
Colorado, the state legislatures de- 
clined to follow the constitution and 
now mob law is substituted for the 
regular law. ' • Let us obey the law. ' ' 
He gave his oration in a forceful 
and convincing manner. His com- 
position was good and his delivery 
won for him the prize. 

The judges of the contest awarded 
the first prize of twenty dollars to 
Guy Wingred, second prize of ten 
dollars to J. W. Ischy and the third 
prize of five dollars to A. S. Beckley. 

A mistake was made in the an- 
nouncement of the prizes which has 
here been corrected. The quartette 
composed of Messrs. Rodes, Klinger, 
Botts, and Hensel rendered two splen- 
did selections with appropriate en- 
cores. 



6 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleixis 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

SAMUEL O. GRIMM, '12 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

CLAIR F. HARNISH, '12 
JOHN W. ISCHY, '12 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

CATHARINE E. HERSHEY, '12 
HELEN L. WEIDLER, '12 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '12 
EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 
AMOS H. WEIGLE, '13 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

V. D. MULHOLLEN, '13, 

ASS'T. BUSINESS MANAGERS 

JOHN B. LYTER '14: 
JOHN E. SHERK '14 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies j ets. 
Clubs of len, 75 els. 

. Address all business communications 

to V. D. MULHOLLEN, Box , all 

other matter to Room 19, Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Commencement Number 

This is therefore, the last regular 
issue of this volume of the "College 
News." As soon as this issue is off 
our hands we will set about clearing 
the editorial desk of all the rubbish 
that may have collected there and 
leave it clean and bright for the 
opening of the next year. Our ser- 
vice has been short, and in that time 
we have had our ups and downs, but 
we have profited greatly by the ex- 
periences of the last two months in 
editing this, the college paper. We 
have tried to give you, the readers, 
the best that our time, our ability, and 
our surrounding conditions would per- 
mit. .We realize that we have failed 
in many respects for which we deserve 
and expect your critism. If we 
have succeeded in others, we appre- 
ciate your commendation. 

We wish to thank all who have been 
concerned in carrying through this 
year's production of this paper, the 
readers, the contributors to its 
columns, the editors, and the business 
managers. All have worked faith- 
fully; especially is this true of several 
individuals. Especially do we express 
our gratitude to those who have 
offered us suggestions for the better- 
ment of the paper during the year. 

If we did not seem to take your 
suggestions in their entirety, don't be 



discouraged for there have been con- 
ditions of which you were not aware. 
We ask your interest and your help 
during the ensuing year. 

When you have received this the 
last number, remember that our 
vacation has begun, and that school 
opens again in September when the 
"NEWS" will again take its place 
upon your reading list. If your sub- 
scription has expired or is unpaid, 
see to it immediately that the matter 
is attended to. We take our depar- 
ture for the summer vacation. - 

The Alumni Banquet 

The Annual Banquet of the Alumni 
Association was held on Wednesday 
afternoon at one o'clock in the dining 
hall of the Academy Building. Rev. 
I. E. Runk, '99, presided as Toast- 
master and called for the following 
toasts "The class of 1911" responded 
to by E. A. Spessard. "Go Right On 
Working the Horse." responded by 
Prcf. J. E. Lehman, '74, and "The 
Conservation of the Small College" 
responded to by Prof. C. H. Fisher, 
'04. 

The following menu was served: 
Fruit a l'alumni, veal cutlet, creamed 
potatoes, green peas, cream sauce, 
salad, mayonaise Dressing wafers, 
punch, olives, Sandwiches, cheese, 
salted almonds, mints, ice cream, 
cakes, coffee. 

Keims orchestra, of Lebanon 
furnished music for the occasion. 



Oratory Dramatics 

The Oratory Dramatics given 
Wednesday evening, consisted of three 
plays and music. The first play, a 
comedy "In Honor Bound" is a society 
play, serious and strong. The cast 
consisted of J. W. Ischy, who well 
took the part of a lawyer, Mrs. 
Hockenbury, his wife, Grace Smith, 
their niece, and Paul Koontz, her 
lover. The second play, "Queen Anne 
Cottages" is a farce. A boy and a 
girl run away in order to escape meet- 
ing at a dinner party. But they acci- 
dentally meet at a summer cottage. 
There are several cottages of the same 
kind so that complications occur. 
The owner of these cottages arrives 
and matters are somewhat arranged. 
The parts were taken by Carrie Light, 
Helen Weidler, V. D. Mulhollen, 



Rodes, Josephine Ulrich, and Ethel 
Daugherty. The third play, is an 18th 
century comedy. "Holly Tree Inn" 
is dramatized from Dicken's story of 
the same name. The story hinges 
upon two children, Verda Snyder and 
Helen Brightbill who have run away 
from home to be married. The 
children come to Holly Tree Inn, 
where the landlord and his wife, J. 
W. Ischy and Edna Yarkers keep them 
until the arrival of the boy's father, 
Russel Weidler. The maid and man- 
servant are Miss Dubble and Mr. Mc- 
Connel. All the characters are well 
taken. The casts have worked faith- 
fully under the direction of Mis3 
Adams. The music was in charge of 
Professor Sheldon. The proceeds will 
be used for the benef't of the new 
stage. 

Art Exhibit 

The Art department has been open 
commencement week, for inspection. 
The work of the ait department is 
very'commendable and Miss Boehm, the 
head of the same, is to be congratulated 
for the fine results of her work. Miss 
Cook, one of the Art students has 
finished the most China work and 
readily shows the result of Miss 
Boehm's supervison. 

Miss Adams Entertains 

A delightful social function was held 
Monday evening at the close of the 
Music and Oratory Commencement 
exercises when Miss Adams enter- 
tained the members of the casts in the 
Wednesday evening Dramatic enter- 
tainment. A dainty luncheon was 
served and Miss Adams delighted her 
guests with several readings. 

After the luncheon was served Miss 
Helen Brightbill presented to Miss 
Adams a beautiful bureau set consist 
ing of a mirrow brush and comb, from 
the members of the cast. 

Those present were, Misses Grace 
Smith, Helen Weidler, Carrie Light, 
Josephine Urich, Ethel Daugherty, 
Helen Brightbill, Verda Snyder, Edna 
Yarkers, Anna Dubble, Mrs. E. J. 
Hockenbury, Messrs. J. W. Ischy, 
Victor Mulhollen, Lester Rhodes, 
Russel Weidler, Wm. McConnell and 
Paul Koontz. 

George Guyer, ex '12, is spending 
commencement week among friends 
here. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



7 



'VARSITY MEN AND 

FACULTY ENTERTAINED 

Thursday night, June 1, the Varsity 
base ball men, faculty and a few 
friends were very pleasantly enter- 
tained at the home of Prof. Shroyer. 
A number of speech*^ were delivered 
along the line of athletics in general, 
and upon the successful base ball sea- 
son. After the discussions were ended, 
refreshments, agreeable to all, were 
served. 

The evening was one full of pleasure 
to all. 



Senior Recital by Ora Bachman 

The fourth Pianoforte recital was 
given Thursday night, June 1, by Miss 
Ora Bachman. She was ably assisted 
by Miss Helen Brightbill who gave 
two readings. A good sized audience 
was present and showed their ap- 
preciation of the splendidly rendered 
numbers by their hearty applause. 
Miss Bachman received quite a number 
of very beautiful flowers from her 
many friends. 





Items of Interest 



H. S. Dunmire, formerly a student 
of L. V. C. conservatory has opened a 
studio at No. 338 North 9th Street, 
Lebanon. During the past year Mr. 
Dunmire has been a student of Mr. 
Leefson, now of Philadelphia and 
formerly of Amsterdam Holland. Mr. 
Leefson is considered by many the 
most artistic and technical instructor 
in Philadelphia ; this is reflected in Mr. 
Dunmire's work, which is highly ap- 
preciated by students and parents of 
Lebanon, so that now his enrollment 
is nearing sixty. 

Prof. Shenk gave the Memorial ad- 
dress at Palmyra, Decoration Day, 
May 30. 

Mrs. J. M. Kerchner visited her 
daughter Maude, during the exercises 
of the week. 

Mr. H. K. Kauffman, accompanied 
by his daughte, Belle, visited his son 
A. 0. Kauffman, 11, during the past 
few days. 

Mrs. W. K. Smith and son, Aldeu, 
were the guests of Grace N. Smith 
during commencement. 



Rev. Z. A. Weid'er, ex-student of 
the college was the guest of his son 
Russel and daughter Helen, during 
commencement. 

Mark G. Holtzman, ex-student, 
was here attending the exercises of 
the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Ehrhart, Miss 
Mary Ehrhart, Catharine Ehrhart, 
Annie M. Tillman, of Millersvillo 
were the guests of O. T. Ehrhart, '11, 
during commencement. 

Rev. P. R. Rodes, was the guest of 
his son Lester A. Rodes over com- 
mencement. 

Rev. A. N. Horn, Enola, Pa., was 
the guest of his daughter Clara K., 
during commencement. 

Rev. and Mrs. J. P. Koontz, of 
West Fairview, were the guests of 
their son Paul R., '11, during com- 
mencement week. 

Miss Ethel G. Redding, of Hanover 
was a guest at the college during com- 
mencement. 

Prof. Shenk gave an address before 
the Annville High School Alumni at 
their annual banquet at the Hotel 
Wallace, Lebanon. His subject was 
the "Survival of The Fittest." 



Deans' Resignatoin 

Prof. H. H. Shenk, dean of the col- 
lege for the past four years, has ten- 
dered his resignation as dean. He 
will remain as professor of History 
and Economics, and will devote his 
entire time to his departmental work. 



SEPPIY 



DAYTON, O. 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 



The Missionary. 
The Deaconess. 



Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy" or 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Work, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Foreigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
single students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 

„ J. P. LANDIS 

Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 





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W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 
STEPHEN HUBERTIS 

Book Binder 

320 Market St., HARRISBURC, PA. 

Magazines and College Books 
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8 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Biological Laboratory 

lo the splendid equipment of the 
Biological Laboratory has been added 
a number of beautiful portraits of men 
famous in the scientific world, especi- 
ally along the line of Biology. These 
portraits, appropriately framed, add 
much to the appearance of the depart- 
ment, and recall to one's mind that 
the study of Biology has advanced step 
by step and that in its ranks are found 
some of the greatest scientists of the 
world. These portraits have been 
made as enlargements from Prof. 
Locy's Biology and Its Makers, by the 
permission ui tne author. The depart- 
ment is indebted to Alfred K. Mills, 
'04, for the generous gift. 



Read 

Having been misrepresented upon a 
recent occasion. 1 deem it just that I 
should correct any wrong impression 
that may exist. 

As foot ball manager last fall, was 
instructed by the executive com- 
mittee of the Athletic Association 
to purchase rope and stakes to rope off 
gridiron. Tne cost of said rope was 
$10, which was the lowest cost possible 
in order to meet requirements stipula- 
ted by aforesaid committee Said 
stakes cost $2.10, including workman- 
ship on same, and not the fabulous 
sum mentioned in the misconceived 
statement. 

Moreover, I wish to state, that the 
schedule itself yielded $18.58 profit. 

There was a balance of at least $175 
in the treasury at end of season. Had 
the management been as represented, 
the base ball season would not have 
been possible. I am willing to furnish 
na itemized account of all receipts and 
expenditures of entire season. Same 
appears on treasurer's books, having 
been adopted by Executive committe. 

In view of the many obstacles that 
could not be overcome and which fore- 
bear to enumerate because of certain 
wcrthy gentlemen concerned, but 
which are well known to the student 
body and others in general and all 
who have ever managed athletics at 
our college in particular, I deem the 
exaggerated statement as unjust and 
uncalled for. EX-MANAGER 



jCebanon 9/alley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Grovp System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

S/?ev, jCawrence Jfeister, iPres. 
jfnnvilte, ZPa. 

Have Your Printing Done by 

The Journal Publishing Co. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
When You Want THE BETTER GRADE 

Frederick W. Light 

826 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Representing 
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
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Who made a home run ? No one. 
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Bats and Gloves From SPESSARB S 
carefully selected stock of Baseball 
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H. E. SPESSARD'S BOOKSTORE 



Journal Building 



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Claud R. Engle, '92, Harrisburg, 
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You are correct If you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS 
FURNISHINGS 

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Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works 

A. F. Ward '90 Proprieter 

27 N. Seventh St. Lebanon Pa. 

Represented at College 

CFull line of College Post Cards 
Writing Papers, Envelopes, Tablets. 
Pens, Pencils, Ink, Pictures, Pen 
nants, Box Paper, Photopaste. Also Eyes 
Examined and Glasses Fitted. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
WEST MAIN STREET ANNVILLE. PA 

The CHAS. H. ELLIOTT 
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Shortage of fully 10,000 Operators on account of 
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